Houston Baptist University Catalog

English ( ENGL ) Course Descriptions

  • ENGL 1303 BASIC GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION

    ENGL 1303 Basic Grammar and Composition
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A prerequisite course for enrollment in ENGL 1320 for students scoring below 18 on the English section of the ACT or below 480 on the SAT. Students with no available test scores will also be enrolled in ENGL 1303. ENGL 1303 is an introduction to the principles of composition accomplished through the study of grammar, standard English usage, and rhetorical techniques and strategies. This course emphasizes basic grammar and composition and focuses on sentence structure and on organizing and developing the short essay. Students must also register for one writing lab, ENGL 1003 which meets for two hours weekly. ENGL 1303 does not meet the Liberal Arts Core requirements for either the BA or the BS degree but does carry elective credit.

  • ENGL 1320 WRITING FOR WISDOM I

    ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I
    Prerequisite(s): SAT Essay Subscore 08 or SAT Writing 500 or ACT English 22 or ENGL 1303 with a minimum grade of C
    This course teaches the fundamentals of college reading, thinking, and writing from a classical, Christian perspective. Writing for Wisdom grounds students in a deep understanding of and appreciation for proper standards of written English including mechanical skills and forms while using writing as a vehicle for intellectual, emotional, ethical, and spiritual wrestling. It moves past the kinds of fashionable current event topics normally assigned in freshmen Composition classes. Rather, students engage in wider issues and questions: Who am I? Why am I here? What is my purpose? How do I know I am of value? Finally, through a close study of a series of classical works from our Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian heritage, students will explore their status as citizens of a deliberative democracy and seek to define, and manifest in their lives, the nature of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful.

  • ENGL 1330 WRITING FOR WISDOM II

    ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320
    This course continues the study of composition and rhetoric introduced in English 1320: Writing for Wisdom I. Students will gain an understanding of why reading literature is deeply important for Christians, learn the conventions of such literary genres as poems, stories, novels, and plays, study methods of literary analysis, interpret literature from a Biblical perspective through the exploration of Biblical archetypes, typology, language constructions, and metaphor in classic works of English literature, and learn to write well-constructed and well-written arguments about literature and life in standard English including the use of research in MLA format and the writing of a fully developed research paper.

  • ENGL 2315 GREAT WORKS OF LITERATURE I

    ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A reading course in the literary heritage of western civilization. This course includes readings from the Greeks, the Romans, and the Middle Ages.

  • ENGL 2325 GREAT WORKS OF LITERATURE II

    ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A reading course in the literary heritage of western civilization. This course includes readings from the 18th century to the present.

  • ENGL 3313 ENGLISH LITERATURE I

    ENGL 3313 English Literature I
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A survey of the historical development of English literature from its beginning through the eighteenth century: historical background and major authors of each period. The course will provide requisite information for advanced study in major periods of English literature. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3321 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ENGL 3321 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ENGL 3323 ENGLISH LITERATURE II

    ENGL 3323 English Literature II
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A survey of the historical development of English literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: historical background and major authors of each period. The course will provide requisite information for advanced study in major periods of English literature. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3331 AMERICAN LITERATURE I

    ENGL 3331 American Literature I
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course examines the beginnings of America’s literary self-definition in the Colonial Period and covers the rise of American Romanticism and its culmination in writers such as Emerson, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Dickinson. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3332 AMERICAN LITERATURE II

    ENGL 3332 American Literature II
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course examines American literary trends after the Civil War, including Realism, Naturalism, and Modernism. Writers under consideration include Twain, S. Crane, Frost, Stevens, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3334 LITERATURE/CULTURE:SOUTHWEST

    ENGL 3334 Literature and Culture of the Southwest
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    The course addresses the way the American West has shaped American culture and popular culture. It examines the Frontier Myth, Manifest Destiny, Regeneration through Violence, America’s cowboy archetype, the savage archetype, and the American dream. Students read literature written by authors from a variety of cultures, including Anglo, Mexican-American, and Native American. Students view television shows and films to examine how popular culture has created and enforced stereotypes. The course is designed for non-majors seeking upper level elective credit or to fulfill Liberal Arts Core requirements.

  • ENGL 3342 WOMEN’S LITERATURE

    ENGL 3342 Women’s Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course will acquaint students with literature by and about women from the medieval period to the present. Through a study of various literary genres, students will learn that the issues that concern women transcend time, place, race, religion, and ethnicity. This course is designed for non-English majors seeking upper level elective credit or to fulfill Liberal Arts Core requirements and for persons seeking certification in Language Arts Grades 6-8 and Grades 8-12.

  • ENGL 3346 AUSTEN AND THE BRONTES

    ENGL 3346 Austen and the Brontes
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course covers selected novels of Jane Austen and Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Bronte, influential 19th century writers who wrote of affairs of the heart with insight and passion. Students will study the authors’ social and intellectual milieu and discuss their works and compare them to some of the film adaptations of these popular works.

  • ENGL 3363 FILM STUDIES

    ENGL 3363 Film Studies
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    An introduction to the art of film. Students are provided with a methodology and a vocabulary for understanding film and are encouraged to consider how different directors guide and shape our perceptions of reality, how different genres generate their own unique vision of the world and of humanity, how the multi-media aspects of film affect us as viewers, how film provides us with a record of cultural values and cultural change, and how screen writers, actors, directors, and cinematographers translate literary genres into visual terms. This course may be used for elective credit.

  • ENGL 3370 HISPANIC LITERATURE

    ENGL 3370 Hispanic Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    The study of major periods and masterworks of Hispanic literature, read and discussed in English. Introduces literary/cultural figures of medieval and early modern Spain (El Cid, Don Quixote, Don Juan); and includes major 20th-century writers, as well as literary movements that were propagated from Latin America to the rest of the literary world (e.g., magical realism). This course may not be used to fulfill requirements for the Spanish major. (Offered also as SPAN 3370.)

  • ENGL 3371 CHRONICLES OF NARNIA

    ENGL 3371 Chronicles of Narnia
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Students complete a close reading of the seven novels that make up the Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. Students assess how and to what extent the Chronicles successfully foster spiritual maturity, strength of character, and moral virtue. Special focus will be placed on the Christian allegories that underlie each of the novels.

  • ENGL 3372 MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE

    ENGL 3372 Multicultural Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Students study ethnic literatures, including works by authors from the following cultural voices: North American Indian, African American, Mexican American, Asian American, and Americans of Middle Eastern descent.

  • ENGL 3373 SHAKESPEARE

    ENGL 3373 Shakespeare
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A study of selected tragedies, history plays, and comedies, with emphasis on the major tragedies. Some consideration will be given to the cultural and philosophical characteristics of the Elizabethan Age as they are reflected in the drama of Shakespeare. For English majors or permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3377 LORD OF THE RINGS

    ENGL 3377 Lord of the Rings
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Students complete readings from Beowulf and selected Arthurian romances and a close reading of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. The course also includes an overview of The Silmarillion and a discussion of how Tolkien was influenced by Norse mythology, Beowulf, Arthurian Romances, his Catholic faith, and his friendship with C. S. Lewis.

  • ENGL 3378 THE LEGACY OF GREECE

    ENGL 3378 The Legacy of Greece
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course takes students on an exciting journey through the great literary works of Ancient Greece: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey; Aeschylus’ Oresteia (Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, Eumenides), Sophocles’ Oedipus, Antigone, Women of Trachis, and Philoctetes; Euripides’ Medea, Hippolytus and Bacchae. The course examines the nature of the epic and tragic hero and those universal questions we all must answer for ourselves: Who am I?, What is my purpose?, How do I know I am of value? The course will also offer an overview of ancient Greek history and consider Greece’s legacy for Western civilization.

  • ENGL 3379 THE LEGACY OF ROME

    ENGL 3379 The Legacy of Rome
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course takes students on an exciting journey through the great literary works of Ancient Rome and Medieval Italy: Virgil’s Aeneid; Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Dante’s Divine Comedy: Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso. The course examines the nature of the classical and medieval epic hero and those universal questions we all must answer for ourselves: Who am I?, What is my purpose?, How do I know I am of value? The course will also offer an overview of ancient Roman history, consider Rome’s legacy for Western civilization, and discuss how Dante, while imitating pagan writers, was able to fashion a Christian epic.

  • ENGL 3381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ENGL 3381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330.
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ENGL 3384 RELIGION:AMERICAN LIT/FILM

    ENGL 3384 Religion in American Literature and Film
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Students read novels, including Flannery O’Connor’s Wise Blood, Davis Grubb’s Night of the Hunter (screenplay by James Agee), Sinclair Lewis’s Elmer Gantry, and Marilyn Robinson’s Gilead. Students also view films based on these and other novels that portray religion in 20th century American society, and learn to analyze both genres for plot, characterization, metaphors, themes and other literary elements.

  • ENGL 3385 THE WRITINGS OF C.S. LEWIS

    ENGL 3385 The Writings of C.S. Lewis
    Prerequisite(s): None
    C.S. Lewis, the greatest Christian apologist of the 20th century, has challenged three generations of readers to think logically and imaginatively about their faith, their moral behavior, and their view of man, God, and the universe. This class will study closely Lewis’s seven major apologetical works (Mere Christianity, The Problem of Pain, Miracles, Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Abolition of Man, and A Grief Observed) and seek to determine why these works have had such a phenomenal and growing impact both on Christians of all denominations and on those of other (or no) religious backgrounds.

  • ENGL 3386 THE INKLINGS

    ENGL 3386 The Inklings
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Although the late 19th century was a golden age for children’s literature, after WWI a more cynical, realistic Europe relegated fairy tales to the nursery. A group known as the Inklings–which centered on C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams–played a major role in revising the reputation of fantastical literature. This class will study Lewis’s Space Trilogy (Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, That Hideous Strength) and Till We Have Faces, Tolkien’s shorter fairy tales and essay On Fairy Stories, and one of the spiritual warfare novels of Charles Williams (Descent into Hell). The class will also consider how the Inklings were influenced by the faerie stories of George MacDonald (Phantastes, Lillith), and the imaginative apologetics of G.K. Chesterton (Orthodoxy, The Everlasting Man).

  • ENGL 4311 LITERARY CRITICISM

    ENGL 4311 Literary Criticism
    Prerequisite(s): (ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330) or (HNRS 2310 and HNRS 2340)
    A survey of literary theory from Plato to Postmodernism. The course provides an understanding of the different theoretical structures, schools, and methodologies that have influenced our understanding and appreciation of literature. It explores the presuppositions upon which each theoretical system is founded and the special terminology associated with each system. Students planning to pursue a graduate degree are strongly encouraged to take this course.

  • ENGL 4330 MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

    ENGL 4330 Medieval Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Middle Ages in Britain (ca. 450-1485). Works and authors may include Beowulf, Gawain and the Green Knight, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Gower’s Confessio Amantis, Langland’s Piers Plowman, and Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur. As Rome waned, western Europe was transformed politically by the rise of feudal kingdoms and religiously by the flowering of an influential and dynamic Church. In this class, we will examine closely how different works and authors reflect and engage the many facets of medieval culture, including chivalry and heroism, courtly love, practical Christian piety, and the grim realities of war at home and abroad.

  • ENGL 4331 RENAISSANCE ENGLISH LIT

    ENGL 4331 Renaissance English Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Renaissance in England (1485-1600). Works and authors may include William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas More’s Utopia, Elizabeth I, Francis Bacon, Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella, and Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene. In a time of new classical learning, violent religious controversy, and political upheaval, Renaissance England was rich with remarkable creativity and artistic achievement in prose, poetry, and drama. In this class, we will examine closely how different Renaissance writers expressed and explored the human condition at all levels, in a period that speaks beautifully of the True and the Good perhaps more than any other.

  • ENGL 4332 17TH CENTURY ENGLISH LIT

    ENGL 4332 17th-Century English Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of seventeenth-century England (ca. 1601-1700). Works and authors may include John Donne’s lyric poetry, Ben Jonson’s comedies, John Webster’s macabre drama, George Herbert’s The Temple, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, Cavalier poetry, Richard Crashaw, Margaret Cavendish, Lucy Hutchinson, Thomas Browne, Andrew Marvell, Aphra Behn, and William Congreve. The literature of this period is extraordinary for elaborate form and conceit, intense meditative and devotional lyric, response to revolutionary scientific discoveries, and political satire, polemic, and debate through a period of civil war, regicide, and republican experiment.

  • ENGL 4333 18TH CENTURY BRITISH LIT

    ENGL 4333 18th-Century British Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Long Eighteenth Century (1688-1815). Works and authors may include John Dryden, Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Samuel Richardson’s Pamela, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones, Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, Alexander Pope, Laurence Sterne, Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, Frances Burney, and Jane Austen. Topics may include Enlightenment thought, Augustan poetry, sentimental fiction, comedy of manners, early gothic romance, satire, coffeehouses, the rise of the novel and of journalism, and developments in literary criticism, biography, the essay, and the dictionary.

  • ENGL 4334 THE ROMANTIC AGE

    ENGL 4334 The Romantic Age
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Romantic Age (1789-1832). Works and authors may include Blake’s Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Wordsworth’s Prelude, Coleridge’s Christabel, Byron’s Don Juan and Manfred, Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound, and Keats’s Eve of St. Agnes and Lamia. In this class, we will examine closely the unique zeitgeist of the Romantic Age, one that marks a transition between traditional, pre-French revolutionary Europe and the modern Europe of which we are heirs. Like the great figures of the Renaissance, the Romantics saw themselves as breaking from past traditions while yet carrying on perennial conversations about human nature, the natural world, the imagination, and the divine.

  • ENGL 4335 THE VICTORIAN AGE

    ENGL 4335 The Victorian Age
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Victorian Age (1833-1901). Works and authors may include Tennyson’s In Memoriam and Idyls of the King, Browning’s Fra Lippo Lippi and Andrea del Sarto, Newman’s Apologia Pro Vita Sua, John Stuart Mill’s Autobiography, Ruskin’s Stones of Venice, Carlyle’s Sartor Resartus, T.H. Huxley’s On the Physical Basis of Life, and Arnold’s Function of Criticism. The Victorian Age was an age during which the orthodoxies of the past were put to the test by new theories of science, progress, philosophy, art, religion, authority, etc. In this class, we will examine closely how each Victorian writer reacted to and wrestled with these challenges.

  • ENGL 4336 20TH CENTURY BRITISH LIT

    ENGL 4336 20th-Century British Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of major authors writing in English in Modern and contemporary letters. Authors may include T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and William Butler Yeats, among others. Special consideration will be given to the literature of the world wars, modernism, and post-modernism.

  • ENGL 4337 AMERICAN ROMANTICISM

    ENGL 4337 American Romanticism
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course is an intensive study of both American Renaissances — the one of American Transcendentalism with authors such as Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Whitman, Hawthorne, and Melville, as well as the renaissance of sentimental American writers such as Longfellow, Alcott, and Stowe.

  • ENGL 4338 AMERICAN REALISM & NATURALISM

    ENGL 4338 American Realism and Naturalism
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course is an intensive study of the great realists and naturalists, including Jack London, Edith Wharton, Henry James, Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, and Theodore Dreiser. Special attention will be paid to the historical context of American realism and its concomitant literary outgrowths, including magic realism and dystopian fiction.

  • ENGL 4339 AMER MODERNISM/CONTEMPORARY

    ENGL 4339 American Modernism and Contemporary Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course is an intensive study of the rise of Modernism and the expatriate movement in American letters, with possible authors including Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, H.D., and Wallace Stevens. Contemporary experimental authors as well as the current use of modernist literary techniques will also be explored. Attention may also be paid to music and visual art of the modernist movement.

  • ENGL 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ENGL 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.