Houston Baptist University Catalog

  • ACAD 1001 INTRO:GREAT BOOKS I

    ACAD 1001 Introduction to Great Books I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Introduction to Great Books and Composition I is a literature and writing course centered on the Chronicles of Narnia, and selections from authors that students will read in depth in their dual-credit classes, such as Plato, Aristotle, Dickens, Chesterton, and the gospel writers. The class also uses Harvey’s Elementary Grammar and Composition for composition lessons, with a particular emphasis on the argumentative and persuasive essay.

  • ACAD 1002 INTRO:WESTERN CIVILIZATION I

    ACAD 1002 Introduction to Western Civilization I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to the major cultures and cultural shifts of the ancient and medieval worlds, with a particular emphasis on Biblical and Grecian history and the development of Europe.

  • ACAD 1003 EUCLIDEAN GEOMETRY

    ACAD 1003 Euclidean Geometry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Students will learn geometry from its very foundations, by working as a class through Euclid’s Elements. The last quarter of the course will take the skills and understandings learned and apply them directly to succeeding at the SAT and other important math competency and placement tests.

  • ACAD 1004 ART METHODS & MATERIALS

    ACAD 1004 Art Methods and Materials
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to fine art technique in drawing, painting, and print making.

  • ACAD 1005 AMERICAN HISTORY

    ACAD 1005 American History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of American history from its origins to the close of Reconstruction.

  • ACAD 1006 INTRO TO GREAT BOOKS II

    ACAD 1006 Introduction to Great Books II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Introduction to Great Books and Composition II is a literature and writing course centered on the The Lord of the Rings and selections from authors that students will read in depth in their dual-credit classes, such as Plato, Hopkins, Alcott, Aristotle, and St. Paul. The class also uses Harvey’s English Grammar and Composition for composition lessons, with a particular emphasis on the argumentative essay.

  • ACAD 1007 INTRO:WESTERN CIVILIZATION II

    ACAD 1007 Introduction to Western Civilization II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to the major cultures and cultural shifts of the Western world, starting with the Elizabethans and moving through the World Wars.

  • ACAD 1008 HIGH SCHOOL ECONOMICS

    ACAD 1008 High School Economics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A one semester long class in the essentials of modern economics.

  • ACAD 1081 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ACAD 1081 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A continuation and advancement of the skills begun in Introduction to Logic, Rhetoric, and Composition, with a particular emphasis in academic research and essay writing.

  • ACCT 2301 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I

    ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to the identification and analysis of business transactions and the financial accounting information system that captures them. Included is the flow of activities within the system culminating in the four basic financial statements of a for-profit business. Emphasis is placed on the use of these financial statements to make business credit and investment decisions.x

  • ACCT 2303 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II

    ACCT 2303 Principles of Accounting II
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2301
    An introductory course designed for managers throughout the organization and the tools they use in performing the planning and controlling of operations. Students will be introduced to: internal use reporting developed from the accounting information system; budgeting; determining product costs; and analyzing costs as to function and behavior. Interesting questions are discussed such as: How does a manager use accounting goals to motivate employees? How does a marketing department determine price? How does an organization determine what data to capture in the accounting information system?

  • ACCT 3303 COST ACCOUNTING

    ACCT 3303 Cost Accounting
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2303
    An in-depth study of the accounting tools managers use in performing the planning and controlling of operations. Students will develop and analyze internal reports for service as well as manufacturing companies; determine how the cost of a product is determined under several cost flow systems; allocate the costs of support departments; prepare detailed variances and interpret the results.

  • ACCT 3304 INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAXES

    ACCT 3304 Individual Income Taxes
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2303
    Current federal revenue acts affecting individual tax returns; procedures for computing the income tax liability of individuals. Practice in solving typical problems and in the preparation of tax returns.

  • ACCT 3317 ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS

    ACCT 3317 Accounting Information Systems
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3312
    An active, hands-on class that equips the accounting with both knowledge and skills to evaluate and create an accounting information system; work with a relational data base; evaluate and implement control systems; and assess and implement an accounting reporting system. Also included are current uses of technology in accounting utilizing several software applications.

  • ACCT 3321 INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCT I

    ACCT 3321 Intermediate Financial Accounting I
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2303
    This course aims at equipping students with the fundamental financial accounting concepts and techniques underlying the preparation and interpretation of financial statements of business organizations. It also covers the procedures involved in recording business transactions and events using the double-entry system, conceptual framework for financial reporting, codification of accounting standards, and the accounting for cash and receivables.

  • ACCT 3321 INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCT I

    ACCT 3321 Intermediate Financial Accounting I
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2303
    This course aims at equipping students with the fundamental financial accounting concepts and techniques underlying the preparation and interpretation of financial statements of business organizations. It also covers the procedures involved in recording business transactions and events using the double-entry system, conceptual framework for financial reporting, codification of accounting standards, and the accounting for cash and receivables.

  • ACCT 3322 INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCT II

    ACCT 3322 Intermediate Financial Accounting II
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3311 or ACCT 3321
    This course focuses on in-depth study of the financial accounting concepts, practices and challenges of accounting for inventories, property, plant and equipment, depreciation, intangible assets, investments, current liabilities and contingencies, and non-current liabilities (bonds and notes).

  • ACCT 3322 INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCT II

    ACCT 3322 Intermediate Financial Accounting II
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3311 or ACCT 3321
    This course focuses on in-depth study of the financial accounting concepts, practices and challenges of accounting for inventories, property, plant and equipment, depreciation, intangible assets, investments, current liabilities and contingencies, and non-current liabilities (bonds and notes).

  • ACCT 3323 INTERMEDIATE FINANCE ACCT III

    ACCT 3323 Intermediate Financial Accounting III
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3312 or ACCT 3322
    This course is designed to examine the financial accounting concepts and their applications, and challenges of accounting for revenue recognition, leases, issue of stocks, dilutive securities and earnings per share, income tax, pensions and postretirement benefits, and accounting changes and error, and full disclosure in financial reporting.

  • ACCT 3323 INTERMEDIATE FINANCE ACCT III

    ACCT 3323 Intermediate Financial Accounting III
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3312 or ACCT 3322
    This course is designed to examine the financial accounting concepts and their applications, and challenges of accounting for revenue recognition, leases, issue of stocks, dilutive securities and earnings per share, income tax, pensions and postretirement benefits, and accounting changes and error, and full disclosure in financial reporting.

  • ACCT 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ACCT 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ACCT 4281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ACCT 4281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ACCT 4301 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING

    ACCT 4301 Advanced Accounting
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3323
    Study and application of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to specialized problems in mergers and acquisitions; consolidated financial reporting; partnership accounting; foreign currency transactions; foreign currency translation and remeasurements for reporting purposes. Study of GAAP for government and nonprofit entities, fund accounting and reporting practices.

  • ACCT 4302 AUDITING

    ACCT 4302 Auditing
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3317 and ACCT 3323
    Standards and procedures in making audits and examinations of the accounting records of business enterprises; preparation of work papers; the content and forms of qualified and unqualified auditor’s opinions; types of audits; ethics of the profession.

  • ACCT 4306 GOVERNMENT AND NONPROFIT

    ACCT 4306 Government and Nonprofit Accounting
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2303
    Application of financial accounting principles to governmental entities and nonprofit organizations; entails a detailed study of fund accounting and reporting practices. Requires proficiency in Microsoft Excel.

  • ACCT 4311 SPECIALIZED PROBLEMS

    ACCT 4311 Specialized Problems
    Prerequisites: ACCT 3303 and ACT 3321
    This course will cover the more complex problems in financial and managerial accounting not covered in ACCT 3303 Cost Accounting and ACCT 3321 Intermediate Financial Accounting I.

  • ACCT 4311 SPECIALIZED PROBLEMS

    ACCT 4311 Specialized Problems
    Prerequisites: ACCT 3303 and ACT 3321
    This course will cover the more complex problems in financial and managerial accounting not covered in ACCT 3303 Cost Accounting and ACCT 3321 Intermediate Financial Accounting I.

  • ACCT 4314 TAXATION:CORPORATIONS:ENTITIES

    ACCT 4314 Taxation for Corporations and Other Entities
    Prerequisite: ACCT 3304
    Federal income tax determination for corporations and the impact of decisions on the corporation and shareholders; tax issues relating to S corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts. Tax research is a substantial component of the course, representing one-third of the course content.

  • ACCT 4322 ADVANCED ADUITING ISSUES

    ACCT 4322 Advanced Auditing Issues
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 4302
    Corporate governance issues and the impact on the auditing profession and accounting disclosures, additional attestation requirements from auditors, other non-attestation engagements, internal audit and audit committees, compliance and government audit, and legal liability of accounts. The course includes a substantial research and writing component representing two-thirds of the course content.

  • ACCT 4337 FINANCIAL STMT ANALYSIS & VALU

    ACCT 4337 Financial Statement Analysis and Valuation
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3311 and MIS 3330 and FINA 3320
    Study and application of analytical tools and techniques for analyzing corporate financial statements and related information. Financial statement analysis enables the user to assess the operating, investing, and financing activities of the corporation in an industry context to make inferences regarding historical success as well as prospective profitability and cash flows.

  • ACCT 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ACCT 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ACCT 5302 AUDITING

    ACCT 5302 Auditing
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The study of standards and procedures in making audits and examinations of the accounting records of business enterprises; preparation of work papers; the content and forms of qualified and unqualified auditor’s opinions; types of audits; audit objectives, audit risk, materiality, and ethics of the profession.

  • ACCT 5311 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING

    ACCT 5311 Advanced Accounting
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3312
    Study and application of various methods under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to specialized problems in mergers and acquisitions; consolidated financial reporting; partnership accounting; foreign currency transactions; foreign currency translations, derivatives, hedge accounting and remeasurements for reporting purposes. This course provides an introduction to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

  • ACCT 5314 TAXATION:CORP/OTHER ENTITIES

    ACCT 5314 Taxation for Corporations and Other Entities
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3304
    The study of federal income tax issues pertinent to various business entities and their owners. Consideration is given to how federal tax law affects the formation and operation of Corporations, Partnerships, and S Corporations. Distributions to owners and the liquidation of these entities are also covered. Tax research is a substantial component of the course representing one-third of the course content.

  • ACCT 5322 ADVANCED AUDITING ISSUES

    ACCT 5322 Advanced Auditing Issues
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corporate governance issues and the impact on the auditing profession and accounting disclosures, additional attestation requirements from auditors, other non-attestation engagements, internal audit and audit committees, compliance and government audit, and legal liability of accounts.

  • ACCT 5360 SURVEY OF ACCOUNTING

    ACCT 5360 Survey of Accounting
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course covers the basics of what accounting information is, what it means, and how it is used. Students will examine financial statements and determine what they do and do not communicate. This knowledge will help gain decision-making and problem-solving abilities that are needed outside the classroom. The course introduces both financial and managerial accounting to provide an overall perspective about the introductory accounting topics and presentation. The course is also intended to help students learn how to become effective users of accounting information. As such, the course provides a balance between the preparer and the user points of view. The course includes coverage of legal and ethical issues facing accountants as well as highlighting international accounting differences. This course must be taken within the first 12 semester hours in the program. Graduate Business programs only.

  • ACCT 5362 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES

    ACCT 5362 Accounting Principles
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles and techniques of both financial and managerial accounting. It examines the procedures and processes involved in the preparation of basic financial statements and cost-related reports for managerial use. It also covers the application of these principles in evaluation, interpretation, and utilization of accounting information in credit, investment, strategic, organizational and operational decisions.

  • ACCT 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ACCT 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ACCT 6181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ACCT 6181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ACCT 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ACCT 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ACCT 6313 INTERNATIONAL ACCT ISSUES

    ACCT 6313 International Accounting Issues
    Prerequisite(s): None
    As global corporations span national boundaries, they must interact with many different accounting practices and systems. This course deals with a wide variety of international accounting issues, including, but not limited to, the different types of accounting standards in the Americas, Asia, and Europe; issues of reporting and disclosure; issues of foreign translation when considering financial statements; issues of standardizing and harmonizing financial reporting; issues of managerial planning and control; and ethical issues of international accounting. Graduate Business programs only.

  • ACCT 6320 ACCOUNTING THEORY SEMINAR

    ACCT 6320 Accounting Theory Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3321
    Study of current and alternative financial theories of measurement, valuation, and reporting, including relevant historical development. This readings course introduces the student to the body of literature that influenced the development and evolution of generally accepted accounting procedures.

  • ACCT 6320 ACCOUNTING THEORY SEMINAR

    ACCT 6320 Accounting Theory Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3321
    Study of current and alternative financial theories of measurement, valuation, and reporting, including relevant historical development. This readings course introduces the student to the body of literature that influenced the development and evolution of generally accepted accounting procedures.

  • ACCT 6322 ADVANCED AUDITING ISSUES

    ACCT 6322 ADVANCED AUDITING ISSUES
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Dean of the Archie W. Dunham College of Business.   

  • ACCT 6322 ADVANCED AUDITING ISSUES

    ACCT 6322 ADVANCED AUDITING ISSUES
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Dean of the Archie W. Dunham College of Business.   

  • ACCT 6345 TAX SEMINAR

    ACCT 6345 Tax Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 4314
    Research and casework related to current topics in federal income taxation are presented. Particular attention is given to planning for tax minimization.

  • ACCT 6345 TAX SEMINAR

    ACCT 6345 Tax Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 4314
    Research and casework related to current topics in federal income taxation are presented. Particular attention is given to planning for tax minimization.

  • ACCT 6347 SEMINAR IN MANAGERIAL ACCTNG

    ACCT 6347 Seminar In Managerial Accounting
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3303
    This course introduces principles and concepts of management accounting for strategic decision making and focuses on the use of managerial accounting information and its impact on business efficiency and effectiveness. Topics include management control, business unit evaluation, and strategic cost management. Also includes activity-based management, target costing, target pricing, balanced scorecard, and financial measures of performance.

  • ACCT 6347 SEMINAR IN MANAGERIAL ACCTNG

    ACCT 6347 Seminar In Managerial Accounting
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3303
    This course introduces principles and concepts of management accounting for strategic decision making and focuses on the use of managerial accounting information and its impact on business efficiency and effectiveness. Topics include management control, business unit evaluation, and strategic cost management. Also includes activity-based management, target costing, target pricing, balanced scorecard, and financial measures of performance.

  • ACCT 6348 COMM LAW & REGULATN FOR ACCTS

    ACCT 6348 Commercial Law and Regulation for Accountants
    Prerequisite(s): BUSA 2320
    This course is the study of professional and legal responsibilities and legal implications of business transactions, particularly as they relate to accounting and auditing, and the application of that knowledge to common business transactions. This course provides knowledge of general business environment and business concepts needed to understand the underlying business reasons for and accounting implications of transactions. Our primary objective in this class is to transfer the body of knowledge needed to answer questions likely to appear on the CPA, CMA, CIA, or other professional examinations and to provide a foundation of knowledge of business law for accountants.

  • ACCT 6348 COMM LAW & REGULATN FOR ACCTS

    ACCT 6348 Commercial Law and Regulation for Accountants
    Prerequisite(s): BUSA 2320
    This course is the study of professional and legal responsibilities and legal implications of business transactions, particularly as they relate to accounting and auditing, and the application of that knowledge to common business transactions. This course provides knowledge of general business environment and business concepts needed to understand the underlying business reasons for and accounting implications of transactions. Our primary objective in this class is to transfer the body of knowledge needed to answer questions likely to appear on the CPA, CMA, CIA, or other professional examinations and to provide a foundation of knowledge of business law for accountants.

  • ACCT 6352 ACCOUNTING FOR MANAGERS

    ACCT 6352 Accounting for Managers
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 5362 and ECON 5363
    The course covers accounting application and information relevant to managers in the current corporate environment. It includes analyzing corporate financial statements to assess the operating, investing, and financing activities of the corporation in an industry context; internal accounting topics like C-V-P analysis; decision-making and budgeting. Topics relevant to a public company like the IPO process and SEC filings will also be covered. The course includes coverage of legal and ethical issues facing accountants as well as highlighting international accounting differences. Graduate Business Programs only.

  • ACCT 6365 INTEGRATING ACCT & FINA

    ACCT 6365 Integrating Accounting and Finance for New Ventures
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course focuses on the integration of models and constructs from managerial accounting and corporate financial management – developing perspectives and applications specifically for entrepreneurs engaged in new venture development. The objective is to equip entrepreneurs with an exceptional working knowledge of accounting and finance matters directly related to managing an emerging firm. Topics include: a) detailed financial ration analysis of the balance sheet and income statement, b) a comprehensive understanding of the time value of money – using both a financial analyst calculator and computer spreadsheets, c) pro forma modeling of cash flows, assets, debt, and equity, d) capital budgeting – net present value [NPV], internal rate of return [IRR], and benefit-to-cost ratios [B:C], e) tax accounting issues for C-corporation, Subchapter-S, and LLC venture structures, f) Sources and Uses of Funds budgeting, and g) investor capitalization and valuation techniques for privately-held companies.

  • ACCT 6365 INTEGRATING ACCT & FINA

    ACCT 6365 Integrating Accounting and Finance for New Ventures
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course focuses on the integration of models and constructs from managerial accounting and corporate financial management – developing perspectives and applications specifically for entrepreneurs engaged in new venture development. The objective is to equip entrepreneurs with an exceptional working knowledge of accounting and finance matters directly related to managing an emerging firm. Topics include: a) detailed financial ration analysis of the balance sheet and income statement, b) a comprehensive understanding of the time value of money – using both a financial analyst calculator and computer spreadsheets, c) pro forma modeling of cash flows, assets, debt, and equity, d) capital budgeting – net present value [NPV], internal rate of return [IRR], and benefit-to-cost ratios [B:C], e) tax accounting issues for C-corporation, Subchapter-S, and LLC venture structures, f) Sources and Uses of Funds budgeting, and g) investor capitalization and valuation techniques for privately-held companies.

  • ACCT 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ACCT 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ACCT 6390 SEMINAR IN ACCOUNTING RESEARCH

    ACCT 6390 Seminar in Accounting Research
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Independent instructor-guided research in accounting topics of current interest. Research areas may include financial accounting, cost accounting, auditing, and taxation.

  • ACCT 6390 SEMINAR IN ACCOUNTING RESEARCH

    ACCT 6390 Seminar in Accounting Research
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Independent instructor-guided research in accounting topics of current interest. Research areas may include financial accounting, cost accounting, auditing, and taxation.

  • AFSC 1201 FOUNDATIONS OF THE USAF I

    AFSC 1201 FOUNDATIONS OF THE USAF I
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at University of Houston.   

  • AFSC 1202 FOUNDATIONS OF THE USAF II

    AFSC 1202 FOUNDATIONS OF THE USAF II
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at University of Houston.   

  • AFSC 2201 EVOLUTION OF AIR POWER I

    AFSC 2201 EVOLUTION OF AIR POWER I
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at University of Houston.   

  • AFSC 2202 EVOLUTION OF AIR POWER II

    AFSC 2202 EVOLUTION OF AIR POWER II
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at University of Houston.   

  • AFSC 3301 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP I

    AFSC 3301 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP I
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at University of Houston.   

  • AFSC 3302 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP II

    AFSC 3302 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP II
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at University of Houston.   

  • AFSC 3801 FIELD TRAINING

    AFSC 3801 FIELD TRAINING
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at University of Houston.   

  • AFSC 4301 NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS I

    AFSC 4301 NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS I
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at University of Houston.   

  • AFSC 4302 NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS II

    AFSC 4302 NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS II
    For course description and prerequisite(s) for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at University of Houston.   

  • APOL 3301 TEST EVERYTHING: LEWIS/SCHAEFF

    APOL 3301 Worldview Apologetics: ‘Testing Everything’ with C.S. Lewis & Francis Schaeffer
    Prerequisite(s): Junior/Senior Standing or Instructor’s Approval
    The course begins with a focused, in-depth reading of Lewis and Schaeffer. Then it examines thinkers who serve as models of how to extend and apply, or revise and modify, their apologetics arguments, and may include works by Nancy Pearcey, Alvin Plantinga, Herman Dooyeweerd, J. Richard Pearcey, Albert Wolters, Mark Noll, George Marsden, Gene Edward Veith, and many others, enriched by shorter readings such as articles, book excerpts, and primary source documents.

  • APOL 3302 SURVIVE & THRIVE AT UNIVERSITY

    APOL 3302 Worldview Apologetics: Surviving and Thriving at the University
    Prerequisite(s): Junior/Senior Standing or Instructor’s Approval
    This course provides students with tools to analyze the prevailing secular theories across a variety of fields, to think critically about underlying assumptions, and to argue persuasively for a credible Christian perspective. The course gives a worldview introduction to several subject areas, which may include math, english, science, business, political philosophy, the arts & humanities. Readings include books specific to each of the subject areas, enriched by shorter readings such as articles, book excerpts, and primary source documents.

  • APOL 3303 APOLOGETICS FOR EVERYONE

    APOL 3303 Apologetics for Everyone
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of the contemporary approaches to apologetics, including philosophical apologetics, cultural apologetics, and biblical apologetics. The course will also introduce students to some contemporary issues in apologetics, such as the relationship between science and faith, and common challenges to traditional Christian ethics.

  • APOL 3304 SCRIPTURE AND APOLOGETICS

    APOL 3304 Scripture and Apologetics
    Prerequisite(s): CHRI 1301
    A course designed to introduce students to biblical apologetics, including an analysis of contemporary methods of biblical criticism, views of the inspiration of scripture, defense of the trustworthiness of the scriptural narratives, and the historicity of the resurrection.

  • APOL 3381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    APOL 3381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • APOL 4301 APOLOGETICS COMMUNICATION

    APOL 4301 Apologetics Communication
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A practical course designed to help students develop the ability to communicate effectively through public speaking, social media, interpersonal communication, popular writing, and debate.

  • APOL 4302 SCIENCE AND FAITH

    APOL 4302 Science and Faith
    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1313
    This course will examine the relationship between science and faith, including an examination of the reasons for a perceived tension between the two in modern history, and various models for how the two can be mutually enriching.

  • APOL 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    APOL 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • APOL 5050 SPIRITUAL FORMATION I

    APOL 5050 Spiritual Formation I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    One part of a four-course series to facilitate students’ intellectual and spiritual formation as apologists and foster prayer and mutual support and encouragement. Students will participate in a weekly group discussion, facilitated by the SF instructor, on topics such as current issues in apologetics, faculty and student research, graduate student life, prayer, spiritual reading, and the spiritual disciplines. Part of the four-semester sequence of Spiritual Formation courses. Students must take all four courses but may do so in any order. Courses are pass/fail based on participation.

  • APOL 5060 SPIRITUAL FORMATION II

    APOL 5060 Spiritual Formation II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    One part of a four-course series to facilitate students’ intellectual and spiritual formation as apologists and foster prayer and mutual support and encouragement. Students will participate in a weekly group discussion, facilitated by the SF instructor, on topics such as current issues in apologetics, faculty and student research, graduate student life, prayer, spiritual reading, and the spiritual disciplines. Part of the four-semester sequence of Spiritual Formation courses. Students must take all four courses but may do so in any order. Courses are pass/fail based on participation.

  • APOL 5111 MENTORED MINISTRY

    APOL 5111 Mentored Ministry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An internship in a ministry program. HBU faculty will provide oversight and mentorship in partnership with a ministry. Can be taken multiple times for credit.

  • APOL 5181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    APOL 5181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • APOL 5181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    APOL 5181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • APOL 5211 MENTORED MINISTRY

    APOL 5211 Mentored Ministry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An internship in a ministry program. HBU faculty will provide oversight and mentorship in partnership with a ministry. Can be taken multiple times for credit.

  • APOL 5281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    APOL 5281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • APOL 5310 APOLOGETICS RESEARCH/WRITING

    APOL 5310 Apologetics Research and Writing
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A practical course designed to develop graduate-level writing and reading skills and introduce students to writing in the discipline of apologetics. The course will focus on developing a robust drafting, writing and revision process; using primary and secondary source materials; writing with clarity and correctness; and writing for both academic and popular audiences. Readings will introduce students to both philosophical and cultural apologetics.

  • APOL 5311 MENTORED MINISTRY

    APOL 5311 Mentored Ministry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An internship in a ministry program. HBU faculty will provide oversight and mentorship in partnership with a ministry. Can be taken multiple times for credit.

  • APOL 5315 EVANGELISM FOR EVERYONE

    APOL 5315 Evangelism for Everyone
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introductory study of personal evangelism designed to equip students to understand their cultural context, to share the gospel naturally and effectively, and to respond appropriately to issues raised as they communicate their faith in Christ.

  • APOL 5320 PHIL. OF RELIGION:FAITH/REASON

    APOL 5320 Philosophy of Religion: Faith & Reason
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will deal with basic issues in philosophy of religion, such as: theistic arguments, the problem of evil, the relationship between faith and reason, miracles, and life after death. (Offered as PHIL 5320.)

  • APOL 5325 INTRODUCTION TO MISSIONS

    APOL 5325 Introduction to Missions
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course of study is designed to introduce the student to the biblical, theological, historical, and practical basis for Christian missions. Special attention will be given to current practices and contemporary issues related to global missions.

  • APOL 5330 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY AND CULTURE

    APOL 5330 Ancient Philosophy and Culture
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Christianity was shaped by Jewish, Roman, and Greek cultural forces. This class will examine the Classical heritage of the Faith. Class will survey ancient philosophy, theater, and poetry. Course will survey texts such as Theogony, Odyssey, Bacchae, Frogs, Republic, Aeneid, and Metamorphosis to examine the roots of contemporary Western Christian faith.

  • APOL 5340 MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY & CULTURE

    APOL 5340 Medieval Philosophy & Culture
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of the ideas, cultural developments, and literature of Medieval Europe, from the Fall of Rome to the beginning of the Renaissance. The course will cover topics such as the medieval Christian contribution to science, philosophy, art, and education; the rise of Islam and the Christian response; and the integration of faith and reason as expressed in medieval literature, art, and philosophy.

  • APOL 5350 MODERN & POST-MODERN CULTURE

    APOL 5350 Modern and Postmodern Culture
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An exploration of ideas and cultural developments from the 16th Century to the present, focusing especially on the relationship between reason and faith, the cultural consequences of modernity, and the apologetics challenges and opportunities of the present day. Students will read philosophical, cultural, and literary texts by a range of authors, including some non-Christians. Apologetics topics include issues such as doubt and suffering; pro-life issues; sexuality and marriage; and the integration of reason and imagination into apologetics.

  • APOL 5360 FILM, VISUAL ARTS, APOLOGETICS

    APOL 5360 Film, the Visual Arts, and Apologetics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An exploration of the potential of film and visual art for use in apologetics, focusing on the principles of interpreting artworks, especially with regard to discerning the worldviews embodied in particular artworks and using artworks to foster dialogue on apologetics issues.

  • APOL 5370 C.S. LEWIS/IMAGINATIVE APOL

    APOL 5370 C. S. Lewis and Imaginative Apologetics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    C. S. Lewis is the most influential public apologist of the 20th century, and his influence continues to grow. This course will explore Lewis’s thought as expressed in his fiction, poetry, apologetics, and/or academic works, and assess his contribution to the work of imaginative apologetics.

  • APOL 5380 MERE CHRISTIAN THEO/APOL

    APOL 5380 ‘Mere Christian’ Theology and Apologetics Implications
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An examination of the rational coherence of core Christian doctrines, including the Trinity, the Incarnation, and the Resurrection. Other topics may include Christian Exclusivism, Substitutionary Atonement, Heaven and Hell, etc.

  • APOL 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    APOL 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • APOL 6050 SPIRITUAL FORMATION III

    APOL 6050 Spiritual Formation III
    Prerequisite(s): None
    One part of a four-course series to facilitate students’ intellectual and spiritual formation as apologists and foster prayer and mutual support and encouragement. Students will participate in a weekly group discussion, facilitated by the SF instructor, on topics such as current issues in apologetics, faculty and student research, graduate student life, prayer, spiritual reading, and the spiritual disciplines. Part of the four-semester sequence of Spiritual Formation courses. Students must take all four courses but may do so in any order. Courses are pass/fail based on participation.

  • APOL 6060 SPIRITUAL FORMATION IV

    APOL 6060 Spiritual Formation IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    One part of a four-course series to facilitate students’ intellectual and spiritual formation as apologists and foster prayer and mutual support and encouragement. Students will participate in a weekly group discussion, facilitated by the SF instructor, on topics such as current issues in apologetics, faculty and student research, graduate student life, prayer, spiritual reading, and the spiritual disciplines. Part of the four-semester sequence of Spiritual Formation courses. Students must take all four courses but may do so in any order. Courses are pass/fail based on participation.

  • APOL 6310 APOLOGETICS COMMUNICATION

    APOL 6310 Apologetics Communication
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A practical course designed to develop techniques used in interpersonal, group, public, social media and other mass communication settings. The focus will be on developing individual ability to communicate Christian thought for effective engagement with culture.

  • APOL 6320 SCIENCE AND FAITH

    APOL 6320 Science and Faith
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will explore the history of the relationship between science and religion, including the alleged hostility between the two. It will examine various accounts of the compatibility between the two and ways they can be understood as mutually enriching. Other topics in the philosophy of science and how they interact with theism may be considered. (Offered also as PHIL 6320.)

  • APOL 6321 PHIL OF HIST & RESURRECTION

    APOL 6321 Philosophy of History and the Resurrection
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Philosophical assumptions affecting the study of history will be examined and dealing explicitly with miraculous occurrences, and most especially, evidences for the resurrection of Christ.

  • APOL 6322 PHILOSOPHICAL THEOLOGY

    APOL 6322 Philosophical Theology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A rigorous examination of the coherence of theism that addresses the Biblical justification and the proper conceptual formulation (or qualification) of divine attributes such as incorporeality, necessary existence, aseity, eternality, simplicity, omnipotence, omniscience, divine goodness and moral perfection, and the philosophical formulation of historically orthodox doctrines of the Trinity, the Incarnation, justification and the Atonement, divine creation and providence, the nature of the Eucharist, the nature of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, and questions of individual and universal eschatology.

  • APOL 6323 FRAMEWORKS & ISSUES

    APOL 6323 Philosophical Apologetics: Frameworks and Issues
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to different apologetic methodologies and kinds of argument used in the defense of the Christian faith. The relative merits of classical apologetics/natural theology, evidentialism, presuppositionalism, reformed epistemology, and cumulative case methodologies will be discussed while addressing theistic arguments relying on reason, natural and historical evidences, revelation, and subjective religious experience.

  • APOL 6324 THEISTIC ARGUMENTS

    APOL 6324 Theistic Arguments
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An examination of the nature of theistic proofs that focuses on rigorous consideration of various theistic arguments from the standpoint of modern analytic philosophy of religion. Cosmological arguments, teleological arguments, ontological arguments, arguments from providence, moral arguments, arguments from consciousness, arguments from religious experience, arguments from miracles and historical evidences, prudential arguments (e.g., Pascal’s wager), and more may be considered.

  • APOL 6325 THEISTIC ETHICS & MORAL APOL

    APOL 6325 Theistic Ethics and Moral Apologetics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Various arguments grounding objective morality in the existence of God will be considered, as will various forms of the moral argument for God’s existence. The nature of divine moral perfection and the dialectic among divine love, mercy and justice may be considered, along with the philosophical problem of evil and moral tensions in the Bible (animal sacrifices, capital punishment for non-capital offenses, the Canaanite conquest, etc.).

  • APOL 6330 WORLD RELIGIONS

    APOL 6330 World Religions
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course exploring world religions and the Christian response to them. Particular emphasis will be on the way in which one can engage participants in non-Christian religions and communicate Christian thought in various cultures.

  • APOL 6331 LDRSHP/EVNGLSM LOCAL CHURCH

    APOL 6331 Leadership and Evangelism in the Local Church
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will study strategies for increasing the effectiveness of evangelism training and outreach in the context of the local church.

  • APOL 6332 EVANGELISM THRU SMALL GROUPS

    APOL 6332 Evangelism Through Small Groups
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This class will train students to facilitate small groups designed to help non-Christians work through their spiritual questions, make biblical discoveries, and move toward faith in Christ. It will also examine strategies for churches and ministries to leverage evangelistic small groups to impact their communities.

  • APOL 6333 APOL/EVANGLSM IN PRACTICE

    APOL 6333 Apologetics and Evangelism in Practice
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This advanced course in apologetics and evangelism will train students to incorporate apologetics in evangelism. It will be heavily focused on examining individual and institutional case studies.

  • APOL 6336 MISSIONAL CHURCH PLANTING

    APOL 6336 Missional Church Planting
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This advanced course in church planting addresses the biblical basis, missiological principles, and methods necessary for planting domestic and cross-cultural churches, with an emphasis on the cultural context.

  • APOL 6340 EASTERN PHILOSOPHY/CULTURE

    APOL 6340 Eastern Philosophy and Culture
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course exploring Eastern philosophy and culture and the Christian response to them. Particular emphasis will be on the way in which one can engage participants in non-Christian religions and communicate Christian thought in various cultures.

  • APOL 6350 PROBLEM OF EVIL

    APOL 6350 The Problem of Evil
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will examine the problem of evil as a challenge to theistic and Christian belief, and explore different responses to the challenge, both classic and contemporary.

  • APOL 6370 LITERATURE & APOLOGETICS

    APOL 6370 Literature and Apologetics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An exploration of the use of literature in apologetics, focusing on the theory and practice of imagination as a mode of knowing and communicating truth. Theoretical perspectives will include those of C.S. Lewis, George MacDonald, and J.R.R. Tolkien. Other materials will include a range of classic and contemporary texts that explore theological themes in both fictional and non-fictional modes, by Christian and even occasionally by non-Christian authors.

  • APOL 6375 CREATIVE WRITING/APOLOGETICS

    APOL 6375 Creative Writing and Apologetics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is an exploration of the practice of creative writing as a mode of cultural apologetics. Students will read and analyze classic and contemporary texts with regard to genre, form, style, and technique, and will write and workshop their own creative pieces, including poetry, fiction, and literary nonfiction, culminating in a critical reflection and portfolio. The course will also include theoretical perspectives on creative writing as a mode of imaginative apologetics. Other topics that may be covered include publication options, multi-media creative writing, and writing for children and young adults.

  • APOL 6380 SCRIPTURE & APOL. IMPLICATIONS

    APOL 6380 Scripture and Apologetics Implications
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey and evaluation of contemporary methods of biblical criticism and their implications for the authority of scripture, the historical reliability of scriptural narratives, and the doctrine of inspiration.

  • APOL 6390 THESIS

    APOL 6390 Thesis
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course, which should be taken in the final semester of the program as a culminating project, focuses on independent research and writing to produce a thesis. The course is designed for students who intend to go on to a doctoral program or do academic research and publication in the field of apologetics.

  • ARAM 4310 BIBLICAL ARAMAIC

    ARAM 4310 Biblical Aramaic
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 2312 and HEBR 2322 and HEBR 3311
    An introduction to the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of biblical Aramaic designed to give the students the skills necessary for translation and interpretation of the Aramaic portions of the Bible.

  • ARAM 5310 ARAMAIC GRAMMAR I

    ARAM 5310 Biblical Aramaic
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 5301 and HEBR 5302 and HEBR 6301
    An introduction to the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of biblical Aramaic designed to give the students the skills necessary for translation and interpretation of the Aramaic portions of the Bible.

  • ARAM 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ARAM 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ARHS 5319 STRUCTURES OF POETRY

    ARHS 5319 Structures of Poetry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Structures of Poetry teaches students to read poetry thoughtfully, accurately, and wisely. Students who are experienced with reading poetry will emerge from this course as capable readers. Students who have read much poetry will emerge from this course with a much fuller understanding for the way a poem functions.

  • ARHS 5328 THE HOLOCAUST: AFTER 50 YEARS

    ARHS 5328 The Holocaust: After 50 Years
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Students read poetry, fiction, personal narratives, and essays that reflect the Holocaust experience. Through their reading and research papers, a visit to the Holocaust Museum, and viewing films, students come to understand the history of anti-Semitism and how it culminated in the greatest crime against humanity of the 20th century. Students also consider subsequent genocides and discuss whether or not the hope Never again can ever be realized.

  • ARHS 5340 EXPRESSIONISM AND THE ARTS

    ARHS 5340 Expressionism and the Arts
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will examine the expressive aspects of the Hellenistic, Baroque, and Romantic eras, but will emphasize the artistic movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries known as Expressionism. Emphasis will be on the European and American experience.

  • ARHS 5382 THE GREEK WORLD

    ARHS 5382 The Greek World
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the world of Ancient Greece. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and archaeological contexts, and to consider their impact on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and Thucydides.

  • ARHS 5383 THE ROMAN WORLD

    ARHS 5383 The Roman World
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the world of Ancient Rome. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of the Republican and Imperial periods, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and archaeological contexts, to understand the interrelationship between the Greek and Roman worlds, to discuss the emergence of Christianity in its classical context, and to consider the impact of Ancient Rome on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Vergil, Cicero, Lucretius, Horace, Plautus, Terrence, Suetonius, Tacitus, and Pliny.

  • ARHS 5384 THE MEDIEVAL WORLD

    ARHS 5384 The Medieval World
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the Medieval World. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of the Medieval period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and architectural contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity and the emergence of Christian Europe, and to consider the impact of the Medieval period on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Boethius, Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, Bede and Chaucer.

  • ARHS 5385 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION

    ARHS 5385 The Renaissance and Reformation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the period of the Renaissance and Reformation. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of the Reformation period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity, the middle ages, and the emergence of early modern Europe, and to consider the impact of the Renaissance and Reformation on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Luther, Calvin, Machiavelli, Erasmus, Petrarch, Shakespeare, Milton and Donne.

  • ARHS 5386 THE ENLIGHTENMENT

    ARHS 5386 The Enlightenment
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the period of the Enlightenment. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of the Enlightenment period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, scientific and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity, the scientific revolution, and the emergence of representative democracy, and to consider the impact of the Enlightenment on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Locke, Hobbes, Pope, Swift, Austen, Voltaire, Rousseau and Kant.

  • ARHS 5387 THE MODERN WORLD

    ARHS 5387 The Modern World
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the period of Romanticism and Modernity. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of Romanticism and Modernism, to place them in their historical, philosophical, scientific, and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Romanticism and Modernism, and to consider the impact of these movements on the post-modern world. Authors read in this class may include: Goethe, Wordsworth, Nietzsche, Eliot, Einstein and Beckett.

  • ARHS 5388 THE LAST FIFTY YEARS

    ARHS 5388 The Last Fifty Years
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to recent developments in western civilization. Special attention will be given to Postmodernism and how has it influenced American culture. The goals of the course are: to examine the critical moral, political, economic, and social questions of the 20th century, and to understand the connection between this period and those that have preceded it. Special attention will be given to primary source readings.

  • ARHS 5390 WESTERN CULTURE/HUMAN EXP I

    ARHS 5390 Western Culture and Human Experience
    Prerequisite(s): None
    These courses are a core component of the MLA program and offer a broad overview of history, politics, art, and philosophy. MLA 5390 will cover the years from the time of classical Greece through the medieval period; MLA 5391 will cover the Renaissance, Reformation, and Early Modern period; MLA 5392 will cover from the French revolution through Modern times.

  • ARHS 5391 WESTERN CULTURE/HUMAN EXP II

    ARHS 5391 Western Culture and Human Experience II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course offers a broad overview of history, politics, art, and philosophy. MFA 5391 will cover the Renaissance, Reformation, and Early Modern periods.

  • ARHS 5392 WESTERN CULTURE/HUMAN EXP III

    ARHS 5392 Western Culture and Human Experience II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    MFA 5392 offers a broad overview of history, politics, art, and philosophy. The course will cover the period from the French revolution through Modern times.

  • ARHS 5393 TURNING PTS OF 19TH CENTURY

    ARHS 5393 Turning Points of the 19th Century
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores turning points and upheavals in Europe in the context of the post-Industrial Revolution. The course covers Romanticism and Realism, leading to rebellious movements in the art world, including Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, and beginnings of Expressionism at the turn of the century. Attention is also given to the formation of fine arts academies and the acceleration of art production in the late 19th century.

  • ARHS 5393 TURNING PTS OF 19TH CENTURY

    ARHS 5393 Turning Points of the 19th Century
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores turning points and upheavals in Europe in the context of the post-Industrial Revolution. The course covers Genre painting and Realism, leading to rebellious movements in the art world, including Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, and beginnings of Expressionism at the turn of the century. Attention is also given to the formation of fine arts academies and the acceleration of art production in the late 19th century.

  • ARHS 5394 SHARPING MODERNISM

    ARHS 5394 Shaping Modernism
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course begins at the turn of the 20th century and continues into the 1930’s. The art world is seen through the lens of the political and societal effects of the World Wars. The material investigates the ideas and impact of important Modern Art movements, including Expressionism, Dada, Futurism, Surrealism, Cubism, as well as art for art’s sake (Whistler), the Vienna Secession (Klimt), and Fauvism (Matisse). Special attention will also be given to International Exhibition of Modern Art in 1913, which would become the first Armory show.

  • ARHS 5394 SHARPING MODERNISM

    ARHS 5394 Sharping Modernism
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course begins at the turn of the 20th century and continues into the 1930’s. The art world is seen through the lens of the political and societal effects of the World Wars. The material investigates the ideas and impact of important Modern Art movements, including Expressionism, Dada, Futurism, Surrealism, Cubism, as well as art for art’s sake (Whistler), the Vienna Secession (Klimt), and Fauvism (Matisse). Special attention will also be given to International Exhibition of Modern Art in 1913, which would become the first Armory show.

  • ARHS 6324 THE ART OF BEING HUMAN

    ARHS 6324 The Art of Being Human
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is an introduction to the humanities. It reaffirms the liberal arts tradition that maintains that the humanities constitute the best and brightest expressions of all people. The emphasis is on the interaction between the arts, religion, and philosophy, and on the humanities, believing that this approach helps us to see artists and philosophers at work, trying to solve real problems that we all know about.

  • ARHS 6375 VAN GOGH/POST IMPRESSIONIST MV

    ARHS 6375 Van Gogh and the Post-Impressionist Movement
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course deals with the major formative phase of the modern movement in art. Both Impressionist and Post Impressionist styles and artists will be examined. The focus of the course is concerned with the expressive and lively paintings of this modern master. His style will be traced from his early days in this native Holland, through his contact with the Impressionists in Paris, to his final days in Southern France.

  • ARHS 6376 MICHELANGELO AND LEONARDO

    ARHS 6376 Michelangelo and Leonardo
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is concerned with a study of the art of two of the great masters of the High Renaissance in Italy–Michelangelo Buonarroti and Leonardo da Vinci. These two great individuals, who have had a tremendous impact in western culture from their own times through our own era, will be studied through a variety of their works.

  • ARHS 6377 CONTEMPORARY ART MOVEMENTS

    ARHS 6377 Contemporary Art Movements
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide an overview of the major visual art movements of the 20th century and to extend an investigation into the current art scene. An introduction will begin with study of the influence of late 19th century movements such as Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and Art Noveau.

  • ARHS 6378 THE GOTHIC CATHEDRAL

    ARHS 6378 The Gothic Cathedral
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the architectural development of the Christian Basilica from the middle of the twelfth through the sixteenth century. The Gothic Cathedral is an enduring symbol of the Middle Ages and provides one of the most important links between ancient and modern times.

  • ARHS 6385 MODERN ARCHITECTURE

    ARHS 6385 Modern Architecture
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide an overview of the major developments of architecture of the 20th century pioneers. The study will include the following: the innovations of the tall buildings in America, the Bauhaus in Germany, the development of major masters of the 20th century, and new forms from new materials. An important objective of the course is to explore current architects and their contemporary efforts, and a substantial part of the course will include an investigation of the architecture of the metropolitan Houston area.

  • ARHS 6386 ART IMPRESSIONISM

    ARHS 6386 Art Impressionism
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to cover the movement of Impressionism in art during the latter part of the 19th century. It is recognized as the beginning point of the modern era in art. Works by the major artists of the group to be examined include Degas, Monet, Manet, Renoir, and Pissaro.

  • ARHS 6392 MODERN MASTERS – PICASSO

    ARHS 6392 Modern Masters – Picasso
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course consists of a thorough study of the life and art of the twentieth-century master artist, Pablo Picasso. His long and productive career is studied in the context of the complex arena of twentieth century art.

  • ARHS 6393 THE NEW & THE AVANT-GARDE

    ARHS 6393 The New and the Avant-Garde
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course begins with a shift in Western Art from Paris to New York and the end of WWII. New international collectives in art and architecture begin to form in Europe and the US, including constructivism and Suprematism, the Bauhaus, as well as avant-garde methods of Abstraction and Color Field Painting. The Neo-Dada group, Fluxus, and other global art collectives are formed in the postwar era. American artists gain momentum and begin to form historical 20th century art movements impacted by a postwar economic boom, the beginning of the Civil Rights Movements, and the Cold War.

  • ARHS 6393 THE NEW & THE AVANT-GARDE

    ARHS 6393 The New and the Avant-Garde
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course begins with a shift in Western Art from Paris to New York and the end of WWII. New international collectives in art and architecture begin to form in Europe and the US, including constructivism and Suprematism, the Bauhaus, as well as avant-garde methods of Abstraction and Color Field Painting. The Neo-Dada group, Fluxus, and other global art collectives are formed in the postwar era. American artists gain momentum and begin to form historical 20th century art movements impacted by a postwar economic boom, the beginning of the Civil Rights Movements, and the Cold War.

  • ARHS 6394 POSTMODERN TO PRESENT

    ARHS 6394 Postmodern to Present
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course recognizes the effect of global communication and mass production in the postmodern world. With particular focus on the United States, the course includes the larger movements of Abstract Expressionism in the 1950’s, leading to Pop Art of the 1960’s, followed by Minimalism, Feminism, Earthworks, Performance Art, Public Art, and the current climate of globalization in the 21st Century. The course will also connect this recent past to our more local present, by including special attention to exhibitions and artworks in Houston’s art spaces, as well as current events in media with discussion on how today’s working artists are both part of history and making new history.

  • ARHS 6394 POSTMODERN TO PRESENT

    ARHS 6394 Postmodern to Present
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course recognizes the effect of global communication and mass production in the postmodern world. With particular focus on the United States, the course includes the larger movements of Abstract Expressionism in the 1950’s, leading to Pop Art of the 1960’s, followed by Minimalism, Feminism, Earthworks, Performance Art, Public Art, and the current climate of globalization in the 21st Century. The course will also connect this recent past to our more local present, by including special attention to exhibitions and artworks in Houston’s art spaces, as well as current events in media with discussion on how today’s working artists are both part of history and making new history.

  • ART 1303 ART METHODS AND MATERIALS

    ART 1303 Art Methods and Materials
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introductory course concerned with basic art techniques and materials. The student will become acquainted with processes and the materials of painting, drawing, printing, sculpture, and ceramics.

  • ART 1313 2D DESIGN

    ART 1313 2D Design
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this introductory course, the student makes a thorough study of the principles and elements of design and visual devices that make up a work of art. By means of two and three-dimensional problems, students make personal application of these concepts.

  • ART 1323 3D DESIGN

    ART 1323 3D Design
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this more advanced course, the student continues with a thorough study of the principles and elements of design and visual devices that make up a work of art. By means of two and three-dimensional problems, students make personal application of these concepts.

  • ART 2099 SOPH PORTFOLIO-GRAPHIC DESIGN

    ART 2099 Sophomore Portfolio – Graphic Design
    Prerequisite(s): ART 1303 and ART 1313 and ART 2380 and ART 2394 and ART 2397 and ART 2380 and CNMA 1310 and CNMA 3330
    Students will complete a preliminary Graphic Design portfolio to be reviewed with faculty in preparation for the remaining requirements within the degree plan. Upon successful completion of this portfolio review, students are eligible to file a Graphic Design degree plan.

  • ART 2099 SOPH PORTFOLIO-GRAPHIC DESIGN

    ART 2099 Sophomore Portfolio – Graphic Design
    Prerequisite(s): ART 1303 and ART 1313 and ART 2380 and ART 2394 and ART 2397 and ART 2380 and CNMA 1310 and CNMA 3330
    Students will complete a preliminary Graphic Design portfolio to be reviewed with faculty in preparation for the remaining requirements within the degree plan. Upon successful completion of this portfolio review, students are eligible to file a Graphic Design degree plan.

  • ART 2181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ART 2181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ART 2343 ART APPRECIATION

    ART 2343 Art Appreciation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides a comparative analysis of various modes of expression in all of the visual arts through description and evaluation. Emphasis is made upon historical movements, language, media, and stylistic identity. The survey is designed to prompt the student to see art as a personal experience and to respond more sensitively to the visual arts in a cultural context.

  • ART 2372 WATER MEDIA – PAINTING I

    ART 2372 Water Media – Painting I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    During this course students will be introduced to the use and development of water media techniques, both transparent and opaque. These courses will serve as preparatory for upper level painting classes both advanced and experimental.

  • ART 2380 PRINTMAKING I: BASIC

    ART 2380 Printmaking I: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course begins a series of introductory experiences to printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will introduce the student to a broad understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 2381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ART 2381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ART 2384 SCULPTURE I: BASIC

    ART 2384 Sculpture I: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this course emphasis is placed on beginning a basic understanding of three-dimensional design problems and an initial exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 2387 LIFE DRAWING I: BASIC

    ART 2387 Life Drawing I: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2394
    This figure drawing class is a basic introduction to the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

  • ART 2391 CERAMICS I: BASIC

    ART 2391 Ceramics I: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this introductory course, students work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation with glaze formulation, glazing, firing and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 2394 DRAWING I: BASIC

    ART 2394 Drawing I: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to basic exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with an emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 2397 PAINTING I:BASIC

    ART 2397 Painting I: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This introduction to studio experiences course is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 3305 ART:SECONDARY SCHOOL

    ART 3305 Art for the Secondary School
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the HBU Educator Preparation Program
    This course involves the production of art using media and processes considered appropriate for middle school and senior high school art programs. Emphasis is placed on combining technique, exploration of media and interrelation of art appreciation with art activities.

  • ART 3330 GALLERY AND MUSEUM PRACTICES

    ART 3330 Gallery and Museum Practices
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course allows students a hands-on participation of fine arts gallery management and a formal study of museum operations. Students study major art facilities in Houston and collectively organize an art exhibition as part of their course of study.

  • ART 3331 GALLERY AND MUSEUM PRACTICES

    ART 3331 Gallery and Museum Practices
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course allows students a hands-on participation of fine arts gallery management and a formal study of museum operations. Students study major art facilities in Houston and collectively organize an art exhibition as part of their course of study.

  • ART 3332 GALLERY AND MUSEUM PRACTICES

    ART 3332 Gallery and Museum Practices
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course allows students a hands-on participation of fine arts gallery management and a formal study of museum operations. Students study major art facilities in Houston and collectively organize an art exhibition as part of their course of study.

  • ART 3335 COLOR THEORY

    ART 3335 Color Theory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introductory course concerned with basic art techniques and materials of the study of color. The student will become acquainted with processes and the materials of understanding and applying color theory. The course will first develop the vocabulary of color followed by the construction of the color wheel and other significant color structure formations. A major part of the course will be dedicated to the studio application of painting, drawing and design color applications by the students. The course will include the following applications of color studies: vocabulary of color, theories of color, applying color theory, color wheels, naming colors, three attributes of color, mixing of color, moving from theory to practice, using value of color, using intensity of color, using harmony of color, color in nature, symbolism of color, and creating a personal palette of color.

  • ART 3353 HISTORY:ART:PREHISTORIC-GOTHIC

    ART 3353 History of Art: Prehistoric through Gothic
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Painting, sculpture and architecture are reflections of man’s thinking (social, religious, and political) and the means through which he has sought to satisfy needs common to man of every age. The unique contribution made by each culture toward our art heritage is stressed along with influences of one culture on another.

  • ART 3355 EXPERIMENTAL DRAWING

    ART 3355 Experimental Drawing
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2394 or ART 2395 or ART 2396
    Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to Art majors only.

  • ART 3363 HIST:ART: RENAISSANCE-MODERN

    ART 3363 History of Art: Renaissance through Modern
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Beginning with the sixteenth century, this course traces the development of modern art movements. Stylization, social factors, and important innovations that shape the destiny of man and his arts will be considered.

  • ART 3370 PRINTMAKING II: BASIC

    ART 3370 Printmaking II: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2380
    This course begins a more refined experience of learning printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more developed understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 3372 WATER MEDIA-PAINTING II

    Art 3372 Water Media – Painting II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    During this course students will have an intermediate experience in the use and development of water media techniques, both transparent and opaque. These courses will serve as preparatory for upper level painting classes both advanced and experimental.

  • ART 3373 HISTORY OF MODERN ART

    ART 3373 History of Modern Art
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is an overview of the development of the visual arts during the latter part of the nineteenth through the entire twentieth century. Beginning with the Post-Impressionist movement in Europe and continuing through the multitude of ‘isms’ of the twentieth century, the study will progress to the present day Avant Garde ideas of the art world. Modern art masters such as Matisse, Picasso, Duchamp, Pollock, and Rothko will be a focus of the course. Movements such as Cubism, Abstract Expressionism, Dadaism, Pop Art, and Avant Gardism will be presented as each flows through the entirety of the modern movement.

  • ART 3374 PRINTMAKING II: INTERMEDIATE

    Art 3374 Printmaking II: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2380
    This course continues a more refined experience of learning printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more developed understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 3375 ART OF THE RENAISSANCE

    ART 3375 Art of the Renaissance
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Michelangelo, Leonardo, and Raphael created art in one of the most fascinating historical and artistic periods in Western culture, the High Renaissance. From debunking the Da Vinci code to treasure hunting for Bruegel’s proverbs, this course not only focuses on some of the world’s greatest achievements in art and the individuals responsible for making them, it sets the stage for art in Western culture for centuries to come.

  • ART 3376 PRINTMAKING II: ADVANCED

    ART 3376 Printmaking II: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2380
    This course concludes a more refined experience of learning printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more developed understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 3380 AMERICAN ART

    ART 3380 American Art
    Prerequisite(s): None
    From New York to Los Angeles, from Native America to Jackson Pollock, this course traverses the US geographically, philosophically and socially in search of major influences on and developments in American Art. Students will explore art made outside the European canon and develop an awareness and appreciation for the American heritage in artistic production.

  • ART 3381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ART 3381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ART 3383 EUROPEAN HERITAGE:ART HISTORY

    ART 3383 European Heritage in Art History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will occur during art study in Europe such as the Artis Study abroad program in Florence. Students will be based in Florence where they will attend daily walking lectures at most of the churches, museums and galleries of Florence. On site lectures will be held five or more days a week and will vary each day depending on the site visited. Renaissance is the major area studied through students electing a side trip to Germany during the month stay in Florence will also encounter contemporary art. During this study abroad semester students will record detailed journal notes from each daily lecture.

  • ART 3384 SCULPTURE II: BASICS

    Art 3384 Sculpture II: Basics
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2384
    In this course emphasis is placed on beginning a refined understanding of many three-dimensional design problems and continuing to explore various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 3385 EXPERIMENTAL DRAWING

    ART 3385 Experimental Drawing
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2394
    Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to art majors only.

  • ART 3386 SCULPTURE II: INTERMEDIATE

    Art 3386 Sculpture II: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2384
    In this course, emphasis is placed on continuing to develop a refined understanding of many three-dimensional design problems and continuing to explore various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 3387 LIFE DRAWING II: BASIC

    ART 3387 Life Drawing II: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2387
    This figure drawing class introduces a more developed experience of the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

  • ART 3388 LIFE DRAWING II: REFINED

    ART 3388 Life Drawing II: Refined
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2387
    This figure drawing class continues with a more developed experience of the following techniques, skills and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, and oil studies.

  • ART 3389 SCULPTURE II: ADVANCED

    ART 3389 Sculpture II: Applied
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2384
    In this course, emphasis is placed on accomplishing a refined understanding of many three-dimensional design problems and continuing to explore various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 3391 CERAMICS II: BASIC

    ART 3391 Ceramics II: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2391
    In this refined skills level course, students begin to mature in their work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation with glaze formulation, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 3392 CERAMICS II: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 3392 Ceramics II: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2391
    In this second refined skills level course, students continue to mature in their work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 3393 CERAMICS II: ADVANCED

    ART 3393 Ceramics II: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2391
    In this third refined skills level course, students continue to mature in their work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 3394 DRAWING II: BASIC

    ART 3394 Drawing II: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2394
    This course introduces students to a more refined series of drawing exercises using various media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 3395 DRAWING II: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 3395 Drawing II: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2394
    This course continues to guide students through a series of refined drawing exercises using various media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 3396 DRAWING II: ADVANCED

    ART 3396 Drawing II: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2394
    This course completes the refined series of drawing exercise using various media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 3397 PAINTING II: BASIC

    ART 3397 Painting II: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2397
    This course begins a series of more refined studio experiences. It is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 3398 PAINTING II: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 3398 Painting II: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2397
    This course continues a series of more refined studio experiences. It is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 3399 PAINTING II: ADVANCED

    ART 3399 Painting II: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2397
    This course concludes a series of more refined studio experiences. It is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ART 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ART 4361 APPRENTICESHIP I:ADV STUDIO

    ART 4361 Apprenticeship I: Advanced Studio
    Prerequisite(s): Advanced Studio Art (Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Water Media) course at either the 3000 or 4000 level
    The HBU Art Apprenticeship Program is an art studio concentration for individual art students who are accepted on an individual basis to do academic work in an apprentice capacity with one of the artist-in-residence members of the faculty. The students will be accepted into the program by invitation from the department chairman upon a review of the student’s portfolio and academic records by the department’s artists-in-residence. Upon acceptance into the program, the student will work toward individual semester hours designed as Apprenticeship credit hours.

  • ART 4362 APPRENTICESHIP II:ADV STUDIO

    ART 4362 Apprenticeship II: Advanced Studio
    Prerequisite(s): Advanced Studio Art (Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Water Media) course at either the 3000 or 4000 level.
    The HBU Art Apprenticeship Program is an art studio concentration for individual art students who are accepted on an individual basis to do academic work in an apprentice capacity with one of the artist-in-residence members of the faculty. The students will be accepted into the program by invitation from the department chairman upon a review of the student’s portfolio and academic records by the department’s artists-in-residence. Upon acceptance into the program, the student will work toward individual semester hours designed as Apprenticeship credit hours.

  • ART 4363 APPRENTICESHIP III:ADV STUDIO

    ART 4363 Apprenticeship III: Advanced Studio
    Prerequisite(s): Advanced Studio Art (Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Water Media) course at either the 3000 or 4000 level
    The HBU Art Apprenticeship Program is an art studio concentration for individual art students who are accepted on an individual basis to do academic work in an apprentice capacity with one of the artist-in-residence members of the faculty. The students will be accepted into the program by invitation from the department chairman upon a review of the student’s portfolio and academic records by the department’s artists-in-residence. Upon acceptance into the program, the student will work toward individual semester hours designed as Apprenticeship credit hours.

  • ART 4364 EXPERIMENTAL PAINTING

    ART 4364 Experimental Painting
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2397 and (ART 3397 or ART 3398 or ART 3399)
    Directed study of a minimum of thirty hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to Art majors only.

  • ART 4372 WATER MEDIA-PAINTING III

    ART 4372 Water Media – Painting III
    Prerequisite(s): None
    During this course, students will have an advanced experience in the use and development of water media techniques, both transparent and opaque. These courses will serve as preparatory for upper-level painting classes–both advanced and experimental.

  • ART 4380 PRINTMAKING III: BASIC

    ART 4380 Printmaking III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3370 or ART 3374 or ART 3376
    This course begins the final more complex series of printmaking learning experiences. Students in this course will start to apply more highly developed printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more sophisticated understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ART 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ART 4382 PRINTMAKING III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4382 Printmaking III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3370 or ART 3374 or ART 3376
    This course continues the final more complex series of printmaking learning experiences. Students in this course will apply more highly developed printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more sophisticated understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 4383 PRINTMAKING III: ADVANCED

    ART 4383 Printmaking III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3370 or ART 3374 or ART 3376
    This course completes the final more complex series of printmaking learning experiences. Students in this course will apply more highly developed printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more sophisticated understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 4384 SCULPTURE III: BASIC

    ART 4384 Sculpture III: Basics
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3384 or ART 3386 or ART 3389
    In this course, students begin to develop a more advanced understanding of the many three-dimensional design problems associated with sculpture. Students will continue their exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 4385 SCULPTURE III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4385 Sculpture III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3384 or ART 3386 or ART 3389
    In this course, students continue to develop a more advanced understanding of the many three-dimensional design problems associated with sculpture. Students will continue their exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 4386 SCULPTURE III: ADVANCED

    ART 4386 Sculpture III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3384 or ART 3386 or ART 3389
    In this course, students complete a more advanced understanding of the many three-dimensional design problems associated with sculpture. Students will continue their exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 4387 LIFE DRAWING III: BASIC

    ART 4387 Life Drawing III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3387 and ART 3388
    This figure drawing introduces students to an advanced experience with the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

  • ART 4388 LIFE DRAWING III: REFINED

    ART 4388 Life Drawing III: Refined
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3387 and ART 3388
    This figure drawing class completes the advanced experience with the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

  • ART 4390 CERAMICS III: BASIC

    ART 4390 Ceramics III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3391 or ART 3392 or ART 3393
    In this first advanced course, students begin to produce more complex work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing and search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 4391 CERAMICS III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4391 Ceramics III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3391 or ART 3392 or ART 3393
    In this second advanced course, students carry on with more complex work using hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 4392 SENIOR SEMINAR:STUDIO

    ART 4392 Senior Seminar: Studio
    Prerequisite(s): See Senior Seminar note in Undergraduate Degree Requirements in the HBU Catalog.
    This course provides a format for the production of a body of art works in a studio setting. The student will go through a process in which s/h presents a written document presenting the proposal for the body of works, the process by which the works are to be made or produced, and the aesthetic ideas which are the basis of the works. Part of the research includes meeting with the entire Art faculty for the purpose of enriching the possibilities for the chosen media. The final grade will be determined by a jury of the entire Art faculty.

  • ART 4393 CERAMICS III: ADVANCED

    ART 4393 Ceramics III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3391 or ART 3392 or ART 3393
    In this third advanced course, students complete complex work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation concludes with glaze formulations, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 4394 DRAWING III: BASIC

    ART 4394 Drawing III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3398 or ART 3395 or ART 3396
    This course begins the final series of drawing courses. This course introduces students to more complex exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 4395 DRAWING III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4395 Drawing III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3394 or ART 3395 or ART 3396
    This course continues the final series of drawing courses. Students in this course will work on more complex drawing exercises using various media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 4396 DRAWING III: ADVANCED

    ART 4396 Drawing III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3398 or ART 3395 or ART 3396
    This course completes the final series of drawing courses. Students in this course will continue to work on complex drawing exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 4397 PAINTING III: BASIC

    ART 4397 Painting III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3397 or ART 3398 or ART 3399
    This course begins the more complex series of studio experiences based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 4398 PAINTING III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4398 Painting III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3397 or ART 3398 or ART 3399
    This course continues the more complex series of studio experiences based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 4399 PAINTING III:ADVANCED

    ART 4399 Painting III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3397 or ART 3398 or ART 3399
    This course concludes the more complex series of studio experiences based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 4461 APPRENTICESHIP I:ADV STUDIO

    ART 4461 Apprenticeship I: Advanced Studio
    Prerequisite(s): Advanced Studio Art (Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Water Media) course at either the 3000 or 4000 level
    The HBU Art Apprenticeship Program is an art studio concentration for individual art students who are accepted on an individual basis to do academic work in an apprentice capacity with one of the artist-in-residence members of the faculty. The students will be accepted into the program by invitation from the department chairman upon a review of the student’s portfolio and academic records by the department’s artists-in-residence. Upon acceptance into the program, the student will work toward individual semester hours designed as Apprenticeship credit hours.

  • ART 4462 APPRENTICESHIP II:ADV STUDIO

    ART 4462 Apprenticeship II: Advanced Studio
    Prerequisite(s): Advanced Studio Art (Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Water Media) course at either the 3000 or 4000 level.
    The HBU Art Apprenticeship Program is an art studio concentration for individual art students who are accepted on an individual basis to do academic work in an apprentice capacity with one of the artist-in-residence members of the faculty. The students will be accepted into the program by invitation from the department chairman upon a review of the student’s portfolio and academic records by the department’s artists-in-residence. Upon acceptance into the program, the student will work toward individual semester hours designed as Apprenticeship credit hours.

  • ART 4463 APPRENTICESHIP III:ADV STUDIO

    ART 4463 Apprenticeship III: Advanced Studio
    Prerequisite(s): Advanced Studio Art (Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Water Media) course at either the 3000 or 4000 level
    The HBU Art Apprenticeship Program is an art studio concentration for individual art students who are accepted on an individual basis to do academic work in an apprentice capacity with one of the artist-in-residence members of the faculty. The students will be accepted into the program by invitation from the department chairman upon a review of the student’s portfolio and academic records by the department’s artists-in-residence. Upon acceptance into the program, the student will work toward individual semester hours designed as Apprenticeship credit hours.

  • ART 4464 EXPERIMENTAL PAINTING

    ART 4464 Experimental Painting
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2397 and (ART 3397 or ART 3398 or ART 3399)
    Directed study of a minimum of thirty hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to Art majors only.

  • ART 4472 WATER MEDIA-PAINTING III

    ART 4472 Water Media – Painting III
    Prerequisite(s): None
    During this course, students will have an advanced experience in the use and development of water media techniques, both transparent and opaque. These courses will serve as preparatory for upper-level painting classes–both advanced and experimental.

  • ART 4480 PRINTMAKING III: BASIC

    ART 4480 Printmaking III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3370 or ART 3374 or ART 3376
    This course begins the final more complex series of printmaking learning experiences. Students in this course will start to apply more highly developed printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more sophisticated understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 4481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ART 4481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ART 4481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ART 4481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ART 4482 PRINTMAKING III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4482 Printmaking III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3370 or ART 3374 or ART 3376
    This course continues the final more complex series of printmaking learning experiences. Students in this course will apply more highly developed printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more sophisticated understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 4483 PRINTMAKING III: ADVANCED

    ART 4483 Printmaking III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3370 or ART 3374 or ART 3376
    This course completes the final more complex series of printmaking learning experiences. Students in this course will apply more highly developed printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more sophisticated understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

  • ART 4484 SCULPTURE III: BASIC

    ART 4484 Sculpture III: Basics
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3384 or ART 3386 or ART 3389
    In this course, students begin to develop a more advanced understanding of the many three-dimensional design problems associated with sculpture. Students will continue their exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 4485 SCULPTURE III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4485 Sculpture III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3384 or ART 3386 or ART 3389
    In this course, students continue to develop a more advanced understanding of the many three-dimensional design problems associated with sculpture. Students will continue their exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 4486 SCULPTURE III: ADVANCED

    ART 4486 Sculpture III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3384 or ART 3386 or ART 3389
    In this course, students complete a more advanced understanding of the many three-dimensional design problems associated with sculpture. Students will continue their exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

  • ART 4487 LIFE DRAWING III: BASIC

    ART 4487 Life Drawing III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3387 and ART 3388
    This figure drawing introduces students to an advanced experience with the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

  • ART 4488 LIFE DRAWING III: REFINED

    ART 4488 Life Drawing III: Refined
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3387 and ART 3388
    This figure drawing class completes the advanced experience with the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

  • ART 4491 CERAMICS III: BASIC

    ART 4491 Ceramics III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3391 or ART 3392 or ART 3393
    In this first advanced course, students begin to produce more complex work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing and search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 4492 CERAMICS III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4492 Ceramics III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3391 or ART 3392 or ART 3393
    In this second advanced course, students carry on with more complex work using hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 4493 CERAMICS III: ADVANCED

    ART 4493 Ceramics III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3391 or ART 3392 or ART 3393
    In this third advanced course, students complete complex work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation concludes with glaze formulations, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

  • ART 4494 DRAWING III: BASIC

    ART 4494 Drawing III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3398 or ART 3395 or ART 3396
    This course begins the final series of drawing courses. This course introduces students to more complex exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 4495 DRAWING III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4495 Drawing III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3394 or ART 3395 or ART 3396
    This course continues the final series of drawing courses. Students in this course will work on more complex drawing exercises using various media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 4496 DRAWING III: ADVANCED

    ART 4496 Drawing III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3398 or ART 3395 or ART 3396
    This course completes the final series of drawing courses. Students in this course will continue to work on complex drawing exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student’s ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

  • ART 4497 PAINTING III: BASIC

    ART 4497 Painting III: Basic
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3397 or ART 3398 or ART 3399
    This course begins the more complex series of studio experiences based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 4498 PAINTING III: INTERMEDIATE

    ART 4498 Painting III: Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3397 or ART 3398 or ART 3399
    This course continues the more complex series of studio experiences based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 4499 PAINTING III:ADVANCED

    ART 4499 Painting III: Advanced
    Prerequisite(s): ART 3397 or ART 3398 or ART 3399
    This course concludes the more complex series of studio experiences based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

  • ART 5311 GRADUATE PAINTING I

    ART 5311 Graduate Painting I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Graduate painting students will, in this introductory course, use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 5312 GRADUATE PAINTING II

    ART 5312 Graduate Painting II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Graduate painting students will, in this second level course, continue in their use of a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 5313 GRADUATE PAINTING III

    ART 5313 Graduate Painting III
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5311 and ART 5312
    Graduate painting students will, in this third level course, become more adept with a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 5314 GRADUATE PAINTING IV

    ART 5314 Graduate Painting IV
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5311 and ART 5312
    Graduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus on the development of an interdisciplinary professional discourse and creating works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor. These critical thoughts lead towards the implementation of content and processes in the artists’ work. When developed the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any professional artist will be fully achieved.

  • ART 5321 GRADUATE DRAWING I

    ART 5321 Graduate Drawing I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will introduce students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, drawing ability, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 5322 GRADUATE DRAWING II

    ART 5322 Graduate Drawing II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will continue to introduce students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 5323 GRADUATE DRAWING III

    ART 5323 Graduate Drawing III
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5321 and ART 5322
    Students in this course will begin to become more adept in the use of processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 5324 GRADUATE DRAWING IV

    ART 5324 Graduate Drawing IV
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5321 and ART 5322
    This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 5331 GRADUATE CERAMICS I

    ART 5331 Graduate Ceramics I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course in Ceramics will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing, and hand-building. The course will combine experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. Student’s work will begin to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

  • ART 5332 GRADUATE CERAMICS II

    ART 5332 Graduate Ceramics II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course in Ceramics will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing, and hand-building. The course will combine experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. Student’s work will continue to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

  • ART 5333 GRADUATE CERAMICS III

    ART 5333 Graduate Ceramics III
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5331 and ART 5332
    This course in Ceramics will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing, and hand-building. The course will combine experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. Student’s work will begin to develop a more mature thematic focus by the end of the semester.

  • ART 5334 GRADUATE CERAMICS IV

    ART 5334 Graduate Ceramics IV
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5331 and ART 5332
    This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student’s work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

  • ART 5341 GRADUATE SCULPTURE I

    ART 5341 Graduate Sculpture I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to learn how to translate drawings into 3-dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of drawing skills along with sculpture processes both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards the student’s thesis content.

  • ART 5342 GRADUATE SCULPTURE II

    ART 5342 Graduate Sculpture II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to learn how to translate drawings into 3-dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of drawing skills along with sculpture processes both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards the student’s thesis content.

  • ART 5343 GRADUATE SCULPTURE III

    ART 5343 Graduate Sculpture III
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5341 and ART 5342
    In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to learn how to translate drawings into 3-dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of drawing skills along with sculpture processes both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards the student’s thesis content.

  • ART 5344 GRADUATE SCULPTURE IV

    ART 5344 Graduate Sculpture IV
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5341 and ART 5342
    In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to learn how to translate drawings into 3-dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of drawing skills along with sculpture processes both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards the student’s thesis content.

  • ART 5351 GRADUATE PRINTMAKING I

    ART 5351 Graduate Printmaking I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

  • ART 5352 GRADUATE PRINTMAKING II

    ART 5352 Graduate Printmaking II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will allow a student to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printmaking, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content.

  • ART 5353 GRADUATE PRINTMAKING III

    ART 5353 Graduate Printmaking III
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5351 and ART 5352
    This course will allow a student to continue to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content.

  • ART 5354 GRADUATE PRINTMAKING IV

    ART 5354 Graduate Printmaking IV
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5351 and ART 5352
    This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

  • ART 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ART 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ART 6315 GRADUATE PAINTING V

    ART 6315 Graduate Painting V
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5311 and ART 5312 and ART 5313 and ART 5314
    Graduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus on the development of an interdisciplinary professional discourse and creating works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor. These critical thoughts lead towards the implementation of content and processes in the artists’ work. When developed the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any professional artist will be fully achieved.

  • ART 6316 GRADUATE PAINTING VI

    ART 6316 Graduate Painting VI
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5311 and ART 5312 and ART 5313 and ART 5314
    Graduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus on the development of an interdisciplinary professional discourse and creating works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor. These critical thoughts lead towards the implementation of content and processes in the artists’ work. When developed the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any professional artist will be fully achieved.

  • ART 6317 GRADUATE PAINTING VII

    ART 6317 Graduate Painting VII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5311 and ART 5312 and ART 5313 and ART 5314 and ART 6315 and ART 6316
    Graduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus on the development of an interdisciplinary professional discourse and creating works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor. These critical thoughts lead towards the implementation of content and processes in the artists’ work. When developed the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any professional artist will be fully achieved.

  • ART 6318 GRADUATE PAINTING VIII

    ART 6318 Graduate Painting VIII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5311 and ART 5312 and ART 5313 and ART 5314 and ART 6315 and ART 6316
    Graduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus on the development of an interdisciplinary professional discourse and creating works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor. These critical thoughts lead towards the implementation of content and processes in the artists’ work. When developed the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any professional artist will be fully achieved.

  • ART 6325 GRADUATE DRAWING V

    ART 6325 Graduate Drawing IV
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5321 and ART 5322 and ART 5323 and ART 5324
    This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 6326 GRADUATE DRAWING VI

    ART 6326 Graduate Drawing VI
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5321 and ART 5322 and ART 5323 and ART 5324
    This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 6327 GRADUATE DRAWING VII

    ART 6327 Graduate Drawing VII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5321 and ART 5322 and ART 5323 and ART 5324 and ART 6325 and ART 6326
    This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 6328 GRADUATE DRAWING VIII

    ART 6328 Graduate Drawing VIII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5321 and ART 5322 and ART 5323 and ART 5324 and ART 6325 and ART 6326
    This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 6335 GRADUATE CERAMICS V

    ART 6335 Graduate Ceramics V
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5331 and ART 5332 and ART 5333 and ART 5334
    This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student’s work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

  • ART 6336 GRADUATE CERAMICS VI

    ART 6336 Graduate Ceramics VI
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5331 and ART 5332 and ART 5333 and ART 5334
    This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student’s work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

  • ART 6337 GRADUATE CERAMICS VII

    ART 6337 Graduate Ceramics VII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5331 and ART 5332 and ART 5333 and ART 5334 and ART 6335 and ART 6336
    This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student’s work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

  • ART 6338 GRADUATE CERAMICS VIII

    ART 6338 Graduate Ceramics VIII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5331 and ART 5332 and ART 5333 and ART 5334 and ART 6335 and ART 6336
    This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student’s work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

  • ART 6345 GRADUATE SCULPTURE V

    ART 6345 Graduate Sculpture V
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5341 and ART 5342 and ART 5343 and ART 5344
    In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student’s thesis content.

  • ART 6346 GRADUATE SCULPTURE VI

    ART 6346 Graduate Sculpture VI
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5341 and ART 5342 and ART 5343 and ART 5344
    In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student’s thesis content.

  • ART 6347 GRADUATE SCULPTURE VII

    ART 6347 Graduate Sculpture VII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5341 and ART 5342 and ART 5343 and ART 5344 and ART 6345 and ART 6346
    In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student’s thesis content.

  • ART 6348 GRADUATE SCULPTURE VIII

    ART 6348 Graduate Sculpture VIII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5341 and ART 5342 and ART 5343 and ART 5344 and ART 6345 and ART 6346
    In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student’s thesis content.

  • ART 6352 GRADUATE DRAWING V

    ART 6352 Graduate Drawing V
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5321 and ART 5322 and ART 5323 and ART 5324
    This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, conté combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing etc. Students will be expected to continue their development toward a for classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

  • ART 6355 GRADUATE PRINTMAKING V

    ART 6355 Graduate Printmaking V
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5351 and ART 5353 and ART 5353 and ART 5354
    This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

  • ART 6356 GRADUATE PRINTMAKING VI

    ART 6356 Graduate Printmaking VI
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5351 and ART 5352 and ART 5353 and ART 5354
    This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

  • ART 6357 GRADUATE PRINTMAKING VII

    ART 6357 Graduate Printmaking VII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5351 and ART 5352 and ART 5353 and ART 5354 and ART 6355 and ART 6356
    This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

  • ART 6358 GRADUATE PRINTMAKING VIII

    ART 6358 Graduate Printmaking VIII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5351 and ART 5352 and ART 5353 and ART 5354 and ART 6355 and ART 6356
    This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

  • ART 6361 GRAD GALLERY/MUSEUM PRACTICE I

    ART 6361 Graduate Gallery and Museum Practices I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This Gallery and Museum Practices course will begin to introduce the MFA student to a conceptual and practical understanding of art exhibitions and their importance in the careers of visual artists, as well as their contributions to contemporary society. Visits to Houston area museums and galleries will be an important component of this course. Lectures will be offered on the history of fine art venues from the late 19th century to the present.

  • ART 6362 GRAD GALLERY/MUSEUM PRAC II

    ART 6362 Graduate Gallery and Museum Practices II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This Gallery and Museum Practices course will provide the MFA student with a conceptual and practical understanding of art exhibitions and their importance in the careers of visual artists, as well as their contributions to contemporary society. Visits to Houston area museums and galleries will be an important component of this course. Lectures will be offered on the history of fine art venues from the late 19th century to the present.

  • ART 6363 GRAD GALLERY/MUSEUM PRAC III

    ART 6363 Graduate Gallery and Museum Practices III
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This Gallery and Museum Practices course will provide the MFA student with a more sophisticated conceptual and practical understanding of art exhibitions and their importance in the careers of visual artists, as well as their contributions to contemporary society. Visits to Houston area museums and galleries will be an important component of this course. Lectures will be offered on the history of fine art venues from the late 19th century to the present.

  • ART 6364 GRAD GALLERY/MUSEUM PRAC IV

    ART 6364 Graduate Gallery and Museum Practices IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This Gallery and Museum Practices course will provide the MFA student with a more sophisticated conceptual and practical understanding of art exhibitions and their importance in the careers of visual artists, as well as their contributions to contemporary society. Visits to Houston area museums and galleries will be an important component of this course. Lectures will be offered on the history of fine art venues from the late 19th century to the present.

  • ART 6365 EXPER DIGIT METHD/MATERIALS V

    ART 6365 Graduate Experimental Digital Methods and Materials V
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5361 and ART 5362 and ART 5363 and ART 5364
    These courses will enhance the fine arts studio experience by integrating experimental digital tools. Starting with simple and practical image editing and correction, the student quickly branches out into using the computer as another important tool in creating art. Course topics may include: working with digital photography, digital drawing and painting, 3D software, sound art, video art and the technology behind installation art. The students will research the history of movements within digital art (Generative Art, glitch, Datamoshing, etc.) They will explore the virtual tools and materials that state-of-the-art digital media has to offer. These cutting-edge programs (including Painter, Illustrator, Photoshop, After Effects, Ableton Live, etc.) provide an amazing variety of flexible and expressive possibilities. These digital studio courses are designed to integrate with the hands-on studio experience. Opening new dynamic, creative directions for the student as they develop their thesis.

  • ART 6366 EXPER DIGIT METHD/MATERIALS VI

    ART 6366 Graduate Experimental Digital Methods and Materials VI
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5361 and ART 5362 and ART 5363 and ART 5364
    These courses will enhance the fine arts studio experience by integrating experimental digital tools. Starting with simple and practical image editing and correction, the student quickly branches out into using the computer as another important tool in creating art. Course topics may include: working with digital photography, digital drawing and painting, 3D software, sound art, video art and the technology behind installation art. The students will research the history of movements within digital art (Generative Art, glitch, Datamoshing, etc.) They will explore the virtual tools and materials that state-of-the-art digital media has to offer. These cutting-edge programs (including Painter, Illustrator, Photoshop, After Effects, Ableton Live, etc.) provide an amazing variety of flexible and expressive possibilities. These digital studio courses are designed to integrate with the hands-on studio experience. Opening new dynamic, creative directions for the student as they develop their thesis.

  • ART 6367 EXPER DIGIT METHD/MATRIALS VII

    ART 6367 Graduate Experimental Digital Methods and Materials VII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5361 and ART 5362 and ART 5363 and ART 5364 and ART 6365 and ART 6366
    These courses will enhance the fine arts studio experience by integrating experimental digital tools. Starting with simple and practical image editing and correction, the student quickly branches out into using the computer as another important tool in creating art. Course topics may include: working with digital photography, digital drawing and painting, 3D software, sound art, video art and the technology behind installation art. The students will research the history of movements within digital art (Generative Art, glitch, Datamoshing, etc.) They will explore the virtual tools and materials that state-of-the-art digital media has to offer. These cutting-edge programs (including Painter, Illustrator, Photoshop, After Effects, Ableton Live, etc.) provide an amazing variety of flexible and expressive possibilities. These digital studio courses are designed to integrate with the hands-on studio experience. Opening new dynamic, creative directions for the student as they develop their thesis.

  • ART 6368 EXPER DIGIT METHD/MATERLS VIII

    ART 6368 Graduate Experimental Digital Methods and Materials VIII
    Prerequisite(s): ART 5361 and ART 5362 and ART 5363 and ART 5364 and ART 6365 and ART 6366
    These courses will enhance the fine arts studio experience by integrating experimental digital tools. Starting with simple and practical image editing and correction, the student quickly branches out into using the computer as another important tool in creating art. Course topics may include: working with digital photography, digital drawing and painting, 3D software, sound art, video art and the technology behind installation art. The students will research the history of movements within digital art (Generative Art, glitch, Datamoshing, etc.) They will explore the virtual tools and materials that state-of-the-art digital media has to offer. These cutting-edge programs (including Painter, Illustrator, Photoshop, After Effects, Ableton Live, etc.) provide an amazing variety of flexible and expressive possibilities. These digital studio courses are designed to integrate with the hands-on studio experience. Opening new dynamic, creative directions for the student as they develop their thesis.

  • ART 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ART 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ART 6388 WRITING ABOUT ART

    ART 6388 Writing About Art
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The Master of Fine Arts course Writing About Art explores written documents and taped interviews by modern and contemporary artists and critics. This course differs from those that explore art historical movements in that a primary focus is on the written and verbal statements by individual artists whether or not they agree with art historical canons. The writings are an extension of the visual artist’s studio life, with the course being organized to explore the artist as correspondent, aesthetic statesman, critic, and collaborator. MFA students will be required to keep a journal of their own writings, as well as participate in the seminar style discussions of the assigned readings.

  • ART 6399 THESIS/PORTFOLIO PREPARATION

    ART 6399 Graduate Thesis/ Portfolio Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    All MFA graduate studio majors will, in this course, coordinate their thesis writing and body of art created during their MFA period of study preparing both for their Thesis MFA professional exhibition. Each student will work with their graduate committee chair, as primary instructor for this final seminar course during their last semester. The professor and candidate will work together to ensure the best possible portfolio development. Work that has already been started relating to the student’s individual thesis writing and creative oeuvre will be coordinated and edited during the duration of this course. Satisfactory approval of both the Art faculty and the UAC Gallery director are needed prior to any MFA thesis exhibition, public MFA presentation lecture and oral thesis defense.

  • BCMB 3014 MICROBIOLOGY LAB

    BCMB 3014 Microbiology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BCMB 3414

    This is the laboratory portion of BCMB 3414.

  • BCMB 3375 HUMAN GENETICS

    BCMB 3375 Human Genetics
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of human genetics and its molecular and clinical implications. Topics include the chromosomal, molecular, and biochemical basis of disease, prenatal diagnosis, and genetic counseling. (Offered also as BIOL 3375.)

  • BCMB 3414 MICROBIOLOGY

    BCMB 3414 Microbiology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BCMB 3014

    This course is a general survey of the microorganisms and includes the morphology, physiology, and control of the organisms most important to humans. The microbiology of soil, food, water, and disease will be considered. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BIOL 3414.)

  • BCMB 4024 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LAB

    BCMB 4024 Molecular Biology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BCMB 4424

    This is the laboratory portion of BCMB 4424.

  • BCMB 4044 VIROLOGY LAB

    BCMB 4044 Virology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BCMB 4444

    This is the laboratory portion of BCMB 4444.

  • BCMB 4048 MOLECULAR GENETICS LABORATORY

    BCMB 4048 Molecular Genetics Laboratory
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444; Corequisite: BCMB 4448
    This is the laboratory portion of BCMB 4448.

  • BCMB 4048 MOLECULAR GENETICS LABORATORY

    BCMB 4048 Molecular Genetics Laboratory
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444; Corequisite: BCMB 4448
    This is the laboratory portion of BCMB 4448.

  • BCMB 4064 IMMUNOLOGY LAB

    BCMB 4064 Immunology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BCMB 4464

    This is the laboratory portion of BCMB 4464.

  • BCMB 4081 SPECIAL TOPICS: LABORATORY

    BCMB 4081 Special Topics: Laboratory

  • BCMB 4081 SPECIAL TOPICS: LABORATORY

    BCMB 4081 Special Topics: Laboratory

  • BCMB 4111 BIOANALYTICAL METHODS

    BCMB 4111 Bioanalytical Methods
    Prerequisite(s): Twenty hours of Biology or BCMB at the 2000 level or above, and CHEM 2415 and CHEM 2416 and CHEM 3131 and CHEM 3132 and CHEM 3313 and CHEM 3333, and completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 4373
    This course is a senior level course which exposes students to the principles and experimental techniques underlying common bioanalytical methods such as cell fractionation, radiolabeling, protein purification, protein and DNA sequencing, immunochemistry, and spectrophotometry, all of which are widely used in research pertaining to the biological and biochemical sciences.

  • BCMB 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BCMB 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BCMB 4272 INTEGRATING BIOLOGICAL CONCEPT

    BCMB 4272 Integrating Biological Concepts
    Prerequisite(s): Biology Core courses (BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3414 and BIOL 3444)
    This course will integrate the knowledge, theories, and skills expected of a Biologist. Topics will encompass and reinforce the material found in the courses of the Biology Core.

  • BCMB 4281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BCMB 4281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BCMB 4297 RESEARCH:BIOCHEM/MOLE BIOL

    BCMB 4297 Research in Biochemistry/Molecular Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3414 and BIOL 3444
    Laboratory research is offered for a student majoring in Biochemistry-Molecular biology. At the conclusion of the research, a written paper will be presented to the student’s seminar advisor and an oral presentation of the results will be presented. (Offered also as BIOL 4297.)

  • BCMB 4324 ADVANCED CELL BIOLOGY

    BCMB 4324 Advanced Cell Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    This course provides an in-depth study of selected dynamic processes that occur in living cells. Topics include DNA regulation and expression of genes; DNA repair; protein synthesis and function; protein sorting; vesicular traffic; cell signaling; and control of cell division. (Offered also as BIOL 4324.)

  • BCMB 4335 RNA BIOLOGY

    BCMB 4335 RNA Biology
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    This course investigates the diverse structures and roles of RNA molecules in living cells. Both historical and current research on RNA and its varied functions will be covered. Topics include RNA with enzymatic function, cellular production and processing of RNA, regulatory RNA molecules, RNA splicing and splice defects, long non-coding RNA (IncRNA) and RNA localization within cells. (Offered also as BIOL 4335.)

  • BCMB 4335 RNA BIOLOGY

    BCMB 4335 RNA Biology
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    This course investigates the diverse structures and roles of RNA molecules in living cells. Both historical and current research on RNA and its varied functions will be covered. Topics include RNA with enzymatic function, cellular production and processing of RNA, regulatory RNA molecules, RNA splicing and splice defects, long non-coding RNA (IncRNA) and RNA localization within cells. (Offered also as BIOL 4335.)

  • BCMB 4363 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY

    BCMB 4363 Medical Microbiology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3414
    A study of microbial organisms that cause disease in humans. The characteristics of each pathogen are discussed along with its pathogenesis and pathology. (Offered also as BIOL 4363.)

  • BCMB 4375 CANCER BIOLOGY

    BCMB 4375 Cancer Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3414
    This course examines the development of cancer at the cellular and molecular levels. Topics covered include tumor suppressors, oncogenes, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, telomerase, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Cancer prevention, screen, diagnosis, and treatment will also be introduced. (Offered also as BIOL 4375.)

  • BCMB 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BCMB 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BCMB 4424 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

    BCMB 4424 Molecular Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BCMB 4024

    This course presents recent developments in biotechnology and genetic engineering. Topics included are recombinant DNA; DNA cloning; DNA sequencing; polymerase chain reaction; monoclonal antibodies; genetic engineering of plants and animals; and the human genome project. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BIOL 4424.)

  • BCMB 4444 VIROLOGY

    BCMB 4444 Virology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BCMB 4044

    This course is an introduction to the principles of animal virology. The classification and replicative cycles of viruses are compared to their pathogenic mechanisms. Viral oncogenes and modern anti-viral chemotherapy and immunization are discussed. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BIOL 4444.)

  • BCMB 4448 MOLECULAR GENETICS

    BCMB 4448 Molecular Genetics
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444; Corequisite: BIOL 4048
    This course investigates the molecular mechanisms of genetics in greater detail than BIOL 3444 Genetics. Topics include the dynamic molecular structure of DNA, chromatin, RNA, and the proteins that interact with them. Special attention will be given to understanding current techniques used in the analysis of genomes. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BIOL 4448.)

  • BCMB 4448 MOLECULAR GENETICS

    BCMB 4448 Molecular Genetics
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444; Corequisite: BIOL 4048
    This course investigates the molecular mechanisms of genetics in greater detail than BIOL 3444 Genetics. Topics include the dynamic molecular structure of DNA, chromatin, RNA, and the proteins that interact with them. Special attention will be given to understanding current techniques used in the analysis of genomes. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BIOL 4448.)

  • BCMB 4464 IMMUNOLOGY

    BCMB 4464 Immunology
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BCMB 4064

    This course is an introductory study of the biological and clinical approaches to immunology. Discussions center on the mechanisms responsible for various clinical syndromes as well as basic immunological phenomena such as antibody diversity, T cell receptor diversity, antigen presentation, signaling across cellular receptors, and cell activation. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BIOL 4464.)

  • BCMB 4481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BCMB 4481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 1004 INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY LAB

    BIOL 1004 Introductory Biology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 1404

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 1404.

  • BIOL 1014 INTRO MICROBIOL LAB

    BIOL 1014 Introductory Microbiology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 1414

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 1414.

  • BIOL 1404 INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY

    BIOL 1404 Introductory Biology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 1004

    This course is a general survey of biology including the study of plants, animals, ecology, and some marine biology. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course cannot be applied toward a biology major.

  • BIOL 1414 INTRODUCTORY MICROBIOLOGY

    BIOL 1414 Introductory Microbiology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 1014

    A general introduction of microbiology with emphasis placed on public health. Various disease-causing agents are discussed. Procedures used in disinfection and sterilization are demonstrated with consideration given to infection control. Includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course cannot be counted for credit toward a biology major.

  • BIOL 2004 HUM ANAT/PHYS I LAB

    BIOL 2004 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 2404

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 2404.

  • BIOL 2014 HUM ANAT/ PHYS II LAB

    BIOL 2014 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2004 and BIOL 2404
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 2414

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 2414.

  • BIOL 2054 GENERAL BIOLOGY I LAB

    BIOL 2054 General Biology I Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): SAT Composite 1110 or ACT Composite 22 or 12 credit hours of college course work
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 2454

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 2454.

  • BIOL 2055 GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB

    BIOL 2055 General Biology II Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2054 and BIOL 2454
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 2455

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 2455.

  • BIOL 2181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 2181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 2214 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

    BIOL 2214 Medical Terminology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides a comprehensive study of medical terminology including word roots, combining forms, prefixes and suffixes. Students build and analyze thousands of medical terms, and in the process, study the structure and functions of human body systems and diseases. This course cannot be counted for credit toward the biology major.

  • BIOL 2281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 2281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 2381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 2381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 2404 HUMAN ANAT/PHYS I

    BIOL 2404 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 2004

    The course deals with the anatomical description and functions of the systems of the human body. Emphasis is placed upon the interrelationship between structure and function with maintenance and homeostasis being the unifying principle. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 2414 HUMAN ANAT/ PHYS II

    BIOL 2414 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2404 and BIOL 2004
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 2014

    The course deals with the anatomical description and functions of the systems of the human body. Emphasis is placed upon the interrelationship between structure and function with maintenance and homeostasis being the unifying principle. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 2454 GENERAL BIOLOGY I

    BIOL 2454 General Biology I
    Prerequisite(s): SAT composite 1130 or ACT composite 22 or 12 hrs college coursework
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 2054

    Restriction(s): Biochemistry-Molecular Biology, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics majors only
    This course is required of all biology majors. Topics include cell structure and function, biological diversity, plant biology, and ecology. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 2455 GENERAL BIOLOGY II

    BIOL 2455 General Biology II
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 2055

    This course is required of all biology majors. Topics include animal tissues and organ systems, animal structure and function, life processes, biological diversity and the theory of evolution. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 2481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 2481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 3004 ENVIRONMENTAL SCI LAB

    BIOL 3004 Environmental Science Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3404

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 3404.

  • BIOL 3014 MICROBIOLOGY LAB

    BIOL 3014 Microbiology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3414

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 3414.

  • BIOL 3033 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY LAB

    BIOL 3033 Pathophysiology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): (BIOL 2404 and BIOL 2414) or (BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301)
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3433

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 3433.

  • BIOL 3034 ECOLOGY AND FIELD BIOLOGY LAB

    BIOL 3034 Ecology and Field Biology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): (BIOL 2404 and BIOL 2414) or (BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301)
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3434

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 3434.

  • BIOL 3044 GENETICS LAB

    BIOL 3044 Genetics Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): (BIOL 2404 and BIOL 2414) or (BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301)
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3444

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 3444.

  • BIOL 3054 GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY LAB

    BIOL 3054 General Physiology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3454

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 3454.

  • BIOL 3056 ADV HUMAN ANATOMY LAB

    BIOL 3056 Advanced Human Anatomy Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3456

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 3456.

  • BIOL 3064 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE

    BIOL 3064 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3464

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 3464.

  • BIOL 3181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 3181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 3281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 3281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 3301 CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

    BIOL 3301 Cellular and Molecular Biology
    Prerequiste(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and CHEM 2415
    This course is required of all biology majors. Topics include biological chemistry, cellular structure and function, energy transformations, DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis.

  • BIOL 3325 GLOBAL HEALTH

    BIOL 3325 Global Health
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, and BIOL 3301
    This course provides an overview to the field of Global Health. Students in this course will learn about pathogen-related diseases that are common in developed countries, as well as those more prominent in developing countries. Students will also learn about challenges facing healthcare around the world such as healthcare systems, healthcare education, emerging diseases, formulation and execution of major global initiates, healthcare inequality, sanitation, mental health, and age-related health issues.

  • BIOL 3325 GLOBAL HEALTH

    BIOL 3325 Global Health
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, and BIOL 3301
    This course provides an overview to the field of Global Health. Students in this course will learn about pathogen-related diseases that are common in developed countries, as well as those more prominent in developing countries. Students will also learn about challenges facing healthcare around the world such as healthcare systems, healthcare education, emerging diseases, formulation and execution of major global initiates, healthcare inequality, sanitation, mental health, and age-related health issues.

  • BIOL 3335 NUTRITION AND METABOLISM

    BIOL 3335 Nutrition and Metabolism
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Nutrition and Metabolism is designed to acquaint the student with the role of nutrients in health, the physiology of the gastrointestinal tract, and the importance of nutrition in preventive and curative medicine.

  • BIOL 3375 HUMAN GENETICS

    BIOL 3375 Human Genetics
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of human genetics and its molecular and clinical implications. Topics include the chromosomal, molecular, and biochemical basis of disease, prenatal diagnosis, and genetic counseling. (Offered also as BCMB 3375.)

  • BIOL 3381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 3381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 3404 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

    BIOL 3404 Environmental Science
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3004

    This course is a study of the interrelationships of the natural world and the interactions or organisms with their environment. Analysis of populations, both natural and human, in their communities and the impact of the physical factors will be explored. Current environmental issues will also be discussed. Sampling techniques and field studies will be emphasized. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course cannot be counted for credit toward the biology major.

  • BIOL 3414 MICROBIOLOGY

    BIOL 3414 Microbiology
    Prerequisite(s):BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3014

    This course is a general survey of the microorganisms and includes the morphology, physiology, and control of the organisms most important to humans. The microbiology of soil, food, water, and disease will be considered. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BCMB 3414.)

  • BIOL 3433 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    BIOL 3433 Pathophysiology
    Prerequisite(s): (BIOL 2404 and BIOL 2414) or (BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301)
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3033

    A general study of structure and function of human cells including the basic cellular requirements for life. The importance of fluid distribution, fluid volume and fluid balance along with abnormal deviations will be covered. The student will obtain an understanding of the pathology of the cardiovascular system, nervous system, endocrine system, digestive system, excretory system, and musculo-skeletal system. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 3434 ECOLOGY AND FIELD BIOLOGY

    BIOL 3434 Ecology and Field Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3034

    This course studies ecological concepts concerning ecosystems from a population, interspecific and community perspective. Sampling techniques and field studies will be emphasized. Analysis of populations in their communities will be explored. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 3444 GENETICS

    BIOL 3444 Genetics
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3044

    This course deals with the molecular and chromosomal basis of inheritance. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, population genetics, and molecular genetics. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 3454 GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY

    BIOL 3454 General Physiology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3054

    This course deals with the function of selected organ systems in vertebrates with the major emphasis on humans. Mechanisms of kidney function, circulation, respiration, nerve transmission, muscular contraction, endocrine function, and digestion are discussed in detail. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 3456 ADVANCED HUMAN ANATOMY

    BIOL 3456 Advanced Human Anatomy
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3056

    This is an advanced study of the anatomical structure of the human body. Body structure will be studied by organ systems and will involve a balance between gross anatomical study and histology. Form-function relationships will be emphasized. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 3464 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY

    BIOL 3464 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 3064

    A comparative study of the anatomy of representative vertebrates which stresses the patterns and interrelationship among vertebrates. A foundation is also provided for understanding the functions of vertebrate organs and systems. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 3481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 3481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 4023 HISTOLOGY LAB

    BIOL 4023 Histology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4423

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 4423.

  • BIOL 4024 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LAB

    BIOL 4024 Molecular Biology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4424

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 4424.

  • BIOL 4025 DRUG ACTION LAB

    BIOL 4025 Drug Action Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4425

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 4425.

  • BIOL 4033 EMBRYOLOGY LAB

    BIOL 4033 Embryology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4433

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 4433.

  • BIOL 4043 NEUROSCIENCE LAB

    BIOL 4043 Neuroscience Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4443

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 4443.

  • BIOL 4044 VIROLOGY LAB

    BIOL 4044 Virology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4444

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 4444.

  • BIOL 4048 MOLECULAR GENETICS LABORATORY

    BIOL 4048 Molecular Genetics Laboratory
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444; Corequisite: BIOL 4448
    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 4448.

  • BIOL 4048 MOLECULAR GENETICS LABORATORY

    BIOL 4048 Molecular Genetics Laboratory
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444; Corequisite: BIOL 4448
    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 4448.

  • BIOL 4064 IMMUNOLOGY LAB

    BIOL 4064 Immunology Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4464

    This is the laboratory portion of BIOL 4464.

  • BIOL 4081 SPECIAL TOPICS: LABORATORY

    BIOL 4081 Special Topics: Laboratory

  • BIOL 4081 SPECIAL TOPICS: LABORATORY

    BIOL 4081 Special Topics: Laboratory

  • BIOL 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 4272 INTEGRATING BIOL CONCEPTS

    BIOL 4272 Integrating the Concepts in Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3414 and BIOL 3444
    This course will integrate the knowledge, theories, and skills expected of a biologist. Topics will encompass and reinforce the material found in the courses of the Biology Core.

  • BIOL 4281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 4281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 4297 RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY

    BIOL 4297 Research in Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3414 and BIOL 3444
    Laboratory research is offered for a student majoring in Biology. At the conclusion of the research, a written paper will be presented to the student’s seminar advisor and an oral presentation of the results will be presented.

  • BIOL 4324 ADVANCED CELL BIOLOGY

    BIOL 4324 Advanced Cell Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    This course provides an in-depth study of selected dynamic processes that occur in living cells. Topics include DNA regulation and expression of genes; DNA repair; protein synthesis and function; protein sorting; vesicular traffic; cell signaling; and control of cell division. (Offered also as BCMB 4324.)

  • BIOL 4325 ENDOCRINOLOGY

    BIOL 4325 Endocrinology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    This course provides students with a working knowledge of endocrinology. Topics include the historical development of endocrinology; structure and function of the major hormone groups; models for cell signaling; how hormones influence metabolism; and diseases caused by abnormalities of the endocrine system.

  • BIOL 4335 RNA BIOLOGY

    BIOL 4335 RNA Biology
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    This course investigates the diverse structures and roles of RNA molecules in living cells. Both historical and current research on RNA and its varied functions will be covered. Topics include RNA with enzymatic function, cellular production and processing of RNA, regulatory RNA molecules, RNA splicing and splice defects, long non-coding RNA (IncRNA) and RNA localization within cells. (Offered also as BCMB 4335.)

  • BIOL 4335 RNA BIOLOGY

    BIOL 4335 RNA Biology
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    This course investigates the diverse structures and roles of RNA molecules in living cells. Both historical and current research on RNA and its varied functions will be covered. Topics include RNA with enzymatic function, cellular production and processing of RNA, regulatory RNA molecules, RNA splicing and splice defects, long non-coding RNA (IncRNA) and RNA localization within cells. (Offered also as BCMB 4335.)

  • BIOL 4363 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY

    BIOL 4363 Medical Microbiology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3414
    A study of microbial organisms that cause disease in humans. The characteristics of each pathogen are discussed along with its pathogenesis and pathology. (Offered also as BCMB 4363.)

  • BIOL 4375 CANCER BIOLOGY

    BIOL 4375 Cancer Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    This course examines the development of cancer at the cellular and molecular levels. Topics covered include tumor suppressors, oncogenes, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, telomerase, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Cancer prevention, screen, diagnosis, and treatment will also be introduced.

  • BIOL 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BIOL 4423 HISTOLOGY

    BIOL 4423 Histology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4023

    A study of the fine structure of normal human tissue is the principle area of consideration in this course. Tissue techniques will be included in order to afford an appreciation of the types of preparations used in the laboratory. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 4424 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

    BIOL 4424 Molecular Biology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4024

    This course presents recent developments in biotechnology and genetic engineering. Topics included are recombinant DNA; DNA cloning; DNA sequencing; polymerase chain reaction; monoclonal antibodies; genetic engineering of plants and animals; and the human genome project. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BCMB 4424.)

  • BIOL 4425 DRUG ACTION

    BIOL 4425 Drug Action
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4025

    This course presents the basic concepts and principles of pharmacology as related to the anatomy and physiology of certain body systems. Specific topics include principles of drug receptors; pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics; the actions of cholinoceptor-activating, cholinesterase-blocking, and cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs; adrenoceptor-activating and adrenoceptor-blocking drugs; and antihypertensive, antidepressant, and chemotherapeutic drugs. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 4433 EMBRYOLOGY

    BIOL 4433 Embryology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4033

    This is a study of the normally developing human from conception through birth. Common congenital defects are briefly discussed. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 4443 NEUROSCIENCE

    BIOL 4443 Neuroscience
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4043

    This course surveys the organization and functioning of the human nervous system. Action potentials and synaptic transmissions are emphasized. Sensory systems and movement are also considered along with new models that illustrate the function of memory systems. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • BIOL 4444 VIROLOGY

    BIOL 4444 Virology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4044

    This course is an introduction to the principles of animal virology. The classification and replicative cycles of viruses are compared to their pathogenic mechanisms. Viral oncogenes and modern anti-viral chemotherapy and immunization are discussed. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory. (Offered also as BCMB 4444.)

  • BIOL 4448 MOLECULAR GENETICS

    BIOL 4448 Molecular Genetics
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444; Corequisite: BIOL 4048
    This course investigates the molecular mechanisms of genetics in greater detail than BIOL 3444 Genetics. Topics include the dynamic molecular structure of DNA, chromatin, RNA, and the proteins that interact with them. Special attention will be given to understanding current techniques used in the analysis of genomes. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BCMB 4448.)

  • BIOL 4448 MOLECULAR GENETICS

    BIOL 4448 Molecular Genetics
    Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455, BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444; Corequisite: BIOL 4048
    This course investigates the molecular mechanisms of genetics in greater detail than BIOL 3444 Genetics. Topics include the dynamic molecular structure of DNA, chromatin, RNA, and the proteins that interact with them. Special attention will be given to understanding current techniques used in the analysis of genomes. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Offered also as BCMB 4448.)

  • BIOL 4464 IMMUNOLOGY

    BIOL 4464 Immunology
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3444
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 4064

    This course is an introductory study of the biological and clinical approaches to immunology. Discussions center on the mechanisms responsible for various clinical syndromes as well as basic immunological phenomena such as antibody diversity, T cell receptor diversity, antigen presentation, signaling across cellular receptors, and cell activation. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory. (Offered also as BCMB 4464.)

  • BIOL 4481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    BIOL 4481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s):BIOL 2454 and BIOL 2455 and BIOL 3301
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • BUSA 1305 THE WORLD OF BUSINESS

    BUSA 1305 The World of Business
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A foundations course that emphasizes decision making in an ever-changing world economy. The focus is on building a foundation for key success factors and life skills, including professionalism, communications, global and cultural awareness, team-based decision making, critical thinking, technological competence, and business language. Some emphasis is placed on career guidance, including an appreciation for the functional areas of business. BUSA 1305 is required by all BBA majors and BA-Managerial Studies majors. The course is to be taken by Business majors in their first semester, or within the first 12 hours of matriculating into the Archie W. Dunham College of Business. The course may be taken by non-Business majors who have earned less than 90 credit hours.

  • BUSA 2301 BUSINESS MATH

    BUSA 2301 Business Math
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1313 or higher
    This course covers selected topics of one- and multi-variable calculus with applications in business and economics. It will provide business students with the appropriate conceptual and computational mathematical background for future business study and economic analysis.

  • BUSA 2315 BUSINESS STATISTICS

    BUSA 2315 Business Statistics
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1313 or higher
    This course covers descriptive and inferential statistics and their application to business data. Topics include data visualization, measures of central tendency and dispersion, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, regression analysis and forecasting.

  • BUSA 2315 BUSINESS STATISTICS

    BUSA 2315 Business Statistics
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1313 or higher
    This course covers descriptive and inferential statistics and their application to business data. Topics include data visualization, measures of central tendency and dispersion, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, regression analysis and forecasting.

  • BUSA 2320 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS

    BUSA 2320 Legal Environment of Business
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the legal environment of business, the role of law in society, the judicial process, and government regulation. Emphases are given to the law of contracts, torts, intellectual property, as well as employment law dealing with discrimination and its relation to human resources.

  • BUSA 3315 SPREADSHEET MODEL BUS APP

    BUSA 3315 Spreadsheet Modeling with Business applications
    Prerequisites: BUSA 2301 and (BUSA 2315 or concurrent enrollment)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the environment of spreadsheets and its utilization for storage, presentation, visualization, and analysis of business data. Topics include, but are not limited to, pivot tables, spreadsheet modeling of business problems, optimization, risk management, and project management. All new concepts will be introduced using real business problems related to accounting, finance, economics, management, and marketing. The course will utilize Microsoft Excel-the most commonly used spreadsheet application.

  • BUSA 3315 SPREADSHEET MODEL BUS APP

    BUSA 3315 Spreadsheet Modeling with Business applications
    Prerequisites: BUSA 2301 and (BUSA 2315 or concurrent enrollment)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the environment of spreadsheets and its utilization for storage, presentation, visualization, and analysis of business data. Topics include, but are not limited to, pivot tables, spreadsheet modeling of business problems, optimization, risk management, and project management. All new concepts will be introduced using real business problems related to accounting, finance, economics, management, and marketing. The course will utilize Microsoft Excel-the most commonly used spreadsheet application.

  • BUSA 3320 BUSINESS ETHICS

    BUSA 3320 Business Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The goal of the Business Ethics class is to prepare students for success in global business. This will be achieved by helping students develop and apply a framework for identifying the ethical implications (personal, corporate, and social) of the various business practices they will encounter in an international market. A balance will be given to universal issues raised when adopting an ethical system and the particular issues involved in applying the ethical system to business issues. Main topics include: philosophical and cultural foundations of Business Ethics, applying ethical principles in the market place, and how to set up and carry out an effective Business Ethics program in an organization. The particular human resources issues of diversity, whistle blowing, recruiting and hiring, and compensation will be discussed as part of the application of ethical principles.

  • BUSA 4301 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

    BUSA 4301 International Business
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course combines classroom work with international travel and provides the student with direct contact with managers operating in other countries. An international trip is scheduled at the end of the course. Class time will cover basic principles of global business and cross-cultural interaction. It will particularly emphasize cultural and historical differences in the countries the students will visit and how those differences produce different managerial styles and contrasting business practices. In addition, students will do through research, preparation, and presentations on the specific companies they are scheduled to visit. There are no prerequisites for this course. However, students whose advisors wish to allow this course to substitute for one of the required senior seminars must meet the prerequisites for the senior seminars – 80 or more total hours including a minimum of 15 hours in business – in order to receive credit. This class may not be taken in the semester a student intends to graduate.

  • BUSA 4320 BUSINESS LAW

    BUSA 4320 Business Law
    Prerequisite(s): BUSA 2320
    Study of the uniform commercial code applied to commercial documents. Introduction to creditors’ rights and bankruptcy, agency and employment, business organizations, and property law.

  • BUSA 4340 INTERNSHIP

    BUSA 4340 Internship
    Prerequisite(s): See the Archie W. Dunham College of Business Internship Coordinator for current prerequisite information
    The course is an integrating field experience by which students learn actual business practices by undertaking responsible roles in an organization. The students develop interpersonal skills while acquiring practical knowledge in their disciplines. The students are exposed to various work roles and career choices.

  • BUSA 4399 GLOBAL BUSINESS STRATEGY

    BUSA 4399 Global Business Strategy
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 3320 and MGMT 3302 and MKTG 3301 and completion of 90 credit hours
    Global Business Strategy is a capstone course in business designed to integrate concepts and knowledge from a broad range of core business courses. The course considers the increasingly global context in which firms operate and develops a strategic view of the firm through a variety of management tools, models, and current debates. The capstone experience encourages significant group-based work through use of case studies and a computer simulation with global participants.

  • CHEM 1004 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY LAB

    CHEM 1004 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 1404

    This is the laboratory portion of CHEM 1404.

  • CHEM 1011 CHEMISTRY OF OUR WORLD LAB

    CHEM 1011 Chemistry of our World Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 1411

    This is the laboratory portion of CHEM 1411.

  • CHEM 1404 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY

    CHEM 1404 Introductory Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 1004

    This course discusses some of the fundamental concepts in inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry, and explores their social and medicinal relevance. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course cannot be applied toward a chemistry major.

  • CHEM 1411 CHEMISTRY OF OUR WORLD

    CHEM 1411 Chemistry of Our World
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 1011

    This course introduces the physical environment of our world with emphasis on scientific laws. Students study the forces of nature and apply scientific principles. Topics include rocks, minerals, the chemical composition of the earth, glaciers, the hydrologic cycle, salt water salinity, as well as selected topics from seismology, cartograpy, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. The course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course does not count toward the chemistry major or minor.

  • CHEM 2015 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LAB

    CHEM 2015 General Chemistry I Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): (MATH 1313 or higher) or (580 SAT Math) or (26 ACT Math) or (CHEM 1404) or (appropriate math placement score for MATH 1323 or MATH 1434 or MATH 1451)
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 2415

    This is the laboratory portion of CHEM 2415.

  • CHEM 2016 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LAB

    CHEM 2016 General Chemistry II Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2415
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 2416

    This is the laboratory portion of CHEM 2416.

  • CHEM 2023 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS LAB

    CHEM 2023 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2416
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 2423

    This is the laboratory portion of CHEM 2423.

  • CHEM 2181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 2181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 2281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 2281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 2381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 2381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 2415 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

    CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I
    Prerequisite(s): (MATH 1313 or higher) or (580 SAT Math) or (26 ACT Math) or (CHEM 1404) or (appropriate math placement score for MATH 1323, 1434, or 1451)
    Corequisite: CHEM 2015

    This course is for science majors. It is an introduction to chemical reactions, the mole concept, properties and states of matter, atomic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding and molecular structure. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • CHEM 2416 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

    CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2415
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 2016

    This is a continuation of CHEM 2415 with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and kinetics. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions that are devoted to qualitative analysis.

  • CHEM 2423 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    CHEM 2423 Quantitative Analysis
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2416
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 2023

    This course is a continuation and extension of CHEM 2415 and 2416 into the study of the basic principles of analytical chemistry, which include stoichiometry, and homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory work that includes both volumetric and gravimetric analysis as well as an introduction to instrumental analysis.

  • CHEM 2481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 2481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 3043 MODERN ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES

    CHEM 3043 Modern Analytical Techniques Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2423 and (CHEM 3132 or CHEM 4262) and PHYS 2423
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 3443

    This is the laboratory portion of CHEM 3443.

  • CHEM 3131 ORGANIC CHEM LAB I

    CHEM 3131 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3313 or concurrent enrollment.
    This course provides instruction in rudimentary organic laboratory techniques, simple organic syntheses, and basic identification of organic compounds by spectroscopy.

  • CHEM 3132 ORGANIC CHEM LAB II

    CHEM 3132 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3131 and (CHEM 3333 or concurrent enrollment).
    This course extends the instruction in organic laboratory techniques, organic synthesis, and the identification of organic compounds by spectroscopy begun in CHEM 3131.

  • CHEM 3151 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

    CHEM 3151 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2415 and CHEM 2416
    Students conduct experiments with the main group elements, the transition metals, organometallic materials, and bioinorganic compounds.

  • CHEM 3181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 3181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 3281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 3281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 3313 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

    CHEM 3313 Organic Chemistry I
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2416
    This is the first lecture course in organic chemistry for science majors. It begins a survey of the structure, reactivity, reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis of compounds containing carbon.

  • CHEM 3333 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

    CHEM 3333 Organic Chemistry II
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3313
    This is the second lecture course in organic chemistry for science majors. It continues the survey of the structure, reactivity, reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis of compounds containing carbon that was begun in CHEM 3313.

  • CHEM 3351 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

    CHEM 3351 Inorganic Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2415 and CHEM 2416
    This course provides a survey of the chemistry of the main group elements, transition metals, and organometallic compounds in the context of periodic law.

  • CHEM 3381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 3381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 3443 MODERN ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES

    CHEM 3443 Modern Analytical Techniques
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2423 and (CHEM 3132 or CHEM 4262) and PHYS 2423
    This is an introduction to the basic concepts of applied analytical chemistry. It includes an introduction to instrumentation as applied to routine chemical analysis, including spectroscopy, chromatography and electrochemical methods. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • CHEM 3481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 3481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 4014 INTRO PHYS CHEM LAB

    CHEM 4014 Introductory Physical Chemistry Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2423 and PHYS 2413 and PHYS 2423 and MATH 1452
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 4414

    This is the laboratory portion of CHEM 4414.

  • CHEM 4171 BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY

    CHEM 4171 Biochemistry Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 4373
    This is an upper level laboratory course which exposes students to the principles and experimental techniques underlying common biochemistry methods such as buffer preparation, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, protein and nucleic acid purification, enzyme kinetics, protein and nucleic acid electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reactions which are widely used in research pertaining to the biochemical sciences.

  • CHEM 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 4190 THE PROFESSIONAL CHEMIST

    CHEM 4190 The Professional Chemist
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of thirty credit hours of chemistry courses.
    Discussion of topics from the current chemical literature and the ethical behavior expected of chemists.

  • CHEM 4191 SENIOR RESEARCH PROJECT

    CHEM 4191 Senior Research Project
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of thirty credit hours of chemistry courses.
    Students conduct a laboratory research project, write a research report, and give an oral presentation to the class.

  • CHEM 4281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 4281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 4324 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

    CHEM 4324 Physical Chemistry II
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 4414
    This course is a survey of the fundamental aspects of thermodynamics including the First and Second Laws as well as Gibbs and Helmholtz Energy and their applications. Acids and bases, basic quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, photochemistry reactions, and macromolecules are also discussed. A working knowledge of calculus is necessary.

  • CHEM 4351 ADV INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

    CHEM 4351 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3131 and CHEM 3132 and CHEM 3313 and CHEM 3333 and CHEM 3351
    This course is an introduction to the structure, bonding, and reactivity of organotransition metal compounds. The focus is on physical organometallic chemistry, with an emphasis on the mechanisms of organometallic transformations and methods for their elucidation. The fundamental reaction types of organotransition metal complexes will be covered including: oxidative addition/reductive elimination, migratory insertion, attack on coordinated ligands, and the reactivity of metallocycles, carbenes, and carbynes. Some applications of organotransition metal complexes in catalysis and in organic chemistry will be featured.

  • CHEM 4361 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

    CHEM 4361 Advanced Organic Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3131 and CHEM 3132 and CHEM 3313 and CHEM 3333
    Study of advanced topics in organic chemistry.

  • CHEM 4373 BIOCHEMISTRY

    CHEM 4373 Biochemistry
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3333
    This course is a study of the more important principles of biochemistry, with emphasis placed on the physical and chemical properties of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins, the three major components of the living organism.

  • CHEM 4374 BIOCHEMISTRY II

    CHEM 4374 Biochemistry II
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 4373
    This course is a study of the principles of gene expression, replication, and metabolic pathways. Emphasis is placed on replication, transcription, translation and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional topics will include the citric acid cycle, lipid metabolism, electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation.

  • CHEM 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHEM 4414 INTRO PHYS CHEM

    CHEM 4414 Introductory Physical Chemistry
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2423 and PHYS 2413 and PHYS 2423 and MATH 1452
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 4014

    A survey of the fundamental principles which govern chemical phenomena. Emphasis is placed on gases, basic thermodynamics, solutions, chemical equilibria, phase equilibria, chemical kinetics and electrochemical phenomena. A working knowledge of basic calculus is necessary. This course includes one credit hour for laboratory sessions.

  • CHEM 4481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHEM 4481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • CHNG 5301 COACHING-METHODS & PROCEDURES

    CHNG 5301 Coaching-Methods and Procedures
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Life Coaching is a rapidly growing field that is a natural complement to the Counseling profession. It involves mentoring or guiding an individual as they explore the requisite skills, knowledge, confidence, and goals that they will need to become proficient and successful in the area(s) in which they are being coached. This course serves as an introduction of professional coaching from a Christian perspective with special attention given to coaching theories, practice, skills, and various coaching specialties.

  • CHNG 5301 COACHING-METHODS & PROCEDURES

    CHNG 5301 Coaching-Methods and Procedures
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Life Coaching is a rapidly growing field that is a natural complement to the Counseling profession. It involves mentoring or guiding an individual as they explore the requisite skills, knowledge, confidence, and goals that they will need to become proficient and successful in the area(s) in which they are being coached. This course serves as an introduction of professional coaching from a Christian perspective with special attention given to coaching theories, practice, skills, and various coaching specialties.

  • CHNG 6301 RELATIONSHIP COACHING

    CHNG 6301 Relationship Coaching
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 5301
    Relationship/Marriage Coaching involves mentoring or guiding a couple as they explore the requisite skills, knowledge, confidence, and goals that they will need to become proficient and successful in the area(s) in which they are being coached. This course will address some of the more advanced skills with which the Relationship/Marriage Coach should become adept (e.g., communication skills, conflict resolution skills). Attention will be paid to boundaries of competence and when referral is appropriate.

  • CHNG 6301 RELATIONSHIP COACHING

    CHNG 6301 Relationship Coaching
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 5301
    Relationship/Marriage Coaching involves mentoring or guiding a couple as they explore the requisite skills, knowledge, confidence, and goals that they will need to become proficient and successful in the area(s) in which they are being coached. This course will address some of the more advanced skills with which the Relationship/Marriage Coach should become adept (e.g., communication skills, conflict resolution skills). Attention will be paid to boundaries of competence and when referral is appropriate.

  • CHNG 6302 EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP COACHING

    CHNG 6302 Executive Leadership Coaching
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 5301
    This course provides the framework to the structure and strategy surrounding Leadership. Special attention will be given to leadership strategies for navigating project management, cultural awareness, inter-generational issues, and balancing work and home life. Attention will be paid to boundaries of competence and when referral is appropriate.

  • CHNG 6302 EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP COACHING

    CHNG 6302 Executive Leadership Coaching
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 5301
    This course provides the framework to the structure and strategy surrounding Leadership. Special attention will be given to leadership strategies for navigating project management, cultural awareness, inter-generational issues, and balancing work and home life. Attention will be paid to boundaries of competence and when referral is appropriate.

  • CHNG 6303 ORGANIZATIONAL COACHING

    CHNG 6303 Organizational Coaching
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 5301
    Designed to review current organizational theory as it relates to coaching and, in particular, the role of the coach in organizations and during organizational change, and coaching as the due diligence of change in organizations. Attention will be paid to boundaries of competence and when referral is appropriate.

  • CHNG 6303 ORGANIZATIONAL COACHING

    CHNG 6303 Organizational Coaching
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 5301
    Designed to review current organizational theory as it relates to coaching and, in particular, the role of the coach in organizations and during organizational change, and coaching as the due diligence of change in organizations. Attention will be paid to boundaries of competence and when referral is appropriate.

  • CHNG 6304 SPIRITUAL FORMATION COACHING

    CHNG 6304 Spiritual Formation Coaching
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 5301
    This course has a dual purpose: (1) to teach strategies for coaching others in developing and maintaining rich, satisfying, healthy spiritual lives; and (2) to engage students in spiritual formation and the development of spiritual discipline while encouraging them to evaluate their current spiritual functioning and how it can be deepened. Attention will be paid to boundaries of competence and when referral is appropriate.

  • CHNG 6304 SPIRITUAL FORMATION COACHING

    CHNG 6304 Spiritual Formation Coaching
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 5301
    This course has a dual purpose: (1) to teach strategies for coaching others in developing and maintaining rich, satisfying, healthy spiritual lives; and (2) to engage students in spiritual formation and the development of spiritual discipline while encouraging them to evaluate their current spiritual functioning and how it can be deepened. Attention will be paid to boundaries of competence and when referral is appropriate.

  • CHNG 6305 LIFE COACHING FOUNDATIONS I

    CHNG 6305 Life Coaching Foundations I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This is an introductory course into the field of professional life coaching that examines the fundamental principles of coaching, the role of faith and spirituality, models of theory and coaching practice, core skill development, goal setting, motivation, and change strategies. Attention will also be given to establishing a successful coaching business.

  • CHNG 6305 LIFE COACHING FOUNDATIONS I

    CHNG 6305 Life Coaching Foundations I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This is an introductory course into the field of professional life coaching that examines the fundamental principles of coaching, the role of faith and spirituality, models of theory and coaching practice, core skill development, goal setting, motivation, and change strategies. Attention will also be given to establishing a successful coaching business.

  • CHNG 6306 LIFE COACHING FOUNDATIONS II

    CHNG 6306 Life Coaching Foundations II
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 6305
    This course builds on Life Coaching Foundations I and explores how to develop a life coaching niche. It addresses advanced skills and technique development, coaching clients for life focus, gender issues and differences, understanding positive psychology principles, and incorporating personalized strategic action plans.

  • CHNG 6306 LIFE COACHING FOUNDATIONS II

    CHNG 6306 Life Coaching Foundations II
    Prerequisite(s): CHNG 6305
    This course builds on Life Coaching Foundations I and explores how to develop a life coaching niche. It addresses advanced skills and technique development, coaching clients for life focus, gender issues and differences, understanding positive psychology principles, and incorporating personalized strategic action plans.

  • CHRI 1301 INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE

    CHRI 1301 Introduction to the Bible
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of the Bible designed to introduce the student to the Old and New Testaments, their main themes, and backgrounds.

  • CHRI 1301 INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE

    CHRI 1301 Introduction to the Bible
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of the Bible designed to introduce the student to the Old and New Testaments, their main themes, and backgrounds.

  • CHRI 1313 OLD TESTAMENT

    CHRI 1313 Old Testament
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course designed to introduce the student to the Old Testament and to provide an understanding of the history, institutions, and theological insights of the Hebrew people.

  • CHRI 1314 INTRO TO THE CHRISTIAN FAITH

    CHRI 1314 Introduction to the Christian Faith
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to the Christian faith, its Scriptures, theology, and ethics. The intent of this course is to allow the student to understand the basic story of Scripture, the foundational Christian beliefs, and how those beliefs apply to one’s life, not only as an individual and within the family, but also as a larger member of society and as a professional in the world of work and commerce. CHRI 1314 fulfills the Liberal Arts Core requirement of CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373 for transfer students with 45+ hours of credit. With the exception of transfer students with 45+ hours of credit, CHRI 1314 will not meet the prerequisite requirements of CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373 for CHRI courses at the 2000-4000 level.

  • CHRI 1323 NEW TESTAMENT

    CHRI 1323 New Testament
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course designed to introduce the student to the New Testament and to an appreciative understanding of the life and teachings of Jesus, the early Christian movement, and the doctrinal concepts and ethical ideals of Christianity.

  • CHRI 2303 BIBLICAL LANGUAGES FR MINISTRY

    CHRI 2303 Biblical Languages For Ministry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A one-semester introduction to Classical Hebrew and Koine Greek with an emphasis on equipping the student to use commentaries, lexica, Bible software, and other language resources. The course introduces students to the history, alphabet, grammatical terminology, and basic features of each Biblical language.

  • CHRI 2303 BIBLICAL LANGUAGES FR MINISTRY

    CHRI 2303 Biblical Languages For Ministry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A one-semester introduction to Classical Hebrew and Koine Greek with an emphasis on equipping the student to use commentaries, lexica, Bible software, and other language resources. The course introduces students to the history, alphabet, grammatical terminology, and basic features of each Biblical language.

  • CHRI 2373 CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY/TRADITION

    CHRI 2373 Christian Theology and Tradition
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course designed to introduce the student to Christian beliefs on the Old Testament and the New Testament. Beliefs of scholars who have had a significant impact on Christian thought will also be considered. This course is a required course in the Liberal Arts Core Curriculum.

  • CHRI 3301 OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY

    CHRI 3301 Old Testament Theology
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A course designed to investigate the theology of the Old Testament and to survey selected secondary literature on Old Testament themes.

  • CHRI 3302 NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY

    CHRI 3302 New Testament Theology
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A course designed to investigate the theology of the New Testament and to survey selected secondary literature on New Testament themes.

  • CHRI 3303 SPIRITUAL FORMATION

    CHRI 3303 Spiritual Formation
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the perspectives and practices by which Christians become formed in the image of Christ through participation in faith communities. The course will review historic approaches to spiritual formation and encourage personal and congregational disciplines that strengthen faithful living.

  • CHRI 3311 HERMENEUTICS

    CHRI 3311 Hermeneutics
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A course designed to introduce students to the basic issues, methods, and history of Biblical interpretation. The course will also explore the application of hermeneutical principles to a selected contemporary topic. (Offered also as PHIL 3311.)

  • CHRI 3314 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY

    CHRI 3314 History of Christianity
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A course designed to introduce Christianity in its historical development.

  • CHRI 3325 THE CHRISTIAN VOCATION

    CHRI 3325 The Christian Vocation
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    This course includes a study of the occupational field of church vocations with emphasis upon the church vocation worker’s personal and ministerial identity, ministerial ethics, Baptist denominational history and polity, and the development of basic skills common to ministry. It incorporates the use of professional ministers from a variety of specialization areas who serve as resource personnel and role models for the aspiring church vocation student.

  • CHRI 3333 JESUS AND HIS TEACHINGS

    CHRI 3333 Jesus and His Teachings
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    An intensive study of the life and teachings of Jesus.

  • CHRI 3336 CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP

    CHRI 3336 Christian Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    This course reviews theories and literature concerning leadership from a Christian perspective. Students will study the theological and ecclesiological objectives of Christian leadership, the spiritual preparation required of leaders and core practices for leading faithfully and effectively.

  • CHRI 3344 PAUL AND HIS LETTERS

    CHRI 3344 Paul and His Letters
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the apostle Paul and his contribution to the progress of early Christianity based upon the book of Acts and the epistles attributed to Paul.

  • CHRI 3345 THE GENERAL LETTERS

    CHRI 3345 The General Letters
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the non-Pauline letters of the New Testament (James, 1-2 Peter, 1-3 John, Jude), examining their rhetorical style, contextual meaning, and contribution to Christian theology.

  • CHRI 3346 PSALMS

    CHRI 3346 Psalms
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    This course is designed to study the book of Psalms. The study will address the origin, content, setting, literary forms, overall structure and theology of the book. Attention may also be given to the important role the book has played in Christian history, liturgy, and spirituality.

  • CHRI 3353 HOMILETICS

    CHRI 3353 Homiletics
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A basic course to introduce the student to the principles of preaching and other ministerial speaking. Attention is given to various types of sermons and their preparation and delivery.

  • CHRI 3363 EVANGELISM

    CHRI 3363 Evangelism
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A general study of the theology and methods of evangelism, including practical preparation and application for a life-style evangelism.

  • CHRI 3370 PALESTINIAN ARCHAEOLOGY

    CHRI 3370 Palestinian Archaeology
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A field-based experience in the archaeology of Palestine through readings, lectures, travel to excavated sites, and participation in the excavation of a selected site.

  • CHRI 3377 SUPERVISED MINISTRY PRACTICUM

    CHRI 3377 Supervised Ministry Practicum-Hospital
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A field-based course in which the Christian vocations student functions in a ministry role under the supervision of both an experienced hospital professional and a university professor. Permission of instructor is required.

  • CHRI 3381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 3381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CHRI 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CHRI 4281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 4281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CHRI 4293 SENIOR SEMINAR

    CHRI 4293 Senior Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): (Completion of 80 semester hours–15 of which must be in the major) and an overall GPA of 2.0 or higher
    Directed studies in selected areas of the student’s special interests, including opportunities for independent research.

  • CHRI 4335 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY

    CHRI 4335 Systematic Theology
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A course designed to study the historical, biblical, and systematic approaches to Christian theology.

  • CHRI 4343 OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS

    CHRI 4343 Old Testament Prophets
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the prophetic movement in Israel and the writings of the canonical prophets.

  • CHRI 4344 THE GOSPEL OF JOHN

    CHRI 4344 The Gospel of John
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of the Gospel of John.

  • CHRI 4345 CHRISTIAN ETHICS

    CHRI 4345 Christian Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    This course provides a comprehensive study of Christian ethics including biblical and theological foundations, historical developments, and contemporary issues of moral concern. The central role of faith communities in moral development and the importance of church engagement with culture will be emphasized.

  • CHRI 4346 THE EPISTLE TO THE HEBREWS

    CHRI 4346 Hebrews
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of the letter to the Hebrews.

  • CHRI 4347 AMOS AND HOSEA

    CHRI 4347 Amos and Hosea
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of Amos and Hosea, with a focus on the message to the original hearers and the message to modern readers.

  • CHRI 4348 ISAIAH

    CHRI 4348 Isaiah
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of Isaiah, with a focus on the message to the original hearers and the message to modern readers.

  • CHRI 4349 LUKE AND ACTS

    CHRI 4349 Luke and Acts
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of Luke’s two volume work: the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles.

  • CHRI 4350 THE CORINTHIAN LETTERS

    CHRI 4350 The Corinthian Letters
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the New Testament texts of 1 & 2 Corinthians and to guide them towards an appreciative understanding of the material and cultural context of ancient Roman Corinth; the patterns of social life and conflict among early Christians in Corinth; the ethical, social, and theological ideals of Paul; and the place of the Corinthian correspondence in the ongoing life and literature of early Christianity.

  • CHRI 4351 APOSTOLIC FATHERS

    CHRI 4351 Apostolic Fathers
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the corpus of early Christian texts commonly called the Apostolic Fathers; to guide them towards an appreciative understanding of the material, cultural, social, and theological context of the Roman world within which these texts were written; and to situate the Apostolic Fathers in the wider life and literature of early Christianity.

  • CHRI 4352 JEREMIAH

    CHRI 4352 Jeremiah
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the historical setting, literary and rhetorical features, and theological themes of the prophetic writings of Jeremiah.

  • CHRI 4353 WORLD RELIGIONS

    CHRI 4353 World Religions
    Prerequisites: CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323.
    An introduction to the thought and practices of the great religions of the world. Attention is given to the origin, development, and major teachings of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. (Offered also as PHIL 4353.)

  • CHRI 4353 WORLD RELIGIONS

    CHRI 4353 World Religions
    Prerequisites: CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323.
    An introduction to the thought and practices of the great religions of the world. Attention is given to the origin, development, and major teachings of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. (Offered also as PHIL 4353.)

  • CHRI 4354 EXODUS

    CHRI 4354 Exodus
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of the historical setting, literary and rhetorical features, and theological themes of the book of Exodus.

  • CHRI 4355 TRINITARIANISM

    CHRI 4355 Trinitarianism
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    This course addresses the importance of the Trinity for Christian theology. Aspects explored will be the revelation of God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, the development of this doctrine, and the relevance and influence this theology has on the life and worship of the church.

  • CHRI 4356 LUTHER, CALVIN & REFORMATION

    CHRI 4356 Luther, Calvin, and the Reformation
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    This course explores the theological, historical, and social impact of the Protestant Reformation in the life of the Church. A particular focus will be the writings and influence of key figures such as Martin Luther and John Calvin.

  • CHRI 4363 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

    CHRI 4363 Philosophy of Religion
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A critical examination of the nature and validity of religious experience and the place of religion in human life. Consideration is given to religious problems such as the existence and nature of God, the source of religious knowledge, the nature of man, the origin and nature of evil. (Offered also as PHIL 4363.)

  • CHRI 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CHRI 4382 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 4382 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CHRI 4383 BAPTIST HISTORY

    CHRI 4383 Baptist History
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    A study of Baptist history and polity with particular emphasis given to Baptist origins, developments, distinctive theological positions, leaders, and current trends. Special attention will be given to Baptist life in America and particularly the Southern Baptist Convention.

  • CHRI 4385 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 4385 Special Topics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course designed to explore topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit.

  • CHRI 4385 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 4385 Special Topics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course designed to explore topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit.

  • CHRI 4391 ROMANS

    CHRI 4391 Romans
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    CHRI 4391 is an upper-level Christianity course. This course fulfills requirements for one elective course required for a minor in Biblical Studies, Theological Studies, or Christian Studies.

  • CHRI 4392 REVELATION

    CHRI 4392 Revelation
    Prerequisite(s): (CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323) or (CHRI 1301 and CHRI 2373) or HNRS 1710 or (CHRI 1314 for students transferring in with 45 or more credit hours)
    CHRI 4392 is an upper-level Christianity course. This course fulfills requirements for one elective course for a major in Christianity or one elective course required for a minor in Biblical Studies, Theological Studies, or Christian Studies.

  • CHRI 5101 SPIRITUAL FORMATION I

    CHRI 5101 Spiritual Formation I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A practical course cultivating a holistic relationship with God, learning to love God with one’s heart, mind, soul, and strength, focusing especially on traditional spiritual disciplines such as solitude, silence, spiritual reading, contemplative prayer, etc.

  • CHRI 5102 SPIRITUAL FORMATION II

    CHRI 5102 Spiritual Formation II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A practical course cultivating a holistic relationship with God, learning to love God with one’s heart, mind, soul, and strength, focusing especially on traditional spiritual disciplines such as solitude, silence, spiritual reading, contemplative prayer, etc.

  • CHRI 5103 SPIRITUAL FORMATION III

    CHRI 5103 Spiritual Formation III
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A practical course cultivating a holistic relationship with God, learning to love God with one’s heart, mind, soul, and strength, focusing especially on traditional spiritual disciplines such as solitude, silence, spiritual reading, contemplative prayer, etc.

  • CHRI 5104 SPIRITUAL FORMATION IV

    CHRI 5104 Spiritual Formation IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A practical course cultivating a holistic relationship with God, learning to love God with one’s heart, mind, soul, and strength, focusing especially on traditional spiritual disciplines such as solitude, silence, spiritual reading, contemplative prayer, etc.

  • CHRI 5110 INTERNSHIP I

    CHRI 5110 Internship I
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor
    An internship in pastoral ministry with field experience in a church. HBU faculty will provide oversight and mentorship. Can be taken multiple times for credit.

  • CHRI 5181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 5181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None.
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CHRI 5210 INTERNSHIP II

    CHRI 5210 Internship II
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor
    An internship in pastoral ministry with field experience in a church. HBU faculty will provide oversight and mentorship. Can be taken multiple times for credit.

  • CHRI 5300 INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL TEXTS

    CHRI 5300 Introduction to Biblical Texts and Doctrines
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course designed to engage students in introductory studies in Old Testament, New Testament, and Christian Doctrine.

  • CHRI 5301 RESEARCH METHODS

    CHRI 5301 Research Methods
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A practical course to develop effective research and writing skills for graduate-level academic work. The course will cover topics such as developing an effective writing and revising process; using primary and secondary source materials; writing abstracts, book reviews, conference presentations, and research papers; and clarity and precision of language.

  • CHRI 5305 THEOLOGICAL INQUIRY

    CHRI 5305 Theological Inquiry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A class to prepare students for theological reading and writing at the graduate level The class will focus on Biblical exegesis.

  • CHRI 5310 CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES I

    CHRI 5310 Christian Scriptures I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Major issues of Old Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are the Pentateuch and Wisdom Literature. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

  • CHRI 5311 HERMENEUTICS

    CHRI 5311 Hermeneutics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course designed to introduce a student to the basic issues, methods, and history of biblical interpretation.

  • CHRI 5315 CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES II

    CHRI 5315 Christian Scriptures II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The focus of this course of study is on New Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are the Gospels and Acts. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

  • CHRI 5325 INTRODUCTION TO MISSIONS

    CHRI 5325 Introduction to Missions
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course of study is designed to introduce the student to the biblical, theological, historical and practical basis for Christian missions. Special attention will be given to current practices and contemporary issues related to global missions.

  • CHRI 5330 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY

    CHRI 5330 History of Christianity
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this course, the student will study the history of Christianity in the ancient, medieval, and modern periods. Although the primary focus will be on the development of Western (Latin) Christianity, some consideration will be given to Byzantine (Eastern) Christendom as well as the spread of Christianity throughout the third world. In addition to the basic content of the history of Christianity, attention will be given to the application of a critical historiography in the interpretation of events and movements.

  • CHRI 5340 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY

    CHRI 5340 Systematic Theology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course will focus on twelve areas of doctrinal study. The student will be assigned doctrines to examine from a biblical perspective and from a comparative study of various theologies on the doctrines assigned.

  • CHRI 5350 THEOLOGY: NEW TESTAMENT

    CHRI 5350 The Theology of the New Testament
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The study concentrates on the theological message of the New Testament as communicated by the various New Testament witnesses.

  • CHRI 5360 OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY

    CHRI 5360 Old Testament Theology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The study concentrates on the theological message of the Old Testament as communicated by the various Old Testament documents and literature in the discipline of Old Testament studies.

  • CHRI 5370 SECOND TEMPLE JUDAISM

    CHRI 5370 Second Temple Judaism
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course focuses on the history of Judaism from roughly 300 B.C. through 200 A.D., including discussion of changes in the political scene and the development of theological themes in Jewish literature of this period.

  • CHRI 5380 EARLY PATRISTIC PERIOD

    CHRI 5380 The Early Patristic Period
    Prerequisite(s): CHRI 5315
    This course focuses on the development of Christianity from the end of the apostolic era through the early patristic era. It explores the parting of the ways between Jews and Christians; the social, political, and religious situation of post-apostolic Christianity; and the development of church institutional structures, orthodox theology, and a canon of scripture.

  • CHRI 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CHRI 6311 PHILOSOPHY/CHRISTIAN FAITH

    CHRI 6311 Philosophy and the Christian Faith
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The study will introduce students to the general topic of the relationship of theology and philosophy as well as major philosophical inquiries in the area of religion. In particular, students will pursue concentrated investigation among major issues in the field of philosophy of religion such as the nature and existence of God, the nature of religious experience, the nature and understanding of religious language, the source of religious knowledge, the nature of evil, the relationship between Christianity and other reflective disciplines, and Christianity’s response to philosophical challenge and discourse.

  • CHRI 6312 CHURCH MINISTRY

    CHRI 6312 Church Ministry
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Students will study church ministry, pastoral care, and spiritual formation in this course. Church ministry will include areas such as evangelism, church growth, and administration. Pastoral care with practical aspects of the pastoral role in caring for people. Spiritual formation will relate the spiritual life to the tasks of ministry. Students also will conduct interviews with local and state church and denominational leaders for practical aspects of ministry, available resources, and programming helps.

  • CHRI 6313 PASTORAL CARE AND SPIRITUAL

    CHRI 6313 Pastoral Care and Spiritual Formation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the integration of the life of prayer and the caring tasks of ministry. Classic writings in the area of pastoral care will be used with particular reference to the functions of ministry and the role of the devotional life in the performance of various ministerial duties. The course may also focus on the relationship between the cura animarum of classic pastoral care and the therapeutic approaches of contemporary pastoral counseling.

  • CHRI 6314 MISSIONS AND EVANGELISM

    CHRI 6314 Missions and Evangelism
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course of study will include the history of missions and the history of great awakenings. Also included would be studies in the church growth movement. Practical applications of evangelistic missions or church growth activities will be part of the requirements for this course.

  • CHRI 6315 CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES III

    CHRI 6315 Christian Scriptures III
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course continues the study of Old Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are the major and minor prophets. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

  • CHRI 6320 CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES IV

    CHRI 6320 Christian Scriptures IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course continues the study of New Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are Paul¿s letters, general letters, and Revelation. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

  • CHRI 6325 CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURE V

    CHRI 6325 Christian Scripture V
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course continues the study of Old Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are the historical books of the Old Testament. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

  • CHRI 6328 CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURE VI

    CHRI 6328 Christian Scripture VI
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course continues the study of New Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are the general letters in the New Testament and Revelation. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

  • CHRI 6330 CHRISTIAN READINGS

    CHRI 6330 Christian Readings
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Involves selected primary and secondary readings within specific areas as designated by the professor and according to the student’s educational needs in their fields of study. Limited to one enrollment.

  • CHRI 6333 HISTORICAL/MORAL THEOLOGY

    CHRI 6333 Historical and Moral Theology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The subject of this course is the historical development of Christian theology and ethics from the second century to the present. Directed study will focus on the theological and moral ideas in the writings of significant figures of ancient, medieval, and modern Christianity. The student will be required to study each writer as a person of his or her own age by means of a critical analysis of the influences, context, and content of his or her own writings. Additionally, consideration will be given to the matter of how the theology and ethics of the Christian past offer insight into contemporary issues and problems.

  • CHRI 6340 CHRISTIAN READINGS

    CHRI 6340 Christian Readings
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Involves selected primary and secondary readings within specific areas as designated by the professor and according to the student’s educational needs in their fields of study. Limited to one enrollment.

  • CHRI 6350 CHRISTIAN READINGS

    CHRI 6350 Christian Readings
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Involves selected primary and secondary readings within specific areas as designated by the professor and according to the student’s educational needs in their fields of study. Limited to one enrollment.

  • CHRI 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CHRI 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CHRI 6392 THESIS

    CHRI 6392 Thesis
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The thesis component is in lieu of the last six hours in the Master of Arts in Theological Studies (MATS) program. The thesis proposed by the student must be selected under the guidance and approval of the department, and the rendering of the thesis must be in a minimum of 75 pages.

  • CHRI 6393 THESIS

    CHRI 6393 Thesis
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The thesis component is in lieu of the last six hours in the Master of Arts in Theological Studies (MATS) program. The thesis proposed by the student must be selected under the guidance and approval of the department, and the rendering of the thesis must be in a minimum of 75 pages.

  • CISM 1321 INTRO:COMPUTER APPL

    CISM 1321 Introduction to Computer Applications
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course emphasizes current concepts and techniques for utilizing the microcomputer as an information processor. A practical laboratory component affords hands-on experience with word processing, database management, and spreadsheet programs.

  • CISM 3330 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    CISM 3330 Management Information Systems
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2301
    Provides a basic understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation, management decision-making, and strategic advantage. Concentrates on providing the tools needed for mastery of the information systems concepts and terms important to non-technical business managers.

  • CISM 6367 GLOBAL BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY

    CISM 6367 Global Business and Technology Strategies
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT 5260
    Focuses on information technology management issues that must be addressed for a company to succeed in the intensely competitive global marketplace. Specific topics include models and paradigms of global information systems, national information technology infrastructure, technical and managerial information technology issues in different parts of the world, and technology transfer. Graduate Business programs only.

  • CLAS 1351 CLASSICAL GREEK I

    CLAS 1351 Classical Greek I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Elementary introduction to the fundamentals of Classical, principally Attic, Greek. Topics include alphabet, pronunciation, basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax, and practice in reading elementary Classical Greek. Graded reading material is adapted from classical texts and cultivates an appreciation of Classical literature and culture.

  • CLAS 1352 CLASSICAL GREEK II

    CLAS 1352 Classical Greek II
    Prerequisite(s): CLAS 1351
    Continuation of elementary Classical Greek sequence. Topics include continued study of vocabulary, grammar and syntax, reading more difficult Greek, and gaining greater appreciation of Classical literature and culture.

  • CLAS 2351 CLASSICAL GREEK III

    CLAS 2351 Classical Greek III
    Prerequisite(s): CLAS 1352
    An intermediate course in Classical Greek with three main goals: to develop proficiency in reading Classical Greek; to strengthen command of Classical Greek grammar and vocabulary; and, to explore key features of Greek life and culture. Students read extended selections in original Greek prose. Classroom discussion addresses cultural and historical issues while also reviewing grammar.

  • CLAS 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CLAS 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CLAS 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CLAS 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • CLAS 5310 CLASSICS AND CHRISTIANITY

    CLAS 5310 Classics and Christianity
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course surveys religious, philosophical, and other cultural themes of the ancient Greco-Roman world and their relation to the early Christian movement and its theology.

  • CLAS 5320 CLASSICAL PHILOSOPHY

    CLAS 5320 Classical Philosophy
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course offers a survey of ancient philosophy from the pre-Socratics of the sixth century BC through the demise of the major schools of the Hellenistic period and the rise of eclectic philosophy during the Roman period.

  • CLAS 5330 GRECO-ROMAN RELIGION

    CLAS 5330 Greco-Roman Religion
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course offers a survey of Greek and Roman religion, including mythology, cultic worship, and philosophy.

  • CLAS 5340 CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

    CLAS 5340 Classical Archaeology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course offers an introduction to the principles of classical archaeology and a survey of important Greek and Roman material remains.

  • CNMA 0301 INTRO TO VIDEO PRODUCTION

    CNMA 0301 Introduction to Video Production
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A comprehensive overview of the video production process, including an introduction to camera operation, lighting and sound equipment, general set protocols, post-production software, and workflow.

  • CNMA 1060 THE COLLEGIAN

    CNMA 1060 The Collegian
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this practicum course, students will participate in HBU’s student news organization, The Collegian. Based on the level of intended involvement, students may enroll in zero- to three-credit hours of participation.

  • CNMA 1150 FAITH CULTURE & THE ARTS

    CNMA 1150 Faith, Culture, & the Arts
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This class explores the role of Christian artists in culture. Students will study how great Christian thinkers have thought about culture and art throughout church history and be challenged to understand their vocation as artists and media creators from a biblical perspective. Students will also develop an understanding of how to live out their faith through their work as they seek to affect the culture around them. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • CNMA 1160 THE COLLEGIAN

    CNMA 1160 The Collegian
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this practicum course, students will participate in HBU’s student news organization, The Collegian. Based on the level of intended involvement, students may enroll in zero- to three-credit hours of participation.

  • CNMA 1250 FAITH CULTURE & THE ARTS

    CNMA 1250 Faith, Culture, & the Arts
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This class explores the role of Christian artists in culture. Students will study how great Christian thinkers have thought about culture and art throughout church history and be challenged to understand their vocation as artists and media creators from a biblical perspective. Students will also develop an understanding of how to live out their faith through their work as they seek to affect the culture around them. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • CNMA 1260 THE COLLEGIAN

    CNMA 1260 The Collegian
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this practicum course, students will participate in HBU’s student news organization, The Collegian. Based on the level of intended involvement, students may enroll in zero- to three-credit hours of participation.

  • CNMA 1301 CINEMATIC CORE PRINCIPLES

    CNMA 1301 Cinematic Core Principles
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 0301
    An overview and survey of the cinematic medium and its various forms, with an emphasis on historical foundations and developing opportunities. Includes an in-depth look at the fundamental components of the medium – writing, directing, acting, cinematography, and editing – and synthesizes these various roles so that students can see how these components work together to create the end product. Building off of smaller exercises, students will produce their own short films from start-to-finish.

  • CNMA 1305 ART OF STORYTELLING

    CNMA 1305 Art of Storytelling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An overview and survey of storytelling across multiple mediums, from ancient oral tradition to modern video games. This class will explore the role storytelling plays in culture and help train students in the development and presentation of stories.

  • CNMA 1310 MEDIA & CAREERS SURVEY

    CNMA 1310 Media & Careers Survey
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A broad overview of the history and scope of the modern media industry and the particular opportunities and challenges within this dynamic, multi-platform landscape. This class also helps students navigate the media industries by introducing the concepts of networking and pitching.

  • CNMA 1311 COLLABORATION & COMMUNICATION

    CNMA 1311 Collaboration & Communication
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Collaborative mediums require individuals to come together and work efficiently as a team. This course explores communication theory and uses collaborative projects to introduce students to the various challenges they may face and helps them find the best ways to overcome those challenges as a team.

  • CNMA 1350 FAITH CULTURE & THE ARTS

    CNMA 1350 Faith, Culture, & the Arts
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This class explores the role of Christian artists in culture. Students will study how great Christian thinkers have thought about culture and art throughout church history and be challenged to understand their vocation as artists and media creators from a biblical perspective. Students will also develop an understanding of how to live out their faith through their work as they seek to affect the culture around them. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • CNMA 1360 THE COLLEGIAN

    CNMA 1360 The Collegian
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this practicum course, students will participate in HBU’s student news organization, The Collegian. Based on the level of intended involvement, students may enroll in zero- to three-credit hours of participation.

  • CNMA 2301 WRITING FOR CINEMA/NEW MEDIA

    CNMA 2301 Writing for Cinema & New Media
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 1301 and CNMA 1305
    An introduction to the art, technique, and structure of screenplay writing. Through exercises, students will develop their writing abilities and craft their first film or new media script.

  • CNMA 2303 DIRECTING FOR CINEMA/NEW MEDIA

    CNMA 2303 Directing for Cinema & New Media
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 1301 and CNMA 1305 and CNMA 1311
    An introduction to the art and craft of directing, including an overview of different mediums, styles, and approaches. Throughout the class, students will direct short scenes and videos to practice and apply the techniques they are learning.

  • CNMA 2305 PRODUCING FOR CINEMA/NEW MEDIA

    CNMA 2305 Producing for Cinema & New Media
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 1301 and CNMA 1305 and CNMA 1310 and CNMA 1311
    An introduction to the work of a producer in cinema and new media. This class includes a detailed look at the pre-production steps that a producer oversees – including budgeting, scheduling, and crewing a production – as well as practical considerations, business realities, and elements of leadership.

  • CNMA 2310 CINEMATOGRAPHY & PRODUCTION

    CNMA 2310 Cinematography & Production
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 1301 and CNMA 1305 and CNMA 1310 and CNMA 1311
    An introduction to the film set and its key participants, including the cinematographer, gaffer, key grip, assistant director, script supervisor, and sound recordist. Students will explore different production techniques and learn how different scales of crew and budget affect on-set workflow.

  • CNMA 2312 EDITING & POST-PRODUCTION

    CNMA 2312 Editing & Post-Production
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 1301 and CNMA 1305 and CNMA 1310 and CNMA 1311
    An introduction to the post-production workflow with a focus on the art and craft of cinematic editing. The class also guides students through sound, visual effects, color grading, and finishing.

  • CNMA 2316 PROD DESIGN/ART DIRECTION

    CNMA 2316 Production Design & Art Direction
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An overview of production design for cinema, including conceptual design, sets, props, wardrobe, and lighting. Students will be challenged to develop a strong aesthetic for art direction and will explore the practical challenges associated with executing production design in cinema and new media.

  • CNMA 2318 PRINCIPLES OF ACTING

    CNMA 2318 Principles of Acting
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Students are taught the elements of acting and directing actors. Key theories and approaches are explored, including method acting and improvisation.

  • CNMA 3110 CINEMATOGRAPHY PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3110 Cinematography Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2310
    Cinematography students work with a mentor to prep and shoot a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3112 SOUND/VISUAL EFFECTS PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3112 Sound/Visual Effects Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2312
    Post-production students work with a mentor as they complete sound, visual effects, or other post-production work on a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3116 PRODUCTION DESIGN PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3116 Production Design Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2316
    Production design students work with a mentor as they conceptualize and execute the art direction on a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3118 ACTING PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3118 Acting Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2318
    Acting students work with a mentor as they execute a performance in a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3120 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CNMA 3120 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): Will vary depending on the specific topic
    Special topics and projects are determined based on student interest and need, faculty availability, and subject matter that would be supportive of the Cinema & New Media Arts curriculum.

  • CNMA 3125 CASTING PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3125 Casting Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2318
    Students work with an experienced casting director to cast a feature film production (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3145 INTERNSHIP

    CNMA 3145 Internship
    Prerequisite(s): Six hours of CNMA 2000 or CNMA 3000 level coursework
    Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

  • CNMA 3175 MEDIA STUDIES

    CNMA 3175 Media Studies
    Prerequisite(s): Will vary depending on the specific topic
    This course is programmed each semester to expose students to a broad range of cinematic styles and approaches. Classes focus on a variety of subjects (e.g., a European Film Survey, the complete works of Frank Capra, or a season of Emmy-award-winning television.)

  • CNMA 3210 CINEMATOGRAPHY PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3210 Cinematography Practicum
    Prerequisite: CNMA 2310
    Cinematography students work with a mentor to prep and shoot a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3212 SOUND/VISUAL EFFECTS PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3212 Sound/Visual Effects Practicum
    Prerequisite: CNMA 2312
    Post-production students work with a mentor as they complete sound, visual effects, or other post-production work on a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3216 PRODUCTION DESIGN PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3216 Production Design Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2316
    Production design students work with a mentor as they conceptualize and execute the art direction on a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3218 ACTING PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3218 Acting Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2318
    Acting students work with a mentor as they execute a performance in a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3220 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CNMA 3220 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): Will vary depending on the specific topic
    Special topics and projects are determined based on student interest and need, faculty availability, and subject matter that would be supportive of the Cinema & New Media Arts curriculum.

  • CNMA 3225 CASTING PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3225 Casting Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2318
    Students work with an experienced casting director to cast a feature film production (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3245 INTERNSHIP

    CNMA 3245 Internship
    Prerequisite: 6 hrs of CNMA 2000 or 3000 level coursework
    Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

  • CNMA 3275 MEDIA STUDIES

    CNMA 3275 Media Studies
    Prerequisite(s): Will vary depending on the specific topic
    This course is programmed each semester to expose students to a broad range of cinematic styles and approaches. Classes focus on a variety of subjects (e.g., a European Film Survey, the complete works of Frank Capra, or a season of Emmy-award-winning television.)

  • CNMA 3301 ADVANCED WRITING

    CNMA 3301 Advanced Writing
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2301
    Students apprentice with an experienced screenwriter who mentors them through the writing of a feature film screenplay (or equivalent). Students are also introduced to collaborative writing environments (as would be found in a television or new media production with multiple writers).

  • CNMA 3303 ADVANCED DIRECTING

    CNMA 3303 Advanced Directing
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2303
    Students apprentice with an experienced director who mentors them through the direction of a short film. Students will work with the director through each stage of development and planning for their film.

  • CNMA 3305 ADVANCED PRODUCING

    CNMA 3305 Advanced Producing
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2305
    Students apprentice with an experienced producer throughout pre-production of a large-scale production. Students will attend production meetings and work with the producer to assemble budgets and schedules, secure locations and permits, and prepare equipment and crews.

  • CNMA 3307 ADVANCED EDITING

    CNMA 3307 Advanced Editing
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2312
    Students apprentice with an experienced editor who works with them on the editing of a feature film production. Students have the opportunity to edit their own scenes, as well as to collaborate with the editor and director in editorial meetings.

  • CNMA 3309 DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING

    CNMA 3309 Documentary Filmmaking
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 1301 and CNMA 1305 and CNMA 1310 and CNMA 1311
    An overview of the art and craft of documentary filmmaking. Explores various styles, goals, and artistic opportunities. Includes a focus on the technical aspects of documentary production.

  • CNMA 3310 CINEMATOGRAPHY PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3310 Cinematography Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2310
    Cinematography students work with a mentor to prep and shoot a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3312 SOUND/VISUAL EFFECTS PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3312 Sound/Visual Effects Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2312
    Post-production students work with a mentor as they complete sound, visual effects, or other post-production work on a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3316 PRODUCTION DESIGN PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3316 Production Design Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2316
    Production design students work with a mentor as they conceptualize and execute the art direction on a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3318 ACTING PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3318 Acting Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2318
    Acting students work with a mentor as they execute a performance in a short film (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3320 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    CNMA 3320 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): Will vary depending on the specific topic
    Special topics and projects are determined based on student interest and need, faculty availability, and subject matter that would be supportive of the Cinema & New Media Arts curriculum.

  • CNMA 3325 CASTING PRACTICUM

    CNMA 3325 Casting Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 2318
    Students work with an experienced casting director to cast a feature film production (or equivalent production).

  • CNMA 3330 DIGITAL DESIGN & PORTFOLIO

    CNMA 3330 Digital Design & Portfolio
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Introduces key design principles for graphic design, web design, and app development. Students will complete multiple digital design projects, including a personal web portfolio.

  • CNMA 3330 DIGITAL DESIGN & PORTFOLIO

    CNMA 3330 Digital Design & Portfolio
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Introduces key design principles for graphic design, web design, and app development. Students will complete multiple digital design projects, including a personal web portfolio.

  • CNMA 3335 PRINCIPLES INTERACTIVE MEDIA

    CNMA 3335 Principles of Interactive Media
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 3330
    Through case studies and exercises, students are introduced to defining principles of interactive media, from basic game theory to user interface design. Students will develop interactive content building on these principles throughout the semester.

  • CNMA 3335 PRINCIPLES INTERACTIVE MEDIA

    CNMA 3335 Principles of Interactive Media
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 3330
    Through case studies and exercises, students are introduced to defining principles of interactive media, from basic game theory to user interface design. Students will develop interactive content building on these principles throughout the semester.

  • CNMA 3345 INTERNSHIP

    CNMA 3345 Internship
    Prerequisite(s): 6 hrs of CNMA 2000 or 3000 level coursework
    Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

  • CNMA 3375 MEDIA STUDIES

    CNMA 3375 Media Studies
    Prerequisite(s): Will vary depending on the specific topic
    This course is programmed each semester to expose students to a broad range of cinematic styles and approaches. Classes focus on a variety of subjects (e.g., a European Film Survey, the complete works of Frank Capra, or a season of Emmy-award-winning television.)

  • CNMA 4199 SENIOR PORTFOLIO

    CNMA 4199 Senior Portfolio
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 3330 and 24 hours of CNMA coursework
    Working with a faculty member, students complete a professional resume and portfolio featuring their best coursework and personal projects (in preparation for interviews, etc.)

  • CNMA 4199 SENIOR PORTFOLIO

    CNMA 4199 Senior Portfolio
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 3330 and 24 hours of CNMA coursework
    Working with a faculty member, students complete a professional resume and portfolio featuring their best coursework and personal projects (in preparation for interviews, etc.)

  • CNMA 4300 ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS

    CNMA 4300 Entertainment Business
    Prerequisite(s): Six credit hours of CNMA 2000 level coursework
    An overview of the business and legal elements that will affect students’ work, whether as independent filmmakers or in industry careers. This class also examines the changing dynamics in the digital economy and trains students in the art of pitching and presentation.

  • CNMA 4305 MEDIA LAW & ETHICS

    CNMA 4305 Media Law & Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 1301 and CNMA 1310 and CNMA 1311
    Examines legal concepts in relation to media, publishing, and writing as well as exploring ethical issues inherent to modern media, art, and mass communication.

  • CNMA 4330 ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN

    CNMA 4330 Advanced Digital Design
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 3330
    Develops and applies key design principles for graphic design, web design, and app development in larger project-based assignments. Course incorporates advanced concepts including coding, analytics, and APIs.

  • CNMA 4330 ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN

    CNMA 4330 Advanced Digital Design
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 3330
    Develops and applies key design principles for graphic design, web design, and app development in larger project-based assignments. Course incorporates advanced concepts including coding, analytics, and APIs.

  • CNMA 4350 ADVANCED FILM THEORY

    CNMA 4350 Advanced Film Theory
    Prerequisite(s): 9 credit hours of CNMA 2000 level coursework
    Building on the ideas explored in earlier classes, this is a rigorous study of cinematic theory, including in-depth examinations of Eisenstein’s theories of montage, French auteur theory, and Tarkovsky’s notion of sculpting in time.

  • CNMA 4390 SENIOR PROJECT I

    CNMA 4390 Senior Project I
    Prerequisite(s): 33 credit hours of CNMA coursework
    The capstone experience for each student is a year-long final project. Developed and completed with oversight from a faculty member, these classes offer students the time and space to create a professional-quality project that can be used to kick start their artistic career after graduation.

  • CNMA 4395 SENIOR PROJECT II

    CNMA 4395 Senior Project II
    Prerequisite(s): 33 credit hours of CNMA coursework
    The capstone experience for each student is a year-long final project. Developed and completed with oversight from a faculty member, these classes offer students the time and space to create a professional-quality project that can be used to kick start their artistic career after graduation.

  • CNMA 6185 INTERNSHIP

    CNMA 6185 Internship
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6323
    Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

  • CNMA 6185 INTERNSHIP

    CNMA 6185 Internship
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6323
    Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

  • CNMA 6285 INTERNSHIP

    CNMA 6285 Internship
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6323
    Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

  • CNMA 6285 INTERNSHIP

    CNMA 6285 Internship
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6323
    Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

  • CNMA 6310 FAITH, CULTURE & THE ARTS

    CNMA 6310 Faith, Culture, and the Arts
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores the role of the Christian artist in culture. Students will study how great Christian thinkers have thought about culture and art throughout church history and be challenged to understand their vocation as artists and media creators from a biblical perspective. Students will also develop an understanding of how to live out their faith through their work as they seek to affect the culture around them. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • CNMA 6310 FAITH, CULTURE & THE ARTS

    CNMA 6310 Faith, Culture, and the Arts
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores the role of the Christian artist in culture. Students will study how great Christian thinkers have thought about culture and art throughout church history and be challenged to understand their vocation as artists and media creators from a biblical perspective. Students will also develop an understanding of how to live out their faith through their work as they seek to affect the culture around them. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • CNMA 6320 TPCS/GNRS: FILMMKRS ON CINEMA

    CNMA 6320 Topics & Genres: Filmmakers on Cinema
    Prerequisite(s): None
    These courses examine cinematic techniques for filmmakers through the lens of other cinematic artists. This course is programmed each semester to expose students to a broad range of cinematic styles and approaches. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • CNMA 6320 TPCS/GNRS: FILMMKRS ON CINEMA

    CNMA 6320 Topics & Genres: Filmmakers on Cinema
    Prerequisite(s): None
    These courses examine cinematic techniques for filmmakers through the lens of other cinematic artists. This course is programmed each semester to expose students to a broad range of cinematic styles and approaches. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • CNMA 6321 CINEMATIC CORE PRINCIPLES

    CNMA 6321 Cinematic Core Principles
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An overview and survey of the cinematic medium and its various forms, with an emphasis on historical foundations and developing opportunities. Includes an in-depth look at the fundamental components of the medium – writing, directing, acting, cinematography, and editing – and synthesizes these various roles so that students can experience how these components work together to create the end product. Building off of small exercises, students will produce short films in this course.

  • CNMA 6321 CINEMATIC CORE PRINCIPLES

    CNMA 6321 Cinematic Core Principles
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An overview and survey of the cinematic medium and its various forms, with an emphasis on historical foundations and developing opportunities. Includes an in-depth look at the fundamental components of the medium – writing, directing, acting, cinematography, and editing – and synthesizes these various roles so that students can experience how these components work together to create the end product. Building off of small exercises, students will produce short films in this course.

  • CNMA 6322 ART OF STORYTELLING

    CNMA 6322 Art of Storytelling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An overview and survey of storytelling across multiple mediums, from ancient oral tradition to modern media. This class will explore the role storytelling plays in culture and help prepare students in the development, presentation, and pitching of stories.

  • CNMA 6322 ART OF STORYTELLING

    CNMA 6322 Art of Storytelling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An overview and survey of storytelling across multiple mediums, from ancient oral tradition to modern media. This class will explore the role storytelling plays in culture and help prepare students in the development, presentation, and pitching of stories.

  • CNMA 6323 MEDIA INDUSTRY & BUSINESS

    CNMA 6323 Media Industry & Business
    Prerequisite(s) None
    An overview of the business and legal elements that will affect students’ work, whether as independent filmmakers or in industry careers. This class also examines the changing dynamics in the digital economy and trains students in the art of pitching and presentation.

  • CNMA 6323 MEDIA INDUSTRY & BUSINESS

    CNMA 6323 Media Industry & Business
    Prerequisite(s) None
    An overview of the business and legal elements that will affect students’ work, whether as independent filmmakers or in industry careers. This class also examines the changing dynamics in the digital economy and trains students in the art of pitching and presentation.

  • CNMA 6331 SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP

    CNMA 6331 Screenwriting Workshop
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A writing workshop in which students will create and revise original screenplays. Over the course of the semester students will learn to critically assess their own work as well as the work of their peers. CNMA 6331 is an introduction to the screenwriting workshop.

  • CNMA 6331 SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP

    CNMA 6331 Screenwriting Workshop
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A writing workshop in which students will create and revise original screenplays. Over the course of the semester students will learn to critically assess their own work as well as the work of their peers. CNMA 6331 is an introduction to the screenwriting workshop.

  • CNMA 6332 SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP I I

    CNMA 6332 Screenwriting Workshop II
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6331
    A writing workshop in which students will create and revise original screenplays. Over the course of the semester students will learn to critically assess their own work as well as the work of their peers. CNMA 6332 builds upon the experience and skills acquired in CNMA 6331.

  • CNMA 6332 SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP I I

    CNMA 6332 Screenwriting Workshop II
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6331
    A writing workshop in which students will create and revise original screenplays. Over the course of the semester students will learn to critically assess their own work as well as the work of their peers. CNMA 6332 builds upon the experience and skills acquired in CNMA 6331.

  • CNMA 6333 SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP III

    CNMA 6333 Screenwriting Workshop III
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6332
    A writing workshop in which students will create and revise original screenplays. Over the course of the semester students will learn to critically assess their own work as well as the work of their peers. CNMA 6333 builds upon the experience and skills acquired in CNMA 6331 and 6332.

  • CNMA 6333 SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP III

    CNMA 6333 Screenwriting Workshop III
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6332
    A writing workshop in which students will create and revise original screenplays. Over the course of the semester students will learn to critically assess their own work as well as the work of their peers. CNMA 6333 builds upon the experience and skills acquired in CNMA 6331 and 6332.

  • CNMA 6334 SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP IV

    CNMA 6334 Screenwriting Workshop II
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6333
    A writing workshop in which students will create and revise original screenplays. Over the course of the semester students will learn to critically assess their own work as well as the work of their peers. CNMA 6334 builds upon the experience and skills acquired in CNMA 6331, 6332, and 6333.

  • CNMA 6334 SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP IV

    CNMA 6334 Screenwriting Workshop II
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6333
    A writing workshop in which students will create and revise original screenplays. Over the course of the semester students will learn to critically assess their own work as well as the work of their peers. CNMA 6334 builds upon the experience and skills acquired in CNMA 6331, 6332, and 6333.

  • CNMA 6380 SPECIAL TOPICS

    CNMA 6380 Special Topics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Special topics and projects are determined based on student interest and need, faculty availability, and subject matter that would be supportive of the Cinema & New Media Arts curriculum. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • CNMA 6380 SPECIAL TOPICS

    CNMA 6380 Special Topics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Special topics and projects are determined based on student interest and need, faculty availability, and subject matter that would be supportive of the Cinema & New Media Arts curriculum. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • CNMA 6385 INTERNSHIP

    CNMA 6385 Internship
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6323
    Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

  • CNMA 6385 INTERNSHIP

    CNMA 6385 Internship
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6323
    Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

  • CNMA 6391 THESIS PROJECT I

    CNMA 6391 Thesis Project I
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6390
    Under the direction of a faculty mentor, students will write or produce a faculty-approved cinematic thesis.

  • CNMA 6391 THESIS PROJECT I

    CNMA 6391 Thesis Project I
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6390
    Under the direction of a faculty mentor, students will write or produce a faculty-approved cinematic thesis.

  • CNMA 6392 THESIS PROJECT II

    CNMA 6392 Thesis Project II
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6390
    Under the direction of a faculty mentor, students will write or produce a faculty-approved cinematic thesis.

  • CNMA 6392 THESIS PROJECT II

    CNMA 6392 Thesis Project II
    Prerequisite(s): CNMA 6390
    Under the direction of a faculty mentor, students will write or produce a faculty-approved cinematic thesis.

  • COMM 1101 FORENSIC WORKSHOP

    COMM 1101 Forensic Workshop
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor
    Workshop for students who actively compete in mock trial tournaments. A maximum of four credit hours may be counted toward a degree.

  • COMM 1323 RHETORIC AND PUBLIC SPEAKING

    COMM 1323 Rhetoric and Public Speaking
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course improves communication skills in a variety of contexts and develops an understanding and appreciation of the importance of public rhetoric in a democratic society. Since ancient Greek and Roman times, rhetoric has been taught both as the foundation of a liberal arts education and as an essential skill of democratic citizenship.

  • COMM 2101 FORENSIC WORKSHOP

    COMM 2101 Forensic Workshop
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor
    Workshop for students who actively compete in mock trial tournaments. A maximum of four credit hours may be counted toward a degree.

  • COMM 3101 FORENSIC WORKSHOP

    COMM 3101 Forensic Workshop
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor
    Workshop for students who actively compete in mock trial tournaments. A maximum of four credit hours may be counted toward a degree.

  • COMM 3323 COMMUNICATION THEORY

    COMM 3323 Communication Theory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The class provides a comprehensive view of the theoretical traditions that influence our understanding of communication.

  • COMM 3324 LEGAL COMMUNICATION

    COMM 3324 Legal Communication
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the central role that communication occupies in the study, practice, and understanding of the legal process. Students will be introduced to key elements of the communication process relevant in all criminal justice and legal settings and will learn basic and advanced principles of trial advocacy through participation in a mock trial.

  • COMM 3334 ARGUMENTATION AND ADVOCACY

    COMM 3334 Argumentation and Advocacy
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores the nature, types, effects, and ethical dimensions of argument. Current public policy issues will be considered in classroom discussions, with the goal of teaching students how to express themselves clearly in speaking and writing.

  • COMM 4101 FORENSIC WORKSHOP

    COMM 4101 Forensic Workshop
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor
    Workshop for students who actively compete in mock trial tournaments. A maximum of four semester hours may be counted toward a degree.

  • COMM 4304 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    COMM 4304 Interpersonal Communication
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the theory and practice of person-to-person interaction. Examines such topics as self-disclosure, trust, emotions, perception and language, intimacy and distance, and conflict resolution.

  • COMM 4314 GREAT AMERICAN SPEECHES

    COMM 4314 American Public Address
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the speakers and speeches that have shaped our history from colonial America to the present. The tools of rhetorical criticism will be developed and applied.

  • COMM 4315 POLITICAL COMMUNICATION

    COMM 4315 Political Communication
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course investigates the role of communication in contemporary American politics. Topics to be discussed include speeches, rhetorical artifacts, and political campaigns.

  • COMM 4323 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

    COMM 4323 Intercultural Communication
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the impact of globalization, technology, travel, and immigration on communication. The effects of culture and experience on perception are also studied.

  • COMM 4373 INTERNSHIP: COMMUNICATIONS

    COMM 4373 Internship in Speech Communication
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    Directed work experience in a variety of public and private organizations. The primary objective of this course is to provide students with opportunities to apply speech communication theory and practice in a career-oriented setting. Also provides students with the opportunity to attain applied research experience.

  • COMM 6310 INTERCULTURAL COMM/LDRSHP

    COMM 6310 Intercultural Communication and Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will study principles of intercultural communication from the fields of social psychology, cultural anthropology, and communication theory integrated with selected areas of personal encounter in cross-cultural settings. It will also look at the nature of Christian leadership, primarily in the context of international missions. Attention is given to various character qualities and leadership competencies necessary for effectiveness in cross-cultural ministry.

  • COSC 1351 INTRO TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

    COSC 1351 Introduction to Computer Programming
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1434
    an overview of the field of computing, applications, algorithms, data structures, rudimentary programming, machine architecture, digital logic, history, impact, and current trends. Introductory programming using an objects-first approach. Problem analysis and solution. Introductory modeling and abstraction. Documentation, good programming practices. Data and control structures as needed.

  • COSC 1352 INTERMEDI COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

    COSC 1352 Intermediate Computer Programming
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1434 and COSC 1351
    An introduction to computer programming using an objects first approach; problem solving; an overview of the field of computing. Analysis, design and implementation of programs. Application structures, algorithm development, event-driven programming, graphical user interfaces, exception handling, recursion.

  • COSC 2351 DATA STRUCTURES

    COSC 2351 Data Structures
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 1412 and MATH 1434 or a satisfactory score on an HBU required math placement test
    The definition, representation, and manipulation of basic data structures such as arrays, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Practical applications of these structures will be emphasized.

  • COSC 2352 SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING

    COSC 2352 Systems Programming
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 1412 and MATH 1434 or a satisfactory score on an HBU required math placement test
    An introduction to systems programming within the context of C/C++ and Linux; topics include linking, writing scripts, performing system calls, managing memory, and using concurrency.

  • COSC 2353 OPERATING SYSTEMS

    COSC 2353 Operating Systems
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 2352
    An introduction to operating systems concepts. Topics include process management, storage management, device management, performance, security, and case studies of modern operating systems.

  • COSC 3341 COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE

    COSC 3341 Computer Architecture
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 2351
    Architecture and organization of computer systems. Topics include the processor, control unit and microprogramming, computer arithmetic, memory hierarchy and memory management, input/output, instruction sets.

  • COSC 3351 ADV DATA STRUCTURES/ALGORITHMS

    COSC 3351 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 2351 and MATH 1451
    Advanced data structures and algorithm design. Topics include specialized trees, graphs, sets and tables, advanced searching and sorting, complexity analysis, and algorithm design techniques.

  • COSC 3352 THEORY OF COMPUTING

    COSC 3352 Theory of Computing
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 2351 and MATH 2323
    An overview of formal languages, the abstract models of computing capable of recognizing those languages, and the grammars used to generate them.

  • COSC 3353 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

    COSC 3353 Programming Languages
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 3351
    Techniques for specifying the syntax and semantics of programming languages. Language concepts; execution environments, comparative analysis of programming languages.

  • COSC 4331 INTRODUCTION TO CYBER SECURITY

    COSC 4331 Introduction to Cyber Security
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 2353 and permission of instructor
    overview of cyber security; provides students with practical cyber security experience based on theoretical foundations. Topics include: computer network defense, computer network attack, wireless security.

  • COSC 4351 COMPUTER NETWORKS

    COSC 4351 Computer Networks
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 3351
    An overview of computer networks. Topics include network topologies, layers, local area networks, and performance measurement and analysis.

  • COUN 5309 COUNSELOR PROF ID & FUNCTION

    COUN 5309 Counselor Professional Identity and Function
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide students with didactic and experiential training as a general orientation to the helping relationship and the broader counseling profession, including the basic counseling skills and spiritual orientation used in the relationship between a counselor and the person(s) seeking help. A multi-level focus looks at the roles and characteristics of the counselor and counselee, including one’s worldview and belief system. In addition, attention is given to understanding the ethical and personal nature of the helping relationship, as well as available resources, which may be mobilized as growth producing and change agents.

  • COUN 5309 COUNSELOR PROF ID & FUNCTION

    COUN 5309 Counselor Professional Identity and Function
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide students with didactic and experiential training as a general orientation to the helping relationship and the broader counseling profession, including the basic counseling skills and spiritual orientation used in the relationship between a counselor and the person(s) seeking help. A multi-level focus looks at the roles and characteristics of the counselor and counselee, including one’s worldview and belief system. In addition, attention is given to understanding the ethical and personal nature of the helping relationship, as well as available resources, which may be mobilized as growth producing and change agents.

  • COUN 5310 ETHICAL & LEGAL ISSUES IN COUN

    COUN 5310 Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to concepts and principles regarding ethical, legal, and liability related issues and responsibilities encountered by students, residents, and licensed professional counselors, including professional codes of ethics, ethical and legal aspects of practice, and the impact of values, beliefs, and cultural norms on ethical dilemmas and decision making.

  • COUN 5310 ETHICAL & LEGAL ISSUES IN COUN

    COUN 5310 Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to concepts and principles regarding ethical, legal, and liability related issues and responsibilities encountered by students, residents, and licensed professional counselors, including professional codes of ethics, ethical and legal aspects of practice, and the impact of values, beliefs, and cultural norms on ethical dilemmas and decision making.

  • COUN 5311 ADVANCE ETHICS & PRACTICE MGMT

    COUN 5311 Advanced Ethics and Practice Management
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5310
    This course builds on COUN 5310 in the development of counselor ethics and understanding of state law specific to the counseling profession. Topics include but are not limited to: medical records management, an overview of business/family law, professional practice issues and guidelines, and the study of current regulatory board rules. This course is required by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors (TSBEPC)

  • COUN 5311 ADVANCE ETHICS & PRACTICE MGMT

    COUN 5311 Advanced Ethics and Practice Management
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5310
    This course builds on COUN 5310 in the development of counselor ethics and understanding of state law specific to the counseling profession. Topics include but are not limited to: medical records management, an overview of business/family law, professional practice issues and guidelines, and the study of current regulatory board rules. This course is required by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors (TSBEPC)

  • COUN 5312 MARRIAGE/COUPLE/FAMILY THEORY

    COUN 5312 Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling Theories
    Prerequisite(s): None
    this course is an introduction to the field of couples and family therapy. It will feature theory and practice in the treatment of dyadic relationships, marriages, and families (including families with children). Students will develop an understanding of the prominent theories, including emphasis on systems theories that form the basis of relevant therapy approaches. (Offered also as PSYC 5312.)

  • COUN 5312 MARRIAGE/COUPLE/FAMILY THEORY

    COUN 5312 Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling Theories
    Prerequisite(s): None
    this course is an introduction to the field of couples and family therapy. It will feature theory and practice in the treatment of dyadic relationships, marriages, and families (including families with children). Students will develop an understanding of the prominent theories, including emphasis on systems theories that form the basis of relevant therapy approaches. (Offered also as PSYC 5312.)

  • COUN 5313 METHODS/TECHNIQUES:COUNSELING

    COUN 5313 Methods and Techniques in Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will introduce the student to those counseling skills which communicate the qualities of empathy, genuineness, and unconditional positive regard, and which facilitate building the foundation of the therapeutic working alliance. The course will include extensive skills-practice, role-playing, and videotaped exercises. Intake skills and additional counseling techniques will be introduced didactically and practiced in class. Course is offered only in residential format. (Offered also as PSYC 5313).

  • COUN 5313 METHODS/TECHNIQUES:COUNSELING

    COUN 5313 Methods and Techniques in Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will introduce the student to those counseling skills which communicate the qualities of empathy, genuineness, and unconditional positive regard, and which facilitate building the foundation of the therapeutic working alliance. The course will include extensive skills-practice, role-playing, and videotaped exercises. Intake skills and additional counseling techniques will be introduced didactically and practiced in class. Course is offered only in residential format. (Offered also as PSYC 5313).

  • COUN 5314 MTHDS/TECHNQS CHRI COUNSELING

    COUN 5314 Methods and Techniques in Christian Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to introduce graduate students to basic techniques, methods, and theories behind the practice of Christian counseling and to integrate established psychotherapeutic techniques into the practice of Christian counseling. The course will include extensive skills-practice, role-playing, and videotaped exercises. Intake skills and additional counseling techniques will be introduced didactically and practiced in class. Course is offered only in residential format.

  • COUN 5314 MTHDS/TECHNQS CHRI COUNSELING

    COUN 5314 Methods and Techniques in Christian Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to introduce graduate students to basic techniques, methods, and theories behind the practice of Christian counseling and to integrate established psychotherapeutic techniques into the practice of Christian counseling. The course will include extensive skills-practice, role-playing, and videotaped exercises. Intake skills and additional counseling techniques will be introduced didactically and practiced in class. Course is offered only in residential format.

  • COUN 5315 CHRI INTEGRATION SEMINAR I

    COUN 5315 Christian Integration Seminar I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide students with didactic and experiential training as a general orientation to the helping relationship and the broader counseling profession. This course is also designed to help students effectively integrate their Christian faith with principles of psychology and counseling. Theological backgrounds of counseling, major theories of Christian integration with counseling, and the role of the Christian counselor in society will be examined. Students will formulate their own Christian integration perspectives.

  • COUN 5315 CHRI INTEGRATION SEMINAR I

    COUN 5315 Christian Integration Seminar I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide students with didactic and experiential training as a general orientation to the helping relationship and the broader counseling profession. This course is also designed to help students effectively integrate their Christian faith with principles of psychology and counseling. Theological backgrounds of counseling, major theories of Christian integration with counseling, and the role of the Christian counselor in society will be examined. Students will formulate their own Christian integration perspectives.

  • COUN 5316 HUMAN GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT

    COUN 5316 Human Growth and Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides intensive study and examination of literature and theories of individual and family development across the lifespan from infancy through adulthood. Social and personality development, intellectual development, language acquisition, learning theories, and developmental expectations are emphasized, including biological, neurological, and physiological factors that affect human development, function, and behavior.

  • COUN 5316 HUMAN GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT

    COUN 5316 Human Growth and Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides intensive study and examination of literature and theories of individual and family development across the lifespan from infancy through adulthood. Social and personality development, intellectual development, language acquisition, learning theories, and developmental expectations are emphasized, including biological, neurological, and physiological factors that affect human development, function, and behavior.

  • COUN 5317 MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING

    COUN 5317 Multicultural Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course addresses social and cultural diversity, as well as the need for multicultural awareness and competency among counselors and other mental health providers. Included in the study are theories of multicultural counseling, dimensions of spirituality and worldviews, racial/cultural identity development, social justice and advocacy, counseling ethnic minorities, and other various sociocultural minorities. Students will gain practical knowledge and skills necessary to work effectively with ethnically and culturally diverse clints, their attitudes, beliefs, and acculturative experiences both nationally and internationally.

  • COUN 5317 MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING

    COUN 5317 Multicultural Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course addresses social and cultural diversity, as well as the need for multicultural awareness and competency among counselors and other mental health providers. Included in the study are theories of multicultural counseling, dimensions of spirituality and worldviews, racial/cultural identity development, social justice and advocacy, counseling ethnic minorities, and other various sociocultural minorities. Students will gain practical knowledge and skills necessary to work effectively with ethnically and culturally diverse clints, their attitudes, beliefs, and acculturative experiences both nationally and internationally.

  • COUN 5318 COUNSELING SKILLS & TECHNIQUES

    COUN 5318 Counseling Skills and Techniques
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310, and COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course introduces students to those counseling skills and techniques, which communicate the qualities of empathy, genuineness, and unconditional positive regard, and which facilitate building the foundation of an effective therapeutic working alliance. The course includes videotaped exercises along with an intensive supervised counseling experience on campus designed to enhance self-awareness and promote personality exploration. Intake skills, extensive skills-practice, role-playing, and additional counseling techniques will be introduced didactically and practiced during the residency portion of the class. (This course includes both long distance and residential components.)

  • COUN 5318 COUNSELING SKILLS & TECHNIQUES

    COUN 5318 Counseling Skills and Techniques
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310, and COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course introduces students to those counseling skills and techniques, which communicate the qualities of empathy, genuineness, and unconditional positive regard, and which facilitate building the foundation of an effective therapeutic working alliance. The course includes videotaped exercises along with an intensive supervised counseling experience on campus designed to enhance self-awareness and promote personality exploration. Intake skills, extensive skills-practice, role-playing, and additional counseling techniques will be introduced didactically and practiced during the residency portion of the class. (This course includes both long distance and residential components.)

  • COUN 5319 SPIRITUALITY, THEOLOGY & COUNS

    COUN 5310 Spirituality, Theology, and Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to help students effectively integrate their Christian faith with principles of psychology and counseling. Theological backgrounds and historical foundations of faith-based counseling, major theories and models of Christian integration with counseling, and the role of the Christian counselor in society will be examined. Students will formulate their own Christian integration perspectives. (Offered also as MAPC 5301)

  • COUN 5319 SPIRITUALITY, THEOLOGY & COUNS

    COUN 5310 Spirituality, Theology, and Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to help students effectively integrate their Christian faith with principles of psychology and counseling. Theological backgrounds and historical foundations of faith-based counseling, major theories and models of Christian integration with counseling, and the role of the Christian counselor in society will be examined. Students will formulate their own Christian integration perspectives. (Offered also as MAPC 5301)

  • COUN 5320 THEORIES OF COUNSELING

    COUN 5320 Theories of Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides a comprehensive and intensive study of major personality models and theoretical orientations used in counseling and psychotherapy, stressing implications for research and practice. Various psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, and family systems theories are summarized and evaluated. Students will have an opportunity to compare the compatibility of these theories with the Christian tradition and to begin an integration of these theories in clinical practice.

  • COUN 5320 THEORIES OF COUNSELING

    COUN 5320 Theories of Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides a comprehensive and intensive study of major personality models and theoretical orientations used in counseling and psychotherapy, stressing implications for research and practice. Various psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, and family systems theories are summarized and evaluated. Students will have an opportunity to compare the compatibility of these theories with the Christian tradition and to begin an integration of these theories in clinical practice.

  • COUN 5321 GROUP COUN & PSYCHOTHERAPY

    COUN 5321 Group Counseling and Psychotherapy
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310 and COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course is designed to provide students with a conceptual and practical overview of group dynamics including the role of group leadership, tools for forming and facilitating a group, and orientation of members. Emphasis will be given to leadership techniques used at various stages of the group process, as well as applicable ethical issues. Students will be provided with an intensive supervised group experience on campus during the residency portion of the class to promote self-awareness, develop interpersonal and facilitator skills, and explore biblical principles relevant to the group process. (This course includes both long distance and residential components.)

  • COUN 5321 GROUP COUN & PSYCHOTHERAPY

    COUN 5321 Group Counseling and Psychotherapy
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310 and COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course is designed to provide students with a conceptual and practical overview of group dynamics including the role of group leadership, tools for forming and facilitating a group, and orientation of members. Emphasis will be given to leadership techniques used at various stages of the group process, as well as applicable ethical issues. Students will be provided with an intensive supervised group experience on campus during the residency portion of the class to promote self-awareness, develop interpersonal and facilitator skills, and explore biblical principles relevant to the group process. (This course includes both long distance and residential components.)

  • COUN 5323 THEORIES COUNSLNG/PSYCHOTHERPY

    COUN 5323 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5313 or COUN 5314
    Comprehensive and intensive study of major theoretical orientations in counseling and psychotherapy, stressing implications for research and practice. Includes experiences in micro-counseling and other simulations to develop counseling skills. Course is offered only in residential format. (Offered also as PSYC 5323).

  • COUN 5323 THEORIES COUNSLNG/PSYCHOTHERPY

    COUN 5323 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5313 or COUN 5314
    Comprehensive and intensive study of major theoretical orientations in counseling and psychotherapy, stressing implications for research and practice. Includes experiences in micro-counseling and other simulations to develop counseling skills. Course is offered only in residential format. (Offered also as PSYC 5323).

  • COUN 5326 PSYC DYING BEREAVMNT COUNSLNG

    COUN 5326 Psychology of Dying, Bereavement, and Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course dealing with the process of dying and grief of the survivors. The psychological adjustments of the individual, family, and professional are examined. How to facilitate grief as well as therapeutic issues are discussed.

  • COUN 5326 PSYC DYING BEREAVMNT COUNSLNG

    COUN 5326 Psychology of Dying, Bereavement, and Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course dealing with the process of dying and grief of the survivors. The psychological adjustments of the individual, family, and professional are examined. How to facilitate grief as well as therapeutic issues are discussed.

  • COUN 5363 PRINS OF SCHOOL COUNSELING

    COUN 5363 Principles of School Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Introduction to the philosophical and historical foundations of guidance and counseling, stressing practical problems of organizing and implementing guidance programs in the secondary and elementary schools. Consideration is given to professional issues, present and future, as they impact the role and function of the counselor. Includes the design of guidance and counseling programs for an elementary, secondary, or postsecondary institution.

  • COUN 5363 PRINS OF SCHOOL COUNSELING

    COUN 5363 Principles of School Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Introduction to the philosophical and historical foundations of guidance and counseling, stressing practical problems of organizing and implementing guidance programs in the secondary and elementary schools. Consideration is given to professional issues, present and future, as they impact the role and function of the counselor. Includes the design of guidance and counseling programs for an elementary, secondary, or postsecondary institution.

  • COUN 6191 COUNSELING PRACTICUM

    COUN 6191 Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, PSYC 5360, PSYC 6301, PSYC 6302, COUN 6306, 6308, PSYC 6310, PSYC 6320
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. Course is offered only in residential format.

  • COUN 6191 COUNSELING PRACTICUM

    COUN 6191 Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, PSYC 5360, PSYC 6301, PSYC 6302, COUN 6306, 6308, PSYC 6310, PSYC 6320
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. Course is offered only in residential format.

  • COUN 6192 ADV COUNSELING PRACTICUM

    COUN 6192 Advanced Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6191
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. May be repeated for credit.

  • COUN 6192 ADV COUNSELING PRACTICUM

    COUN 6192 Advanced Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6191
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. May be repeated for credit.

  • COUN 6197 LICENSURE STANDARDS REVIEW

    COUN 6197 Licensure Standards Review
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, COUN 5360, COUN 6301, COUN 6302, COUN 6306, COUN 6308, COUN 6310, COUN 6320; overall GPA 3.0 or higher.
    This preparation course is a one-hour course, taught by a core faculty member. This course review national standards, study strategies, and assess students’ base knowledge in each area covered on the National Counselor Exam. Students must pass this class with a B or better, and they may not score lower than 80% on more than two individual exams. In this case, they are required to retake the course before becoming eligible to sit for the oral comprehensive exam in the licensure-based graduate programs in counseling. Students with a GPA of 3.75 or higher are not required to take COUN 6197

  • COUN 6197 LICENSURE STANDARDS REVIEW

    COUN 6197 Licensure Standards Review
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, COUN 5360, COUN 6301, COUN 6302, COUN 6306, COUN 6308, COUN 6310, COUN 6320; overall GPA 3.0 or higher.
    This preparation course is a one-hour course, taught by a core faculty member. This course review national standards, study strategies, and assess students’ base knowledge in each area covered on the National Counselor Exam. Students must pass this class with a B or better, and they may not score lower than 80% on more than two individual exams. In this case, they are required to retake the course before becoming eligible to sit for the oral comprehensive exam in the licensure-based graduate programs in counseling. Students with a GPA of 3.75 or higher are not required to take COUN 6197

  • COUN 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    COUN 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • COUN 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    COUN 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • COUN 6291 COUNSELING PRACTICUM

    COUN 6291 Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, PSYC 5360, PSYC 6301, PSYC 6302, COUN 6306, 6308, PSYC 6310, PSYC 6320, and successful completion of Oral Comprehensive Exam.
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. Course is offered only in residential format. May be repeated for credit.

  • COUN 6291 COUNSELING PRACTICUM

    COUN 6291 Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, PSYC 5360, PSYC 6301, PSYC 6302, COUN 6306, 6308, PSYC 6310, PSYC 6320, and successful completion of Oral Comprehensive Exam.
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. Course is offered only in residential format. May be repeated for credit.

  • COUN 6301 SINGLE ADULT ISSUES PREMRTL

    COUN 6301 Single Adult Issues, Premarital Counseling, and Marital Enrichment Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5312
    This course provides an in-depth study of single adult lifestyle issues, cohabitating concerns, as well as covering premarital counseling tests, and marital enrichment programs.

  • COUN 6301 SINGLE ADULT ISSUES PREMRTL

    COUN 6301 Single Adult Issues, Premarital Counseling, and Marital Enrichment Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5312
    This course provides an in-depth study of single adult lifestyle issues, cohabitating concerns, as well as covering premarital counseling tests, and marital enrichment programs.

  • COUN 6302 COUNSLNG ADOLESCNTS & FAMILIES

    COUN 6302 Counseling Adolescents and Their Families
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the adolescent’s developmental and relationship factors that ca lead to counseling issues. Child and adolescent psychopathology diagnoses will be discussed. Techniques and practices for working with adolescents will be explored.

  • COUN 6302 COUNSLNG ADOLESCNTS & FAMILIES

    COUN 6302 Counseling Adolescents and Their Families
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the adolescent’s developmental and relationship factors that ca lead to counseling issues. Child and adolescent psychopathology diagnoses will be discussed. Techniques and practices for working with adolescents will be explored.

  • COUN 6303 INTRO TO HUMAN SEXUALITY

    COUN 6303 Introduction to Human Sexuality
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This is an introductory course about human sexuality. It will survey a variety of topics from biological to psychological to social aspects of human sexuality. This course will provide a scientific understanding of the historical, biological, psychological and social/cultural influences on human sexuality and its expression. Information about human sexuality across the lifespan will be included. This course provides information about sexual identity, orientation, and how changing sexual attitudes are influencing the culture. This course also provides information about the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections.

  • COUN 6303 INTRO TO HUMAN SEXUALITY

    COUN 6303 Introduction to Human Sexuality
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This is an introductory course about human sexuality. It will survey a variety of topics from biological to psychological to social aspects of human sexuality. This course will provide a scientific understanding of the historical, biological, psychological and social/cultural influences on human sexuality and its expression. Information about human sexuality across the lifespan will be included. This course provides information about sexual identity, orientation, and how changing sexual attitudes are influencing the culture. This course also provides information about the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections.

  • COUN 6304 GENDER ISSUES AND DIFFERENCES

    COUN 6304 Gender Issues and Differences
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the most common problems women and men bring to counseling, including both developmental and situational crises. It explores biblical perspectives and the most effective treatments for these situations.

  • COUN 6304 GENDER ISSUES AND DIFFERENCES

    COUN 6304 Gender Issues and Differences
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the most common problems women and men bring to counseling, including both developmental and situational crises. It explores biblical perspectives and the most effective treatments for these situations.

  • COUN 6305 SOLDIERS/VETS: ISSUES/CHALLENG

    COUN 6305 Today’s Soldiers and Veterans: Contemporary Issues and Challenges
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is an introduction to the issues specific to the military and veteran population. Students develop an understanding of military and veteran culture, as well as an introduction to common concerns such as transition to civilian life, suicide, underemployment, and relationships.

  • COUN 6305 SOLDIERS/VETS: ISSUES/CHALLENG

    COUN 6305 Today’s Soldiers and Veterans: Contemporary Issues and Challenges
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is an introduction to the issues specific to the military and veteran population. Students develop an understanding of military and veteran culture, as well as an introduction to common concerns such as transition to civilian life, suicide, underemployment, and relationships.

  • COUN 6306 CAREER INFO & COUNSELING

    COUN 6306 Career Information and Career Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is focused on methods and processes of collecting, organizing, evaluating, and interpreting educational, occupational, and personal-social information for the purpose of helping others to engage in meaningful, satisfying vocations. The major theories of career development are emphasized. (Offered also as PSYC 6306)

  • COUN 6306 CAREER INFO & COUNSELING

    COUN 6306 Career Information and Career Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is focused on methods and processes of collecting, organizing, evaluating, and interpreting educational, occupational, and personal-social information for the purpose of helping others to engage in meaningful, satisfying vocations. The major theories of career development are emphasized. (Offered also as PSYC 6306)

  • COUN 6307 MILITARY FAMILIES DEPLYMNT REI

    COUN 6307 Military Families, Deployment and Reintegration
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6305
    This course examines the two primary transitions of military life: the reintegration challenges that recently deployed military members encounter as they blend back into family, community, church, and a peacetime setting; and the transition from military to civilian life and career. Students will identify strategies meant to facilitate a positive adjustment and support veterans in this transition back into family and community life as well as new careers. Specific course content will focus on the role of the caregiver or helping professional, with an emphasis on provision of resources.

  • COUN 6307 MILITARY FAMILIES DEPLYMNT REI

    COUN 6307 Military Families, Deployment and Reintegration
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6305
    This course examines the two primary transitions of military life: the reintegration challenges that recently deployed military members encounter as they blend back into family, community, church, and a peacetime setting; and the transition from military to civilian life and career. Students will identify strategies meant to facilitate a positive adjustment and support veterans in this transition back into family and community life as well as new careers. Specific course content will focus on the role of the caregiver or helping professional, with an emphasis on provision of resources.

  • COUN 6308 METHODS OF GROUP PROCESS

    COUN 6308 Methods of Group Process
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5313 and COUN 5323
    This is a course in learning how to lead out-patient psychotherapy/counseling groups. The dynamics of group process are described and theories of psychotherapy are applied to groups. Students design a psychoeducational group manual. Groups are conducted and led by students for at least ten (10) hours of class time, which allows students opportunities to practice group leadership. Feedback is provided by classmates and the professor. Course is offered only in residential format. (Offered also as PSYC 6308)

  • COUN 6308 METHODS OF GROUP PROCESS

    COUN 6308 Methods of Group Process
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5313 and COUN 5323
    This is a course in learning how to lead out-patient psychotherapy/counseling groups. The dynamics of group process are described and theories of psychotherapy are applied to groups. Students design a psychoeducational group manual. Groups are conducted and led by students for at least ten (10) hours of class time, which allows students opportunities to practice group leadership. Feedback is provided by classmates and the professor. Course is offered only in residential format. (Offered also as PSYC 6308)

  • COUN 6309 ASSESSMENT & TESTING

    COUN 6309 Assessment and Testing
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6310
    This course is an introduction to psychological and counseling assessment and appraisal techniques used in the evaluation of people exhibiting mental, emotional, and/or behavioral disturbances with an emphasis on the therapeutic analysis, synthesis, and utilization of assessment data as part of the treatment process. Standardized and nonstandardized data information gathering methods, validity, reliability, psychometric statistics, factors influencing appraisals, use and interpretation of appraisal results, and report writing with a variety of populations are explored. Aptitude, achievement, interest, behavioral, and personality instruments are presented, as well as ethical, legal, and cultural implications.

  • COUN 6309 ASSESSMENT & TESTING

    COUN 6309 Assessment and Testing
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6310
    This course is an introduction to psychological and counseling assessment and appraisal techniques used in the evaluation of people exhibiting mental, emotional, and/or behavioral disturbances with an emphasis on the therapeutic analysis, synthesis, and utilization of assessment data as part of the treatment process. Standardized and nonstandardized data information gathering methods, validity, reliability, psychometric statistics, factors influencing appraisals, use and interpretation of appraisal results, and report writing with a variety of populations are explored. Aptitude, achievement, interest, behavioral, and personality instruments are presented, as well as ethical, legal, and cultural implications.

  • COUN 6310 CLINICAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

    COUN 6310 Clinical Psychopathology
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course addresses the principles of understanding dysfunction in human behavior and systemic organization as well as an in-depth review of a broad spectrum of psychopathological conditions as defined in the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The course addresses the etiology, prevalence and incidence, signs and symptoms, and criteria for differential diagnoses, utilizing diagnostic, preventive, and remedial methods and interventions. Emphasis will be given on comparing and contrasting different theoretical perspectives and reviewing the empirical literature for various disorders.

  • COUN 6310 CLINICAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

    COUN 6310 Clinical Psychopathology
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course addresses the principles of understanding dysfunction in human behavior and systemic organization as well as an in-depth review of a broad spectrum of psychopathological conditions as defined in the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The course addresses the etiology, prevalence and incidence, signs and symptoms, and criteria for differential diagnoses, utilizing diagnostic, preventive, and remedial methods and interventions. Emphasis will be given on comparing and contrasting different theoretical perspectives and reviewing the empirical literature for various disorders.

  • COUN 6311 SUBSTANCE USE/ADDICTIVE DISORD

    COUN 6311 Substance Use and Addictive Disorders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines a variety of models for the etiology and treatment of addictions using a biopsychosocial perspective. Substance use is emphasized, but other problematic behaviors (e.g., gambling, sex) are covered. Spirituality is highlighted as a protective factor and as part of the treatment process.

  • COUN 6311 SUBSTANCE USE/ADDICTIVE DISORD

    COUN 6311 Substance Use and Addictive Disorders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines a variety of models for the etiology and treatment of addictions using a biopsychosocial perspective. Substance use is emphasized, but other problematic behaviors (e.g., gambling, sex) are covered. Spirituality is highlighted as a protective factor and as part of the treatment process.

  • COUN 6312 PTSD: CAUSES/PROBLEMS/THERAPY

    COUN 6312 PTSD: Causes, Problems, and Therapy
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6330
    This course focuses on the development and treatment of PTSD, including sources of trauma such as combat stress, severe accidents, sexual assaults, etc. Adjustment problems in the physical, mental, relational and spiritual areas of life will be covered. Various types of therapy for PTSD will be discussed and practiced.

  • COUN 6312 PTSD: CAUSES/PROBLEMS/THERAPY

    COUN 6312 PTSD: Causes, Problems, and Therapy
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6330
    This course focuses on the development and treatment of PTSD, including sources of trauma such as combat stress, severe accidents, sexual assaults, etc. Adjustment problems in the physical, mental, relational and spiritual areas of life will be covered. Various types of therapy for PTSD will be discussed and practiced.

  • COUN 6313 SEXUAL FUNCTNING DYSFUNCTION

    COUN 6313 Sexual Functioning, Dysfunction, and Treatment
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6303
    A comprehensive look at the different sexual disorders. Biological, psychological, and psychosocial factors will be included. Biological and psychological treatments will be covered.

  • COUN 6313 SEXUAL FUNCTNING DYSFUNCTION

    COUN 6313 Sexual Functioning, Dysfunction, and Treatment
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6303
    A comprehensive look at the different sexual disorders. Biological, psychological, and psychosocial factors will be included. Biological and psychological treatments will be covered.

  • COUN 6314 INFIDELITY/SEXUAL TRAUMA/COUNS

    COUN 6314 Infidelity, Sexual Trauma, and Counseling
    Prequisite(s): COUN 6326
    This is an advanced course which discusses counseling issues raised by childhood sexual abuse, sexual assault and trauma, and spousal infidelity, as well as their impact on intimacy and sexual relationships within a marriage. Counseling models and strategies for both perpetrators and survivors are also discussed.

  • COUN 6314 INFIDELITY/SEXUAL TRAUMA/COUNS

    COUN 6314 Infidelity, Sexual Trauma, and Counseling
    Prequisite(s): COUN 6326
    This is an advanced course which discusses counseling issues raised by childhood sexual abuse, sexual assault and trauma, and spousal infidelity, as well as their impact on intimacy and sexual relationships within a marriage. Counseling models and strategies for both perpetrators and survivors are also discussed.

  • COUN 6315 CHRI INTEGRATION SEMINAR II

    COUN 6315 Christian Integration Seminar II
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5315 and at least nine hours completed since successful completion of COUN 5315
    This course is an advanced survey course in the field of Christian Counseling. Students will learn how to apply the prominent theories that form the basis of Christian Counseling and the integration of theology and psychology, as well as develop a working knowledge of the special ethical and cultural considerations unique to the Christian counselor.

  • COUN 6315 CHRI INTEGRATION SEMINAR II

    COUN 6315 Christian Integration Seminar II
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5315 and at least nine hours completed since successful completion of COUN 5315
    This course is an advanced survey course in the field of Christian Counseling. Students will learn how to apply the prominent theories that form the basis of Christian Counseling and the integration of theology and psychology, as well as develop a working knowledge of the special ethical and cultural considerations unique to the Christian counselor.

  • COUN 6316 PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY & ADDICTION

    COUN 6316 Psychopharmacology and Addiction
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines a variety of models for the etiology and treatment of substance use, abuse, and dependency, as well as other addictive disorders using a bio-psycho-social-spiritual perspective. While substance use is emphasized, process and behavioral addictions are also covered, including relapse triggers and prevention. Sprituality is highlighted as a protective factor and part of the overall treatment and recovery process.

  • COUN 6316 PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY & ADDICTION

    COUN 6316 Psychopharmacology and Addiction
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines a variety of models for the etiology and treatment of substance use, abuse, and dependency, as well as other addictive disorders using a bio-psycho-social-spiritual perspective. While substance use is emphasized, process and behavioral addictions are also covered, including relapse triggers and prevention. Sprituality is highlighted as a protective factor and part of the overall treatment and recovery process.

  • COUN 6317 COUNSELING FAMILIES W/ADDICTIO

    COUN 6317 Counseling Families with Addiction
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6311
    This course examines family dynamics that can encourage or sabotage an addict’s recovery. Family-of-origin and other systems theories that impact addiction counseling will be examined. The student will learn about enabling and how to confront it. Counseling techniques will be discussed. Support groups such as Celebrate Recovery or AA’s as an adjunctive to treatment will be covered.

  • COUN 6317 COUNSELING FAMILIES W/ADDICTIO

    COUN 6317 Counseling Families with Addiction
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6311
    This course examines family dynamics that can encourage or sabotage an addict’s recovery. Family-of-origin and other systems theories that impact addiction counseling will be examined. The student will learn about enabling and how to confront it. Counseling techniques will be discussed. Support groups such as Celebrate Recovery or AA’s as an adjunctive to treatment will be covered.

  • COUN 6318 TRNSDSIPLNRY FNDTNS OF ADDICTI

    COUN 6318 Transdisciplinary Foundations of Addiction
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course reflects the SAMHSA guidelines for knowledge, attitudes, and skills required for addictions counselors. Specifically, it targets the transdisciplinary foundations including: Understand Addiction, Treatment Knowledge, Application to Practice, and Professional Readiness.

  • COUN 6318 TRNSDSIPLNRY FNDTNS OF ADDICTI

    COUN 6318 Transdisciplinary Foundations of Addiction
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course reflects the SAMHSA guidelines for knowledge, attitudes, and skills required for addictions counselors. Specifically, it targets the transdisciplinary foundations including: Understand Addiction, Treatment Knowledge, Application to Practice, and Professional Readiness.

  • COUN 6319 RESILIENCE AND COPING

    COUN 6319 Resilience and Coping
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will provide an in-depth review of the literature related to stress and burnout (e.g., life transitions, personal stressors, ongoing stressors), coping, and resilience with a focus on building a repertoire of healthy coping strategies to share as a helping professional. The course also promotes the self-care, coping, and well-being of helping professionals, including an emphasis on healthy relationships, spirituality, and resistance to stress burnout.

  • COUN 6319 RESILIENCE AND COPING

    COUN 6319 Resilience and Coping
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will provide an in-depth review of the literature related to stress and burnout (e.g., life transitions, personal stressors, ongoing stressors), coping, and resilience with a focus on building a repertoire of healthy coping strategies to share as a helping professional. The course also promotes the self-care, coping, and well-being of helping professionals, including an emphasis on healthy relationships, spirituality, and resistance to stress burnout.

  • COUN 6320 RESEARCH DESIGN & PROGRAM EVAL

    COUN 6320 Research Design and Program Evaluation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides an undestanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods and design, statistical analysis, needs assessment, implementation, ethical and cultural considerations in human subject research, and program evaluation relevant to the field of professional counseling and other mental health providers.

  • COUN 6320 RESEARCH DESIGN & PROGRAM EVAL

    COUN 6320 Research Design and Program Evaluation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides an undestanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods and design, statistical analysis, needs assessment, implementation, ethical and cultural considerations in human subject research, and program evaluation relevant to the field of professional counseling and other mental health providers.

  • COUN 6321 CAREER COUNS & LIFESTYLE DEV

    COUN 6321 Career Counseling and Lifestyle Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines major theories and models of career development, lifetyle and vocational assessment, and career counseling. Emphasis is given on methods and processes of collecting, organizing, evaluating, and interpreting educational, occupational, and personal-social information for the purpose of helping others engage in meaningful and satisfying vocations, including spirituality and calling.

  • COUN 6321 CAREER COUNS & LIFESTYLE DEV

    COUN 6321 Career Counseling and Lifestyle Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines major theories and models of career development, lifetyle and vocational assessment, and career counseling. Emphasis is given on methods and processes of collecting, organizing, evaluating, and interpreting educational, occupational, and personal-social information for the purpose of helping others engage in meaningful and satisfying vocations, including spirituality and calling.

  • COUN 6322 MARRIAGE & FAMILY COUNSELING

    COUN 6322 Marriage and Family Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course is an introduction to the field of couple, marriage and family counseling. It will integrate theory and practice in the treatment of dyadic, marital, and familial relationships (including blended families and families with children). Students will develop an understanding of the prominent theories, including emphasis on family systems theories that form the basis for relevant therapeutic approaches.

  • COUN 6322 MARRIAGE & FAMILY COUNSELING

    COUN 6322 Marriage and Family Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course is an introduction to the field of couple, marriage and family counseling. It will integrate theory and practice in the treatment of dyadic, marital, and familial relationships (including blended families and families with children). Students will develop an understanding of the prominent theories, including emphasis on family systems theories that form the basis for relevant therapeutic approaches.

  • COUN 6323 CRISIS RESPONSE & TRAUMA CARE

    COUN 6323 Crisis Response and Trauma Care
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to prepare students to understand the nature of crises, traumatic events, and natural and human disasters, including the efficacy of community-based strategies and psychological first aid. Students will also learn how to work with clients who have experienced trauma and/or interpersonal violence; utilize crisis intervention and suicide prevention strategies; introduce counseling roles and responsibilities as members of an interdisciplinary emergency management response team during local, regional or national crises, disaster or other trauma-causing event; and to address burnout, compassion fatigue, and counselor self-care.

  • COUN 6323 CRISIS RESPONSE & TRAUMA CARE

    COUN 6323 Crisis Response and Trauma Care
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to prepare students to understand the nature of crises, traumatic events, and natural and human disasters, including the efficacy of community-based strategies and psychological first aid. Students will also learn how to work with clients who have experienced trauma and/or interpersonal violence; utilize crisis intervention and suicide prevention strategies; introduce counseling roles and responsibilities as members of an interdisciplinary emergency management response team during local, regional or national crises, disaster or other trauma-causing event; and to address burnout, compassion fatigue, and counselor self-care.

  • COUN 6324 SUBST ABUSE & ADDICT DISORDERS

    COUN 6324 Substance Abuse and Addictive Disorders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines a variety of models for the etiology and treatment of substance use, abuse, and dependency, as well as other addictive disorders using a bio-psycho-social-spiritual perspective. While substance use is emphasized, process and behavioral addictions are also covered, including relapse triggers and prevention. Spirituality is highlighted as a protective factor and part of the overall treatment and recovery process.

  • COUN 6324 SUBST ABUSE & ADDICT DISORDERS

    COUN 6324 Substance Abuse and Addictive Disorders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines a variety of models for the etiology and treatment of substance use, abuse, and dependency, as well as other addictive disorders using a bio-psycho-social-spiritual perspective. While substance use is emphasized, process and behavioral addictions are also covered, including relapse triggers and prevention. Spirituality is highlighted as a protective factor and part of the overall treatment and recovery process.

  • COUN 6325 CLINICAL DIAG & TREATMENT PLAN

    COUN 6325 Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310 and COUN 5316 and COUN 5317 and COUN 5320 and COUN 6309 and COUN 6310 and COUN 6322 and COUN 6323 and COUN 6324 (if required for degree plan)
    This course includes criteria for psychiatric diagnoses, proficiency with the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and theories of psychopathology. The course also provides an introduction to psychopharmacology, including basic neurobiology, pharmacokinetics, assessment, history taking, and drugs as they relate to the treatment of various disorders. Case conceptualization, presentation, and management is incorporated into an intensive supervised counseling experience on campus designed to incorporate role playing and enhance critical treatment planning skills during the residency portion of the class. This course is required by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors (TSBEPC). (This course includes both long distance and residential components.)

  • COUN 6325 CLINICAL DIAG & TREATMENT PLAN

    COUN 6325 Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310 and COUN 5316 and COUN 5317 and COUN 5320 and COUN 6309 and COUN 6310 and COUN 6322 and COUN 6323 and COUN 6324 (if required for degree plan)
    This course includes criteria for psychiatric diagnoses, proficiency with the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and theories of psychopathology. The course also provides an introduction to psychopharmacology, including basic neurobiology, pharmacokinetics, assessment, history taking, and drugs as they relate to the treatment of various disorders. Case conceptualization, presentation, and management is incorporated into an intensive supervised counseling experience on campus designed to incorporate role playing and enhance critical treatment planning skills during the residency portion of the class. This course is required by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors (TSBEPC). (This course includes both long distance and residential components.)

  • COUN 6326 HUMAN SEXUALITY

    COUN 6326 Human Sexuality
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides an introduction to human sexuality and surveys biological, psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual factors and influences. Information about human sexuality across the lifespan is examined, including sexual identity, sexual orientation, and how changing sexual attitudes are influencing the culture. The prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections and diseases is also addressed.

  • COUN 6326 HUMAN SEXUALITY

    COUN 6326 Human Sexuality
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides an introduction to human sexuality and surveys biological, psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual factors and influences. Information about human sexuality across the lifespan is examined, including sexual identity, sexual orientation, and how changing sexual attitudes are influencing the culture. The prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections and diseases is also addressed.

  • COUN 6327 PORNOGRAPHY & SEX ADDICTION

    COUN 6327 Pornography and Sexual Addiction Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course addresses sociocultural, biological, neurobiological, and spiritual factors (e.g., the role of fantasy, lust, and sinful choices) related to the etiology, treatment, and recovery of sexual addiction, including pornography, Internet-based issues, and deviancy.

  • COUN 6327 PORNOGRAPHY & SEX ADDICTION

    COUN 6327 Pornography and Sexual Addiction Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course addresses sociocultural, biological, neurobiological, and spiritual factors (e.g., the role of fantasy, lust, and sinful choices) related to the etiology, treatment, and recovery of sexual addiction, including pornography, Internet-based issues, and deviancy.

  • COUN 6328 PREMARITAL COUN & MARITAL ENRI

    COUN 6328 Premarital Counseling and Marital Enrichment
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6322
    This course provides an in-depth study of premarital/pre-engagement counseling models and assessments, as well as marital enrichment programs and principles. Dating and single adult lifestyle issues are also reviewed.

  • COUN 6328 PREMARITAL COUN & MARITAL ENRI

    COUN 6328 Premarital Counseling and Marital Enrichment
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6322
    This course provides an in-depth study of premarital/pre-engagement counseling models and assessments, as well as marital enrichment programs and principles. Dating and single adult lifestyle issues are also reviewed.

  • COUN 6329 ASSESS/COUN COUPLES & FAMILIES

    COUN 6329 Assessment and Counseling with Couples and Families
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 6322 and COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course examines issues in research and the clinical assessment of couples and families utilizing family systems models and other contemporary approaches. Specific assessment techniques are discussed, evaluated, and practiced, impacting marriage and family structure, psychopathology, communication, decision making, conflict resolution, and spiritual factors.

  • COUN 6329 ASSESS/COUN COUPLES & FAMILIES

    COUN 6329 Assessment and Counseling with Couples and Families
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 6322 and COUN 5320 (if required for degree plan)
    This course examines issues in research and the clinical assessment of couples and families utilizing family systems models and other contemporary approaches. Specific assessment techniques are discussed, evaluated, and practiced, impacting marriage and family structure, psychopathology, communication, decision making, conflict resolution, and spiritual factors.

  • COUN 6330 TRAUMA & CRISIS INTERVENTION

    COUN 6330 Trauma and Crisis Intervention
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to prepare students to understand the nature of crisis, trauma, and disasters, including the appropriateness of diagnosis, to work with clients who have experienced trauma and/or interpersonal violence, to utilize crisis intervention and suicide prevention strategies, to understand psychological first aid, to introduce counselors’ roles and responsibilities as members of an interdisciplinary emergency management response team during a local, regional, or national crisis, disaster or other trauma-causing event, and to address counselor self-care and burnout.

  • COUN 6330 TRAUMA & CRISIS INTERVENTION

    COUN 6330 Trauma and Crisis Intervention
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to prepare students to understand the nature of crisis, trauma, and disasters, including the appropriateness of diagnosis, to work with clients who have experienced trauma and/or interpersonal violence, to utilize crisis intervention and suicide prevention strategies, to understand psychological first aid, to introduce counselors’ roles and responsibilities as members of an interdisciplinary emergency management response team during a local, regional, or national crisis, disaster or other trauma-causing event, and to address counselor self-care and burnout.

  • COUN 6331 GRIEF & LOSS COUNSELING

    COUN 6331 Grief and Loss Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is an introduction to grief and loss work, the dynamics and specific factors related to grief and loss issues across the lifespan, concepts of bereavement and mourning, disenfranchised grief, neurological and sociocultural factors, and the role of faith and spirituality in the counseling process.

  • COUN 6331 GRIEF & LOSS COUNSELING

    COUN 6331 Grief and Loss Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is an introduction to grief and loss work, the dynamics and specific factors related to grief and loss issues across the lifespan, concepts of bereavement and mourning, disenfranchised grief, neurological and sociocultural factors, and the role of faith and spirituality in the counseling process.

  • COUN 6332 LIFE RECOVERY COUNSELING

    COUN 6332 Life Recovery Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines different addiction recovery models, as well as spiritual applications that address concepts such as confession, surrender, forgiveness, meditation, and accountability. The role of relapse prevention is discussed with an emphasis on 12-Step approaches such as alcohholics Anonymous.

  • COUN 6332 LIFE RECOVERY COUNSELING

    COUN 6332 Life Recovery Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines different addiction recovery models, as well as spiritual applications that address concepts such as confession, surrender, forgiveness, meditation, and accountability. The role of relapse prevention is discussed with an emphasis on 12-Step approaches such as alcohholics Anonymous.

  • COUN 6333 COMPLEX TRAUMA/ DISASTER CARE

    COUN 6333 Complex Trauma and Disaster Care
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines traumatic grief and loss events (e.g., violence and abuse, genocide, injury and loss of children, combat, sexual assault, and disasters) and their aftermath (e.g. complicated grief, complex trauma responses, and dissociation). Counseling interventions and strategies include the role of crisis responders, disaster deployment, and the incident command system, as well as psychological and spiritual care.

  • COUN 6333 COMPLEX TRAUMA/ DISASTER CARE

    COUN 6333 Complex Trauma and Disaster Care
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines traumatic grief and loss events (e.g., violence and abuse, genocide, injury and loss of children, combat, sexual assault, and disasters) and their aftermath (e.g. complicated grief, complex trauma responses, and dissociation). Counseling interventions and strategies include the role of crisis responders, disaster deployment, and the incident command system, as well as psychological and spiritual care.

  • COUN 6334 MILITARY RESILIENCE & COPING

    COUN 6334 Military Resilience and Coping
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides an in-depth review of the literature related to stress and burnout within the military culture (e.g. pre- and post-deployment, combat environments, life transitions, personal stressors, and ongoing stressors), coping, and resilience. There is a focus on building a repertoire of healthy coping and bounce back strategies to share as a helping professional.

  • COUN 6334 MILITARY RESILIENCE & COPING

    COUN 6334 Military Resilience and Coping
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides an in-depth review of the literature related to stress and burnout within the military culture (e.g. pre- and post-deployment, combat environments, life transitions, personal stressors, and ongoing stressors), coping, and resilience. There is a focus on building a repertoire of healthy coping and bounce back strategies to share as a helping professional.

  • COUN 6335 MIL. STRESS/PTSD/COMBAT TRAUMA

    COUN 6335 Military Stress, PTSD, Combat Trauma, and Suicide
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6334 and COUN 6336
    This course focuses on combat and military related stress and trauma, as well as the aftermath (e.g. PTSD, traumatic brain injury, addiction, marital and family issues, and suicide.) Specific attention is given to suicide assessment, intervention, and prevention strategies.

  • COUN 6335 MIL. STRESS/PTSD/COMBAT TRAUMA

    COUN 6335 Military Stress, PTSD, Combat Trauma, and Suicide
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6334 and COUN 6336
    This course focuses on combat and military related stress and trauma, as well as the aftermath (e.g. PTSD, traumatic brain injury, addiction, marital and family issues, and suicide.) Specific attention is given to suicide assessment, intervention, and prevention strategies.

  • COUN 6336 CONTEMP ISS/CHALL TODAY’S MILI

    COUN 6336 Contemporary Issues and Challenges in Today’s Military
    Prerequisite(s); None
    This course is an introduction to specific issues that impact the military and veteran population. Students will develop an understanding of military and veteran culture, as well as an introduction to common concerns such as deployment, transition to civilian life, suicide risk, underemployment, and relationships.

  • COUN 6336 CONTEMP ISS/CHALL TODAY’S MILI

    COUN 6336 Contemporary Issues and Challenges in Today’s Military
    Prerequisite(s); None
    This course is an introduction to specific issues that impact the military and veteran population. Students will develop an understanding of military and veteran culture, as well as an introduction to common concerns such as deployment, transition to civilian life, suicide risk, underemployment, and relationships.

  • COUN 6338 PTSD: ETIOLOGY & COUNSELING

    COUN 6338 PTSD: Etiology and Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6323
    This course focuses on the development and treatment of PTSD, including sources of trauma such as violence and abuse, combat stress, severe accidents, sexual assault, and disasters. Adjustment reactions and problems in physical, mental, emotional, relational, and spiritual areas of life are also covered, including various types of therapy for PTSD.

  • COUN 6338 PTSD: ETIOLOGY & COUNSELING

    COUN 6338 PTSD: Etiology and Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6323
    This course focuses on the development and treatment of PTSD, including sources of trauma such as violence and abuse, combat stress, severe accidents, sexual assault, and disasters. Adjustment reactions and problems in physical, mental, emotional, relational, and spiritual areas of life are also covered, including various types of therapy for PTSD.

  • COUN 6339 SEX FUNC: ISSUES AND CHALLENGE

    COUN 6339 Sexual Functioning: Issues, Problems, and Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6326

    This course offers a comprehensive look at various sexual disorders, as well as biological, psychological, physchosocial, and spiritual factors. Biological, psychological, and spiritual interventions and counseling strategies are examined.

  • COUN 6340 MILITARY CAR. & COMMUNI TRANSI

    COUN 6340 Military Career and Community Transition and Reintegration
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6336

    This course examines the two primary transitions of military life: the reintegration challenges that recently deployed military members encounter as they blend back into family, community, church, and a peacetime setting; and the transition from the military to a civilian and career. Counseling strategies and resources will be discussed that help facilitate positive adjustments and support veterans in this transition back into family and community life, as well as new careers.

  • COUN 6341 COUNSEL CHILDREN, ADOLESC & FA

    COUN 6341 Counseling Children, Adolescents and Families
    Prerequisite: None
    This course examines the development of children and adolescents’ developmental and relationship factors that can lead to counseling issues. Techniques and practices for working with children, adolescents, and families are explored. Psychopathology diagnoses are discussed.

  • COUN 6341 COUNSEL CHILDREN, ADOLESC & FA

    COUN 6341 Counseling Children, Adolescents and Families
    Prerequisite: None
    This course examines the development of children and adolescents’ developmental and relationship factors that can lead to counseling issues. Techniques and practices for working with children, adolescents, and families are explored. Psychopathology diagnoses are discussed.

  • COUN 6343 ASSESSMENT IN COUNSELING

    COUN 6343 Assessment in Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6302 and PSYC 6310
    This course is an introduction to psychological testing techniques used in the evaluation of people exhibiting mental, emotional, and/or behavioral disturbances with an emphasis on using assessment therapeutically as part of the treatment process. Instruments related to several subfields are included (e.g., career, personality, behavioral). Report writing skills are addressed.

  • COUN 6343 ASSESSMENT IN COUNSELING

    COUN 6343 Assessment in Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6302 and PSYC 6310
    This course is an introduction to psychological testing techniques used in the evaluation of people exhibiting mental, emotional, and/or behavioral disturbances with an emphasis on using assessment therapeutically as part of the treatment process. Instruments related to several subfields are included (e.g., career, personality, behavioral). Report writing skills are addressed.

  • COUN 6353 ASSESS/TREAT COUPLES/FAMILIES

    COUN 6353 Assessment and Treatment of Couples and Families
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, and PSYC 6301
    This course provides didactic knowledge and in-depth practice and feedback in the major assessments and counseling techniques used with couples and families. Emphasis on assessment and treatment approaches specifically designed for use with a wide range of diverse adult dyads as well as children and adolescents in a family system. Sexual issues, spirituality, and lifespan development are also addressed. Course is offered only in residential format.

  • COUN 6353 ASSESS/TREAT COUPLES/FAMILIES

    COUN 6353 Assessment and Treatment of Couples and Families
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, and PSYC 6301
    This course provides didactic knowledge and in-depth practice and feedback in the major assessments and counseling techniques used with couples and families. Emphasis on assessment and treatment approaches specifically designed for use with a wide range of diverse adult dyads as well as children and adolescents in a family system. Sexual issues, spirituality, and lifespan development are also addressed. Course is offered only in residential format.

  • COUN 6354 PRACTICUM MARRIAGE/FAMILY

    COUN 6354 Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, PSYC 5360, PSYC 6301, PSYC 6302, COUN 6306, COUN 6308, PSYC 6310, and successful completion of Oral Comprehensive Exam.
    Supervised laboratory experiences in counseling with emphasis on developing basic skills in working with couples and families. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. Course is offered only in residential format.

  • COUN 6354 PRACTICUM MARRIAGE/FAMILY

    COUN 6354 Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 5310, COUN 5312, COUN 5313, COUN 5323, PSYC 5360, PSYC 6301, PSYC 6302, COUN 6306, COUN 6308, PSYC 6310, and successful completion of Oral Comprehensive Exam.
    Supervised laboratory experiences in counseling with emphasis on developing basic skills in working with couples and families. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. Course is offered only in residential format.

  • COUN 6355 ADV PRACTICUM MARRIAGE FAMILY

    COUN 6355 Advanced Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6354
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis in developing competence in counseling with couples and families. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. May be repeated for credit.

  • COUN 6355 ADV PRACTICUM MARRIAGE FAMILY

    COUN 6355 Advanced Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6354
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis in developing competence in counseling with couples and families. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities. Continued communication with on-campus supervisor through class activities and consultation. May be repeated for credit.

  • COUN 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    COUN 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • COUN 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    COUN 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • COUN 6391 COUNSELING PRACTICUM

    COUN 6391 Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310 and COUN 5316 and COUN 5317 and COUN 5318 and COUN 5320 and COUN 6310 (if required for degree plan)
    This course represents an initial field experience in professional practice and provides for the application of theory and ongoing development of basic counseling skills in various mental health settings under direct supervision. Students will work with clients who represent the ethnic and demographic diversity of their community and complete a supervised counseling practicum experience that totals a minimum of 100 clock hours (40 direct service hours) with actual clients.

  • COUN 6391 COUNSELING PRACTICUM

    COUN 6391 Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310 and COUN 5316 and COUN 5317 and COUN 5318 and COUN 5320 and COUN 6310 (if required for degree plan)
    This course represents an initial field experience in professional practice and provides for the application of theory and ongoing development of basic counseling skills in various mental health settings under direct supervision. Students will work with clients who represent the ethnic and demographic diversity of their community and complete a supervised counseling practicum experience that totals a minimum of 100 clock hours (40 direct service hours) with actual clients.

  • COUN 6392 COUNSELING INTERNSHIP I

    COUN 6392 Counseling Internship I
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310 and COUN 5316 and COUN 5317 and COUN 5318 and COUN 5320 and COUN 6309 and COUN 6310 and COUN 6325 and COUN 6391 (if required for degree plan)
    This course provides an opportunity for ongoing field experiences in professional clinical practice and in the application of counseling theory and the development of advanced counseling skills under direct supervision. These experiences allow students to counsel and provide services to clients who represent the ethnic and demographic diversity of their community. Students complete 300 clock hours (120 direct service hours) of supervised counseling internship in roles and settings with clients relevant to their specialty area. By taking this course and COUN 6393, students will gain a total of 600 clock hours with 240 direct service hours.

  • COUN 6392 COUNSELING INTERNSHIP I

    COUN 6392 Counseling Internship I
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 5309 and COUN 5310 and COUN 5316 and COUN 5317 and COUN 5318 and COUN 5320 and COUN 6309 and COUN 6310 and COUN 6325 and COUN 6391 (if required for degree plan)
    This course provides an opportunity for ongoing field experiences in professional clinical practice and in the application of counseling theory and the development of advanced counseling skills under direct supervision. These experiences allow students to counsel and provide services to clients who represent the ethnic and demographic diversity of their community. Students complete 300 clock hours (120 direct service hours) of supervised counseling internship in roles and settings with clients relevant to their specialty area. By taking this course and COUN 6393, students will gain a total of 600 clock hours with 240 direct service hours.

  • COUN 6393 COUNSELING INTERNSHIP II

    COUN 6393 Counseling Internship II
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6392
    This course provides an opportunity for ongoing field experiences in professional clinical practice and in the application of counseling theory and the development of advanced counseling skills under direct supervision. These experiences allow students to counsel and provide services to clients who represent the ethnic and demographic diversity of their community. Students complete 300 clock hours (120 direct service hours) of supervised counseling internship in roles and settings with clients relevant to their specialty area. By taking this course and COUN 6392, students will gain a total of 600 clock hours with 240 direct service hours.

  • COUN 6393 COUNSELING INTERNSHIP II

    COUN 6393 Counseling Internship II
    Prerequisite(s): COUN 6392
    This course provides an opportunity for ongoing field experiences in professional clinical practice and in the application of counseling theory and the development of advanced counseling skills under direct supervision. These experiences allow students to counsel and provide services to clients who represent the ethnic and demographic diversity of their community. Students complete 300 clock hours (120 direct service hours) of supervised counseling internship in roles and settings with clients relevant to their specialty area. By taking this course and COUN 6392, students will gain a total of 600 clock hours with 240 direct service hours.

  • CYEN 3331 COMPUTER NETWORK SECURITY

    CYEN 3331 Computer Network Security
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 2351
    Overview of computer network security, broad coverage of cyber security concepts, computer network defense, computer network attack, and wireless security.

  • CYEN 4331 DIGITAL FORENSICS CYBER CRIME

    CYEN 4331 Digital Forensics and Cyber Crime
    Prerequisite(s): CYEN 3331
    An overview of forensics including methods to uncover and exploit digital evidence; cyber crime, forensics analysis techniques.

  • CYEN 4332 WIRELESS AND MOBILE SECURITY

    CYEN 4332 Wireless and Mobile Security
    Prerequisite(s): CYEN 3331
    Overview of wireless and mobile security providing students with practical and theoretical experiences. Topics include threat analysis, security infrastructure, security services, wireless network security components.

  • CYEN 4333 REVERSE ENGINEERING

    CYEN 4333 Reverse Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): CYEN 3331
    Overview of reverse engineering techniques, modern tools for reverse engineering of machine code. Topics include gathering information, PE32 format, obfuscation techniques, memory dumping, and automating processes.

  • CYEN 4335 APPLIED CRYPTOGRAPHY

    CYEN 4335 Applied Cryptography
    Prerequisite(s): CYEN 3331
    An introduction to the basic theory and practice of cryptographic techniques used in computer security. Topics include encryption, key management, hashing, network security protocols.

  • CYEN 4337 SECURITY OPERATIONS

    CYEN 4337 Security Operations
    Prerequisite(s): CYEN 3331
    Overview of security assessment, network operations, and security protocols.

  • CYEN 4351 SOFTWARE DESIGN & ENGINEERING

    CYEN 4351 Software Design and Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 2351
    Design, construction and maintenance of large software systems. Project planning, requirements analysis, software design methodologies, software implementation and testing, maintenance.

  • CYEN 4352 DISTRIBUTED & CLOUD COMPUTING

    CYEN 4352 Distributed and Cloud Computing
    Prerequisite(s): COSC 4351
    Overview of distributed computing. Theoretical and applicable aspects of distributed systems and cloud computing. Modeling aspects including architecture, performance, reliability, availability, service models, security characteristics.

  • CYEN 4371 ACCESS CNTRL LOGIC COVRT CHNLS

    CYEN 4371 Access Control Logic and Covert Channels
    Prerequisite(s): CYEN 2351 and MATH 3311
    An overview of access control logic and covert channels. Topics include access control concepts and logic, covert channel detection, future security predictions, steganography, steganalysis, data hiding.

  • CYEN 4381 DATA ANALYTICS

    CYEN 4381 Data Analytics
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
    Introduction to data analytics; key tools and concepts from the functional, technical, and implementation perspective of using data analytics to solve real world challenges.

  • CYEN 4391 BLOCKCHAIN

    CYEN 4391 Blockchain
    Prerequisite(s): None
    the course covers all aspects of cryptocurrencies, including distributed consensus, blockchains, smart contracts and applications; focusing on Bitcoin and Ethereum as case studies. Prior background in Python within a Unix environment is recommended, but no previous Bitcoin knowledge is necessary.

  • ECON 2311 MICROECONOMICS

    ECON 2311 Microeconomics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to microeconomic theory with emphasis on the determination of price and output in the competitive and noncompetitive market structures of American capitalism. Includes applications of price theory to a range of economic issues.

  • ECON 2312 MACROECONOMICS

    ECON 2312 Macroeconomics
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 2311
    An introduction to macroeconomic theory including supply and demand analysis, national income accounting, monetary theory and policy, modern employment theory, and applications of theory to policy.

  • ECON 3303 MACROECONOMIC THRY:INTERMED

    ECON 3303 Macroeconomic Theory Intermediate
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 2312
    An intensive study of the assumptions and concepts which are basic to the theories of income determination and aggregate employment.

  • ECON 3304 MICROECONOMIC THEORY INTERMED

    ECON 3304 Microeconomic Theory Intermediate
    Prerequisite)s: ECON 2311 and (BUSA 2301 or MATH 1451 or a higher mathematics course)
    An intensive examination of the assumptions and forces which underlie the price system.

  • ECON 3315 SECURITY MARKETS AND FINANCIAL

    ECON 3315 Security Markets and Financial Institutions
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 3320
    An introduction to the US financial system. Topics include interest rate theory, financial markets such as money markets and capital markets including stock and bond markets, and financial institutions such as banks and other depository institutions, finance companies, insurance companies, investment companies, pension funds, securities firms. (Offered also as FINA 3315.)

  • ECON 3330 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

    ECON 3330 International Finance
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 3320 and ECON 2311
    A study of the theories and practices of international trade and finance, direction and composition of world trade, institutions for facilitating trade, international payments, capital movement, exchange rates. (Offered also as FINA 3330.)

  • ECON 4312 GLOBAL ECONOMY

    ECON 4312 Global Economy
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 2311 and ECON 2312
    This course examines international trade beginning with an evaluation of the gains of trade, types of restrictions on free trade and their impacts, and policies regarding trade. The effects of the movement of resources across national boundaries are also examined. The discussion of international monetary theory includes balance of payments and the functions and impacts of the foreign-exchange markets. The course is structured around case studies that require the student to analyze and apply knowledge gained from the course.

  • ECON 4330 SEMINAR ON LAW AND ECONOMICS

    ECON 4330 Seminar on Law and Economics
    Prerequisite(s): BUSA 2320 and ECON 2311
    This course will provide an analytical framework for studying the relationship between the environment and economic and political systems. Students will cover cost/benefit analysis and economic issues concerning valuation, and then apply the theory to current legislation, case law, and state and federal statutes dealing with air and pollution, waste management, wildlife management, and resource management.

  • ECON 4335 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

    ECON 4335 History of Economic Thought
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 2311 and ECON 2312
    A survey of major contributors to economic thought from Adam Smith to Milton Friedman in modern times with emphasis on their impact on contemporary economic thought and analysis. Research papers will be required on selected topics in economic history.

  • ECON 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ECON 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ECON 5260 ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES

    ECON 5260 Economic Principles
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey course of microeconomic theory combined with an introduction to key macroeconomic concepts. Microeconomic theory will include supply and demand analysis, with emphasis on the determination of price and output in the competitive and noncompetitive market structures of American capitalism. Macroeconomic theory will include gross domestic product, employment, inflation, and business cycles. Graduate Business Programs only.

  • ECON 5363 ECONOMICS PRINCIPLES

    ECON 5363 Economics Principles
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey course of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory. Microeconomic theory will include supply and demand analysis, with emphasis on the determination of price and output in the competitive and noncompetitive market structures of American capitalism. A study of the macroeconomic theory will include application of economic principles relating to the behavior of aggregate economic activity and the price level. Topics include aggregate economic variables and their measurement, economic growth, economic fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, government deficits, monetary policy, and fiscal policy.

  • ECON 6330 GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

    ECON 6330 Global Political Economy
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 5363
    This course examines the interaction of politics and the economy at the global level. In particular, it evaluates how political and economic decisions of one country or groups of countries affect institutions and life circumstances in others and assesses the causes and consequences of globalization as rooted in political economy. Key topics include major conceptual frameworks for understanding the linkages between international politics and international economics, international monetary and financial relations, international trade, foreign investment and multinational enterprises, key international economic institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, World Trade Organization, and World Bank, the rise of the BRIC economics and the shift of global balance, and global economic governance. Graduate Business programs only.

  • ECON 6353 GLOBAL ECONOMY/INSTITUTIONS

    ECON 6353 Global Economy and Institutions
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 5363
    This course provides an overview of global economies, institutions and how macroeconomic factors impact different economies. This will impact the way business leaders manage risks that globalization entails. The course goes beyond the theory and includes a discussion of current global economic events drawing on articles from current publications. Graduate Business programs only.

  • ECON 6365 ENTREPRENEURIAL PERSPECTIVES

    ECON 6365 Entrepreneurial Perspectives on Economics and Free Enterprise
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course focuses on the core principles of economics, with an emphasis on the specific terminology, models, and concepts describing the micro-economic entity of the firm. It will also integrate the core tenets that drive the American market system of free enterprise. Topics will include: a) producer supply, buyer demand, and the four market structures of monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition, and commodity-based perfect competition; b) marginal analysis of revenue, costs, profits, and productivity; and c) integrating pricing, revenue, and margins into decision making for the emerging entrepreneurial venture.

  • ECON 6365 ENTREPRENEURIAL PERSPECTIVES

    ECON 6365 Entrepreneurial Perspectives on Economics and Free Enterprise
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course focuses on the core principles of economics, with an emphasis on the specific terminology, models, and concepts describing the micro-economic entity of the firm. It will also integrate the core tenets that drive the American market system of free enterprise. Topics will include: a) producer supply, buyer demand, and the four market structures of monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition, and commodity-based perfect competition; b) marginal analysis of revenue, costs, profits, and productivity; and c) integrating pricing, revenue, and margins into decision making for the emerging entrepreneurial venture.

  • EDAD 5320 SYSTEMS THINK:THEORY/APPL

    EDAD 5320 Systems Thinking: Theory and Application
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This class will provide an overview, background, and foundation in systems theory and performance technology. This focus will assist in developing a vision of teaching and learning with technology as a major component. Topics covered include performance technology, general systems theory, needs assessment, and change management. A class project, including a needs assessment and final report of potential solutions, is required of all students.

  • EDAD 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDAD 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDAD 6181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDAD 6181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDAD 6191 INTERNSHIP IN PRINCIPALSHIP I

    EDAD 6191 Internship in the Principalship I
    Prerequisite(s): 24 credit hours in Educational Administration
    This course is a two semester internship designed to provide field experiences in school leadership at the campus level with emphasis on public relations, personnel administration, pupil behavior and discipline, curriculum development, instructional leadership, and facilities management. The candidate is assigned to work with a certified campus leader for a minimum of 160 clock hours in the field in the time period of over two semesters. In the overall two-semester experience, the candidate is given experiences in applying management fundamentals to an on-going school program. Each of the topics in the contract and syllabus is developed by assignments, discussions, required reading, and reports. The curricula for this course includes (1) knowledge of the literature of the discipline and (2) ongoing student engagement in research related to professional practice.

  • EDAD 6192 SEMINAR EDUCATIONAL LEADRSHIP

    EDAD 6192 Seminar in Educational Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to help students prepare for the Texas Examination of Educator Standards (TExES) for state principal certification. The course will focus on content and sample questions from the authorized preparation manual for the state principal examination distributed by the National Evaluation Systems, Inc. Information will also be utilized from the state publication Proficiencies for Leaders in Learner-Centered Schools and other appropriate sources. Students must score a minimum of 80% on the TExES practice tests in order to be authorized by the College of Education to take the state TExES examination.

  • EDAD 6193 INTERNSHIP IN PRINCIPALSHIP II

    EDAD 6193 Internship in the Principalship II
    Prerequisite(s): 24 credit hours in Educational Administration
    This course is a two semester internship designed to provide field experiences in school leadership at the campus level with emphasis on public relations, personnel administration, pupil behavior and discipline, curriculum development, instructional leadership, and facilities management. The candidate is assigned to work with a certified campus leader for a minimum of 160 clock hours in the field in the time period of over two semesters. In the overall two-semester experience, the candidate is given experiences in applying management fundamentals to an on-going school program. Each of the topics in the contract and syllabus is developed by assignments, discussions, required reading, and reports. The curricula for this course includes (1) knowledge of the literature of the discipline and (2) ongoing student engagement in research related to professional practice.

  • EDAD 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDAD 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDAD 6291 INTERNSHIP: PRINCPALSHIP

    EDAD 6291 Internship in the Principalship
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least 24 credit hours in EDAD course work
    This course provides for administrative internship at the home campus of the student with the supervision of a campus-based administrator and a university supervisor.

  • EDAD 6292 INTERNSHIP: PRINCIPALSHIP

    EDAD 6292 Internship in the Principalship
    Prerequisite(s): EDAD 6291 and completion of at least 24 credit hours in EDAD course work
    This is the second course in the Internship and is recommended for the summer term. The student shadows an administrator in a summer school session. The internship is scheduled in a district other than the employing district of the student.

  • EDAD 6301 ADMIN THEORY/ PRACTICE

    EDAD 6301 Administrative Theory and Practice
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores theory and practices related to organizational behavior, development, models, and change; shared decision-making; and instructional leadership. Major topics include the new roles of school leaders, issues related to school reform, community and stakeholder involvement, improvement of the teaching and learning environment, enhancing student achievement, and ethics.

  • EDAD 6302 INSTRUCT LEADERSHIP/EVAL

    EDAD 6302 Instructional Leadership and Evaluation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will study major issues, problems, and trends in Instructional Leadership. An analysis of leadership skills required of the principal in the areas of curriculum, supervision, group processes, organization for school improvement, and staff development will be emphasized. Each candidate will receive certification in Advancing Educational Leadership (AEL) and Teacher Appraisal Training (T-TESS) upon completion of the Texas approved training.

  • EDAD 6303 SCHOOL LAW

    EDAD 6303 School Law
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores legal and ethical issues that arise in elementary and secondary schools. It provides school leaders with the knowledge necessary to understand and prevent legal problems, and helps school leaders think through questions of educational policy and ethics that legal disputes raise but do not resolve. Topics include liability for student injury, due process, search and seizure, staff appraisal, employment discrimination, church/state conflicts, control over the curriculum, the expression of controversial views, legal and ethical issues related to the financing and adequacy of state school finance plans, and the schools’ authority to make rules governing student and teacher conduct. The course also reviews federal, state and local policies related to equal opportunity, including: school accountability, bilingual education, sexual discrimination and harassment, privacy issues, affirmative action, and the education of exceptional children.

  • EDAD 6304 SCHL BUSINESS MGMT/FINANCE

    EDAD 6304 School Business Management and Finance
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Study of roles, responsibilities, systems, and procedures in school business matters. Includes budgeting, accounting, data processing, purchasing, personnel, and management of facilities, equipment, and real property. Examination of federal, state, and local programs to finance education.

  • EDAD 6307 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    EDAD 6307 Classroom Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of a broad spectrum of approaches to classroom management, including authoritarian, behavior-modification, group-process, instructional, and psycho-emotional-climate orientations. Examination of research regarding effective classroom management. Exploration of multiple strategies for handling common classroom management problems. (Offered also as EDUC 6301.)

  • EDAD 6308 ROLE:PRINCIPAL

    EDAD 6308 The Role of the Principal
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Study of the roles and responsibilities in the administration of elementary, middle, and secondary schools, with focus on the principal’s professional relations with teachers, parents, pupils, educational leaders within the district, and the board of education. Analysis of the role of the principal in curriculum development, organization, and evaluation; school organization; discipline; student behavior; community relations; the teaching/learning process; in-service training; and leadership in teacher growth and evaluation. Emphasis is on the personal qualities of leadership conducive to good human relations.

  • EDAD 6309 THE SCHOOL/ INSTRUCT PROG

    EDAD 6309 The School and Its Instructional Program
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Factors influencing school curriculum in grades K-12 are studied. Included are the components of the curriculum: organization of the curriculum; how curriculum is changed; how new curriculum is developed; and the curriculum programs in elementary and secondary schools.

  • EDAD 6310 APPL: EDUCATIONAL RES

    EDAD 6310 Applications of Educational Research
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of investigations relating to educational research. Includes examination of reports from abstracts and original sources, valid research criteria in making written evaluations, and applications in specific field settings. (Offered also as EDUC 6320 and PSYC 6320.)

  • EDAD 6311 LEADSHP INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    EDAD 6311 Leadership for Inclusive Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is an in-depth analysis and discussion of the school leader’s role in creating and sustaining an inclusive learning environment for all. Candidates will examine diversity through the lens of race/ethnicity, language, economics, and academics. They will also explore the role of the campus leader in the administration and support of special elementary and secondary school programs including Career Technology Education (CTE), special education, compensatory, bilingual, English Language Learners (ELL), and gifted and talented education.

  • EDAD 6312 INTERPERSONAL COMM & PR

    EDAD 6312 Interpersonal Communication and Public Relations
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course addresses the requisite knowledge, performances, and dispositions necessary for a school leader to collaborate with families and community members, respond to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilize community resources. Candidates study the meaning of collaborative leadership and the actions necessary to build working alliances. Much attention is focused on the strategies needed to connect across multiple and diverse community boundaries. Candidates also become familiar with an emergent body of research regarding school, family, and community collaboration around schooling issues. In addition, candidates explore the interpersonal communication skills in order to become effective communicators of the campus vision and mission.

  • EDAD 6313 SCHL PERSONNEL LEADERSHIP

    EDAD 6313 School Personnel Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An integration of personnel leadership skills required in the legal, academic, and administrative considerations of regular and special school programs. Included are state and federal regulations.

  • EDAD 6316 DATA-DRIVEN DECISION MAKING

    EDAD 6316 Data-Driven Decision Making
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course enables school leaders to enhance their understanding of how consistent and systemic use of data shifts school cultures toward learner-centered communities that recognize achievement gaps in learning among student populations. Through the analysis of data, candidates learn a process for collaboratively inquiring with school faculty to identify significant student learning problems, design research-based intervention strategies, and monitor effectiveness, which contribute to building school capacity and instructional expertise. Through data-driven dialogue, candidates practice and learn facilitation strategies to establish high performing teams and enhance personal accountability. Candidates explore achievement gaps related to minority and special populations and recognize how their personal belief systems and expectations may impact schooling practices. A focus on literacy or math content will enable candidates to frame a context in which to explore issues related to diverse learners and equitable practice.

  • EDAD 6317 HUMAN CAPITAL/DEVELOPMENT

    EDAD 6317 Human Capital and Professional Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course studies the practices and principles of school leadership with reference to recruitment, selection and promotion, and retention of school personnel. Topics include planning for personnel needs, job analysis and evaluation, job descriptions, salaries, maintenance of morale, evaluation of personnel, and other employee services. This course includes fundamental issues related to the development of personnel, entry-level knowledge of staff appraisal, adult learning and development, and professional development.

  • EDAD 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDAD 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDBI 3335 SPANISH WRITING WORKSHOP

    EDBI 3335 Spanish Writing Workshop
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides students with strategies to write fluently in Spanish. Techniques emphasize the steps of the writing process. Students use self-editing and peer collaboration to produce a portfolio of their work. (Offered also as SPAN 3335.)

  • EDBI 3381 INDEPENDENT STUDY/SPEC TOPIC

    EDBI 3381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDBI 3387 TCH SCHL CONTENT:BIL CLASSRM

    EDBI 3387 Teaching School Content Areas in the Bilingual Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 4301 or EDUC 4311
    This course will include the preparation and teaching of lessons and units in Spanish for content area; Spanish vocabulary development and instruction including the multifaceted knowledge of word knowledge; appropriate strategies for before, during and after reading; the role of fluency in comprehension and strategies to improve fluency; evaluation of curriculum materials for the Spanish speaker; familiarization with the state adopted materials written in Spanish; assessment that leads to data informed decisions; comprehension skills in content areas; grouping procedures in a multi-tiered approach; and lesson design that differentiates based on student need. Students apply course content in a field-based practicum in a bilingual classroom.

  • EDBI 4304 METH:TCH ENGL:SECOND LANG

    EDBI 4304 Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and (EDUC 4301 or EDUC 4311)
    This course will enable students to explore theories, pedagogical considerations and current methodology in the teaching of reading, speaking, listening, thinking and writing visualizing, and visually representing for second languages and targeted cultures. The five critical components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics and word study, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) will frame the study of learners of second languages. An emphasis will be placed on developing interpersonal communication skills of the beginning and intermediate ESL students.

  • EDBI 4305 SECOND LANG ACQUISITION

    EDBI 4305 Second Language Acquisition
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program
    This course will introduce students to theories of second language acquisition; comparison of first and second language acquisition; second language acquisition in children and adults and in the bilingual child. Also included in this course is an introduction to sociolinguistic considerations and assessment of language dominance and proficiency to inform instructional decisions. This course will make use of a multi-tiered system of support to provide the necessary differentiation. Student learning will focus on acquisition of English as a second language.

  • EDBI 4307 FOUND:TCH ESL&BIL EDUC

    EDBI 4307 Foundations of ESL and Bilingual Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Survey of the historical, theoretical, and policy foundations of programs which serve English language learners (ELL’s); types of programs; research findings related to these programs; and factors in creating an effective multicultural environment for addressing students’ affective, linguistic, and cognitive needs.

  • EDBI 4350 DEVELOP LITERACY:BIL CLASSRM

    EDBI 4350 Developing Literacy in the Bilingual Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and (EDUC 4301 or EDUC 4311)
    This course will include an analysis of the development of reading, speaking, listening, thinking and writing visualizing, and visually representing as it applies to the young bilingual child. The five critical components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics and word study, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) will frame the study of the bilingual learner. The course will also include a theoretical framework for literacy development in the first language of bilingual students using a multi-tiered approach to classroom instruction that involves being able to gather assessment data that will inform instructional decisions and differentiate instruction. This course will also include an exploration of the selection and development of activities that promote literacy acquisition in the first language of bilingual students. This class will be taught primarily in Spanish.

  • EDBI 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDBI 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDBI 5304 METH:TCH ENGL:SEC LANG

    EDBI 5304 Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will help to prepare learners to function as knowledgeable and effective teachers/scholars of students in a bilingual/ESL classroom. Students will conduct an in-depth study of theories, pedagogical considerations and current methodology in the teaching of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills for second languages and target cultures. Emphasis is on developing interpersonal communication skills of beginning and intermediate ESL students.

  • EDBI 5305 SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

    EDBI 5305 Second Language Acquisition
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will prepare professional educators to function as knowledgeable and effective teachers/scholars of students in a bilingual classroom. Students will explore theories of second language acquisition, comparison of first and second language acquisition, and second language acquisition in children and adults and in the bilingual child. Students will conduct an in-depth study of assessment of language dominance and proficiency with a focus on acquisition of English as a second language.

  • EDBI 5315 INTEGRATE ESL/CONT AREAS

    EDBI 5315 Integrating ESL with the Content Areas
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Approaches to teaching English as a Second Language within the context of comprehensible content-area instruction. Sheltered English. Emphasis on developing literacy skills and fostering oral and written student interaction in all subject areas. Understanding of cultural diversity and its implications to classroom climate. Adapting instruction to the diagnosed needs of the LEP student. Fifteen-hour school-based practicum project.

  • EDBI 5335 SPANISH WRITING WORKSHOP

    EDBI 5335 Spanish Writing Workshop
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will provide students with techniques for developing writing skills in Spanish. This includes knowledge of Spanish language orthography, as well as the use of suitable writing styles for a given audience. Knowledge and skills developed in the class will be relevant to the teaching of writing in the EC-6 Bilingual/ESL classroom and to the Bilingual Target Language Proficiency Test (BTLPT). This course will be conducted in Spanish.

  • EDBI 5343 HISPANIC CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

    EDBI 5343 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the major cultural aspects of Spanish-speaking countries, with a special emphasis on literature, art, history, geography and cultural patterns. This course will be taught in Spanish. Not open to students with language proficiency below ACTFL Intermediate High.

  • EDBI 5344 HISPANIC CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

    EDBI 5344 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the major cultural aspects of Spanish-speaking countries, with a special emphasis on literature, art, history, geography and cultural patterns. This course will be taught in Spanish. Not open to students with language proficiency below ACTFL Intermediate High.

  • EDBI 5350 DEVELOP LITERACY:BIL CLASSRM

    EDBI 5350 Developing Literacy in the Bilingual Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will prepare professional educators to function as knowledgeable and effective teachers/scholars of students in a bilingual classroom. Students will gain an in-depth understanding the theoretical framework for the literacy development in the first language of bilingual students. Students will explore and analyze current methods of teaching reading and writing. Students will develop and evaluate activities that promote literacy acquisition in the first language of bilingual students. This class will be taught primarily in Spanish.

  • EDBI 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDBI 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDBI 6181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDBI 6181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDBI 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDBI 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDBI 6305 FOUND:BILINGUAL EDUC

    EDBI 6305 Foundations of Bilingual Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Rationale for bilingual education. Goals, curriculum, classroom management, and testing in the various types of bilingual programs. Research findings in bilingual education.

  • EDBI 6307 TCH MATH/SCI/SS:BIL CLASSRM

    EDBI 6307 The Teaching of Mathematics, Science and Social Studies in the Bilingual Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Development, utilization, and adaptation of resources and materials for teaching math, science and social studies in the bilingual classroom. Current approaches to teaching the content areas in the bilingual classroom. Vocabulary and fluency development in content areas in Spanish. Program and staffing models. Use of the first and second languages. This course will be taught primarily in Spanish.

  • EDBI 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDBI 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDEC 2320 LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

    EDEC 2320 Learning and Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This is a comprehensive study of child and adolescent development (cognitive, social, physical, and emotional development) combined with examination and analysis of learning theory and other factors and principles that affect learning. Observation and experience in schools is included. (Offered also as EDUC 2320.)

  • EDEC 2320 LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

    EDEC 2320 Learning and Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This is a comprehensive study of child and adolescent development (cognitive, social, physical, and emotional development) combined with examination and analysis of learning theory and other factors and principles that affect learning. Observation and experience in schools is included. (Offered also as EDUC 2320.)

  • EDEC 4160 WELLNESS/FITNESS FOR CHILDREN

    EDEC 4160 Wellness & Fitness for Children
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course prepares students to effectively teach health and P.E. in grades PK-6. In addition to PK-6 health content and methodology, it includes exploration of developmentally appropriate movement education methods for PK through grade 6 as well as ways to use movement activities to help children learn academic content areas other than health and P.E. (such as math, science, social studies and language arts). (Offered also as INDC 4160.)

  • EDEC 4160 WELLNESS/FITNESS FOR CHILDREN

    EDEC 4160 Wellness & Fitness for Children
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course prepares students to effectively teach health and P.E. in grades PK-6. In addition to PK-6 health content and methodology, it includes exploration of developmentally appropriate movement education methods for PK through grade 6 as well as ways to use movement activities to help children learn academic content areas other than health and P.E. (such as math, science, social studies and language arts). (Offered also as INDC 4160.)

  • EDEC 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDEC 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be include

  • EDEC 4281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDEC 4281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDEC 4290 EARLY CHILDHOOD PRACTICUM

    EDEC 4290 Early Childhood Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): EDEC 4304 and EDEC 4306 and EDEC 4313 and EDEC 4330 and EDEC 4351
    This is a field-based course in which students are placed in a pre-school situation for observation and application of concepts learned in course work.

  • EDEC 4304 THE YOUNG CHILD

    EDEC 4304 The Young Child
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course includes an in-depth study of growth and development during infancy and early childhood. The behavioral science foundations of early childhood education are studied in this course.

  • EDEC 4304 THE YOUNG CHILD

    EDEC 4304 The Young Child
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course includes an in-depth study of growth and development during infancy and early childhood. The behavioral science foundations of early childhood education are studied in this course.

  • EDEC 4313 C&I, EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

    EDEC 4313 Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Education
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and (EDUC 4301 or EDUC 4311)
    This course is focused on the study of research-based curriculum, instruction, and assessment for early childhood. All areas of study are focused on developmentally appropriate practices for children of preschool and kindergarten age and are supported by national standards and state standards-National Association for the Education of the Young Child (NAEYC), Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) and guidelines. Topics include learning about the specific characteristics and expectations for this age group, becoming knowledgeable of early childhood programs, planning learning activities and facilities, developing positive school/home relations, being aware of the diverse needs of the learner, and other aspects of creating and maintaining rich learning experiences.

  • EDEC 4330 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING

    EDEC 4330 Psychology of Learning
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course stressing the contributions of major learning theories to understanding behavior. Particular attention is paid to human learning and the applicability of learning theory to the educational process as well as to goal attainments. (Offered also as PSYC 4351.)

  • EDEC 4330 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING

    EDEC 4330 Psychology of Learning
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course stressing the contributions of major learning theories to understanding behavior. Particular attention is paid to human learning and the applicability of learning theory to the educational process as well as to goal attainments. (Offered also as PSYC 4351.)

  • EDEC 4351 EMERGENT LITERACY

    EDEC 4351 Emergent Literacy
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course includes an analysis of the development of reading, speaking, listening, thinking and writing, visualizing, and visually representing as it applies to the young child. The five critical components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics and the word study, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) frame the study of the emergent learner. The course also includes a multi-tiered approach to classroom instruction: being able to differentiate instruction as needed and gather assessment data that will inform instructional decisions. (Offered also as EDRE 4351.)

  • EDEC 4351 EMERGENT LITERACY

    EDEC 4351 Emergent Literacy
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course includes an analysis of the development of reading, speaking, listening, thinking and writing, visualizing, and visually representing as it applies to the young child. The five critical components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics and the word study, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) frame the study of the emergent learner. The course also includes a multi-tiered approach to classroom instruction: being able to differentiate instruction as needed and gather assessment data that will inform instructional decisions. (Offered also as EDRE 4351.)

  • EDEC 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDEC 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDEC 4385 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF FINE ART

    EDEC 4385 Essential Elements of Fine Art
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores EC-6 fine arts content and methodology. It includes development of knowledge, skills and dispositions identified in the art, music and theatre Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) as well as ways to integrate fine arts into learning in other content areas. (Offered also as INDC 4385.)

  • EDEC 4385 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF FINE ART

    EDEC 4385 Essential Elements of Fine Art
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores EC-6 fine arts content and methodology. It includes development of knowledge, skills and dispositions identified in the art, music and theatre Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) as well as ways to integrate fine arts into learning in other content areas. (Offered also as INDC 4385.)

  • EDEC 5181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDEC 5181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDEC 5281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDEC 5281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDEC 5310 PRESCHOOL C&I

    EDEC 5310 Preschool Curriculum and Instruction
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of developmentally appropriate curriculum and instruction for three and four year old children. Fieldwork is required.

  • EDEC 5311 KINDERGARTEN C&I

    EDEC 5311 Kindergarten Curriculum and Instruction
    Prerequisite(s): EDEC 5306
    This course includes the study of and experiences with instructional strategies; planning and evaluation of learning activities; selection and planning of physical facilities; and the skills necessary for management of kindergarten programs.

  • EDEC 5351 EMERGENT LITERACY

    EDEC 5351 Emergent Literacy
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program
    In this course students examine emergent literacy and explore ways to encourage the development of initial literacy. A wide variety of topics pertaining to the emergent reader and writer are included. (Offered also as EDRE 5351 and EDSP 5351.)

  • EDEC 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDEC 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDEC 6181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDEC 6181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDEC 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDEC 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDEC 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDEC 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDLD 7200 SEM DOC STUDIES EXEC ED LDSHP

    EDLD 7200 Seminar for Doctoral Studies in Executive Educational Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides an overview of current issues in education which may be topics of interest to doctoral candidates and information regarding areas of study and research related to the doctoral program.

  • EDLD 7301 CULTURAL COMPETENCE ED LEADRS

    EDLD 7301 Cultural Competence for Educational Leaders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Content in the course includes the political, economic, and cultural factors affecting schools, institutions of higher education, and educational leadership today. Life styles, values and aspirations of various cultural groups as related to the leadership process are also covered. In addition, conflict management processes and skills with emphasis on interaction patterns, interpersonal relationships, and communication skills are addressed.

  • EDLD 7301 CULTURAL COMPETENCE ED LEADRS

    EDLD 7301 Cultural Competence for Educational Leaders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Content in the course includes the political, economic, and cultural factors affecting schools, institutions of higher education, and educational leadership today. Life styles, values and aspirations of various cultural groups as related to the leadership process are also covered. In addition, conflict management processes and skills with emphasis on interaction patterns, interpersonal relationships, and communication skills are addressed.

  • EDLD 7302 LEADSHP THEORY & APPLICATIONS

    EDLD 7302 Leadership Theory and Applications
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Leadership theories, models and processes with emphasis on the results of the applications of various theories, models, and processes to educational leadership are addressed in this course. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLD 7302 LEADSHP THEORY & APPLICATIONS

    EDLD 7302 Leadership Theory and Applications
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Leadership theories, models and processes with emphasis on the results of the applications of various theories, models, and processes to educational leadership are addressed in this course. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLD 7303 RETHINKING ED W/EMERGING TECH

    EDLD 7303 Rethinking Education with Emerging Technologies
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course content addresses emerging technologies as tools to enhance learning in and out of the classroom. In this course, theories, instructional design, assessment, and digital teaching platforms are emphasized. No specialized technology expertise is required.

  • EDLD 7303 RETHINKING ED W/EMERGING TECH

    EDLD 7303 Rethinking Education with Emerging Technologies
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course content addresses emerging technologies as tools to enhance learning in and out of the classroom. In this course, theories, instructional design, assessment, and digital teaching platforms are emphasized. No specialized technology expertise is required.

  • EDLD 7304 ORGANIZATNAL BEHAVIOR & THEORY

    EDLD 7304 Organizational Behavior and Theory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The study of organizational theory and behavior is built upon contributions from a number of behavioral disciplines such as: psychology, sociology, social psychology, anthropology, and political science. Contributions of the psychologists have been mainly at the individual or micro level, while the latter disciplines have contributed to our understanding of macro concepts – group processes and organization. The course addresses the integration and application of behavioral knowledge to guide the behavior of others in the educational work place. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLD 7304 ORGANIZATNAL BEHAVIOR & THEORY

    EDLD 7304 Organizational Behavior and Theory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The study of organizational theory and behavior is built upon contributions from a number of behavioral disciplines such as: psychology, sociology, social psychology, anthropology, and political science. Contributions of the psychologists have been mainly at the individual or micro level, while the latter disciplines have contributed to our understanding of macro concepts – group processes and organization. The course addresses the integration and application of behavioral knowledge to guide the behavior of others in the educational work place. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLD 7305 INSTCT THEORY & SCHL EFFECTVNS

    EDLD 7305 Instructional Theory and School Effectiveness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Systematic study is made of existing research on key factors influencing instructional effectiveness and on models for school restructuring. The relationship of instruction and school effectiveness is explored in depth. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLD 7305 INSTCT THEORY & SCHL EFFECTVNS

    EDLD 7305 Instructional Theory and School Effectiveness
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Systematic study is made of existing research on key factors influencing instructional effectiveness and on models for school restructuring. The relationship of instruction and school effectiveness is explored in depth. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLD 7307 CHRISTIAN WORLDVIEW ED LEADERS

    EDLD 7307 Christian World View for Educational Leaders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course will examine the roles of leadership in community, administration and schools from a Christian worldview. The course curriculum emphasizes the knowledge necessary to assess and apply biblically informed leadership skills in school settings.

  • EDLD 7307 CHRISTIAN WORLDVIEW ED LEADERS

    EDLD 7307 Christian World View for Educational Leaders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course will examine the roles of leadership in community, administration and schools from a Christian worldview. The course curriculum emphasizes the knowledge necessary to assess and apply biblically informed leadership skills in school settings.

  • EDLD 7308 ETHICAL LEADESHIP & GOVERNANCE

    EDLD 7308 Ethical Leadership and Governance
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course will explore ethics, values, and diversity, with an emphasis on building the knowledge and skills necessary for effective leadership within the educational setting. Current theory, best practices, and opportunities for practical application are integrated. Particular emphasis is given to leadership behavior theory and ethical practice that has emerged in the field of educational administration/leadership.

  • EDLD 7308 ETHICAL LEADESHIP & GOVERNANCE

    EDLD 7308 Ethical Leadership and Governance
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course will explore ethics, values, and diversity, with an emphasis on building the knowledge and skills necessary for effective leadership within the educational setting. Current theory, best practices, and opportunities for practical application are integrated. Particular emphasis is given to leadership behavior theory and ethical practice that has emerged in the field of educational administration/leadership.

  • EDLR 7116 DISSERTATION RESEARCH I

    EDLR 7116 Dissertation Research I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In consultation with the professor of record for the course and dissertation chair, the student will continue to develop chapter I and begin to develop chapter II of the dissertation to complete the aims identified by the dissertation chair and the student.

  • EDLR 7117 DISSERTATION RESEARCH II

    EDLR 7217 Dissertation Research II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In consultation with the professor of record for the course and dissertation chair, the student will complete the design of chapters II and III of the dissertation and defend chapters I, II, and III in the proposal defense during spring, summer I, summer II, and fall semesters. In addition, the student will rite proposals for presentations at professional conferences and review and correct the case study developed in semester two of the program to prepare for publication.

  • EDLR 7118 DISSERTATION RESEARCH III

    EDLR 7218 Dissertation Research III
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In consultation with the professor of record for the course and dissertation chair, the student will design and conduct research to complete the aims identified in his/her research proposal to write chapter IV and begin the development of chapter V of the dissertation. In addition, the student will review the questions and processes for the written and oral exams, review and correct the case study developed in semester two of the program to prepare for publication, write proposals for presentations at professional conferences, and write manuscripts for publication.

  • EDLR 7119 DISSERTATION RESEARCH IV

    EDLR 7119 Dissertation Research IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In consultation with the professor of record for the course and dissertation chair, the student will design and conduct research to complete the aims identified in chapters I-IV to complete chapter V and defend the final dissertation. In addition, the student will review the questions and processes for the written and oral exams; review and correct the case study developed in semester two of the program to prepare for publication; write proposals for presentations at professional conferences; and write manuscripts for publication.

  • EDLR 7120 DISSERTATION RESEARCH V

    EDLR 7120 Dissertation Research V
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The student must remain continuously enrolled in the program unit all courses and the dissertation are completed. In consultation with the professor of record for the course and dissertation chair, the student will design and conduct research to complete the aims identified in chapters I-IV to complete chapter V and defend the final dissertation.

  • EDLR 7216 DISSERTATION RESEARCH I

    EDLR 7216 Dissertation Research I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In consultation with the mentor and advisory committee, the student will design and conduct research to complete the aims identified in his/her research proposal or as modified subsequently in line with recommendations from the committee.

  • EDLR 7216 DISSERTATION RESEARCH I

    EDLR 7216 Dissertation Research I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In consultation with the mentor and advisory committee, the student will design and conduct research to complete the aims identified in his/her research proposal or as modified subsequently in line with recommendations from the committee.

  • EDLR 7217 DISSERTATION RESEARCH II

    EDLR 7217 Dissertation Research II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In consultation with the mentor and advisory committee, the student will design and conduct research to complete the aims identified in his/her research proposal or as modified subsequently in line with recommendations from the committee.

  • EDLR 7217 DISSERTATION RESEARCH II

    EDLR 7217 Dissertation Research II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In consultation with the mentor and advisory committee, the student will design and conduct research to complete the aims identified in his/her research proposal or as modified subsequently in line with recommendations from the committee.

  • EDLR 7218 DISSERTATION RESEARCH III

    EDLR 7218 Dissertation Research III
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In consultation with the professor of record for the course and dissertation chair, the student will design and conduct research to complete the aims identified in his/her research proposal to write chapter IV and begin the development of chapter V of the dissertation. In addition, the student will review the questions and processes for the written and oral exams, review and correct the case study developed in semester two of the program to prepare for publication, write proposals for presentations at professional conferences, and write manuscripts for publication.

  • EDLR 7310 ACCNTBLTY & MEASUREMENT ED

    EDLR 7310 Accountability and Measurement for Current Issues in Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course is designed for the study of educational problem solving and accountability and their relationship to needs assessment techniques, evaluation methodologies, and decision-making processes.

  • EDLR 7310 ACCNTBLTY & MEASUREMENT ED

    EDLR 7310 Accountability and Measurement for Current Issues in Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course is designed for the study of educational problem solving and accountability and their relationship to needs assessment techniques, evaluation methodologies, and decision-making processes.

  • EDLR 7311 MTHDS QUANTITATIVE ED RESEARCH

    EDLR 7311 Methods of Quantitative Educational Research
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course is a study of quantitative research with emphasis upon an understanding of statistical concepts and procedures necessary to create and implement effective educational research. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLR 7311 MTHDS QUANTITATIVE ED RESEARCH

    EDLR 7311 Methods of Quantitative Educational Research
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course is a study of quantitative research with emphasis upon an understanding of statistical concepts and procedures necessary to create and implement effective educational research. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLR 7312 QUALITATIVE RESRCH METHODOLOGY

    EDLR 7312 Qualitative Research Methodology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course is designed to teach qualitative research methodology within an educational leadership problems-based contextual framework. The course will emphasize qualitative research techniques through lecture, discussion, readings, and field-based research projects using the methods learned. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLR 7312 QUALITATIVE RESRCH METHODOLOGY

    EDLR 7312 Qualitative Research Methodology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course is designed to teach qualitative research methodology within an educational leadership problems-based contextual framework. The course will emphasize qualitative research techniques through lecture, discussion, readings, and field-based research projects using the methods learned. The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLR 7313 APPLIED MULTIVARIATE STATISTIC

    EDLR 7313 Applied Multivariate Statistics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course examines the assumptions, limitations, and uses of basic techniques such as cluster analysis, principal components analysis, and factor analysis. The concepts will be applied to real data sets using programs such as R, SAS, and SPSS.

  • EDLR 7313 APPLIED MULTIVARIATE STATISTIC

    EDLR 7313 Applied Multivariate Statistics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course examines the assumptions, limitations, and uses of basic techniques such as cluster analysis, principal components analysis, and factor analysis. The concepts will be applied to real data sets using programs such as R, SAS, and SPSS.

  • EDLR 7323 APPLIED RESEARCH IN EDUCATION

    EDLR 7323 Applied Research in Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Fundamental concepts and tools of research applied to educational problems. Each candidate will prepare a proposal for the dissertation (chapters 1-3). The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDLR 7323 APPLIED RESEARCH IN EDUCATION

    EDLR 7323 Applied Research in Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Fundamental concepts and tools of research applied to educational problems. Each candidate will prepare a proposal for the dissertation (chapters 1-3). The course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing candidate engagement in research.

  • EDRE 4320 TCH READ:CHILDREN LIT

    EDRE 4320 Teaching Reading through Children’s Literature
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Educator Preparation Program
    Students in this course will be introduced to the best examples in literature for children. The student will gain an in-depth knowledge of the major genres of children’s literature, how to critically evaluate books using specific criteria, and how to make use of that knowledge in extending pupil skills in developmental reading as well as the creation of lifetime reading habits. Students also become familiar with the lives and works of major authors and illustrators of works for children.

  • EDRE 4330 TCH CONTENT AREA READING

    EDRE 4330 Teaching Content Area Reading Skills
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program
    Students in this course will explore methods for teaching reading in the content areas. Topics will include assessment that leads to data informed decisions; comprehension skills in content areas; readability and material suitability; study skills; vocabulary development and instruction, the multifaceted knowledge of word knowledge; appropriate strategies for before, during and after reading; the role of fluency in comprehension and strategies to improve fluency, reading efficiency; grouping procedures in a multi-tiered approach; and lesson design that differentiates based on student need.

  • EDRE 4350 READING:LANGUAGE ARTS

    EDRE 4350 Reading and the Language Arts
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 4301 or EDUC 4311
    Corequisite(s): EDRE 4360

    This course includes an analysis of the development of writing and spelling for grades 2-8 and the use of differentiated instruction. The use of assessment and data driven decision making for instruction are covered. The style of instruction will focus on effective teaching: (1) Explicit instruction with modeling, (2) Systematic instruction and scaffolding, (3) Multiple opportunities for independent practice and application, (4) Immediate affirmative & corrective feedback, and (5) On-going progress monitoring and a multi-tiered system of support. Both on-campus and field experiences are included. It must be completed before clinical teaching.

  • EDRE 4351 EMERGENT LITERACY

    EDRE 4351 Emergent Literacy
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Educator Preparation Program
    This course includes an analysis of the development of reading, speaking, listening, thinking and writing visualizing, and visually representing as it applies to the young child. The five critical components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics and word study, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) frame the study of the emergent learner. The course also includes a multi-tiered approach to classroom instruction: being able to differentiate instruction as needed and gather assessment data that will inform instructional decisions.

  • EDRE 4360 DEVELOPING/TEACHING LITERACY

    EDRE 4360 Developing and Teaching Literacy
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program
    Corequisite(s): EDRE 4350

    Included in this course are methods and materials for teaching developmental reading to children in school settings from grades Pre-K to 8. The course emphasizes competence in assessing specific strengths and weaknesses in the reading skills of children, differentiation in instruction, lesson planning in order to prepare learning activities appropriate to children’s needs, and interaction with children in such a way that learning is maximized. It includes a multi-tiered approach to meet the various needs of students along with assessment that drives instructional decisions. It builds on the concepts from emergent literacy (EDRE 4351) that stress the five critical components of reading instruction and the understanding of effective instruction (five features). Both on-campus activities and field experiences are included. This course must be completed before student teaching.

  • EDRE 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDRE 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDRE 5181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDRE 5181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDRE 5182 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDRE 5181 Special Topics/Independent Study¿
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDRE 5301 ADV DEVELOPMENTAL READ

    EDRE 5301 Advanced Developmental Reading
    Prerequisite: None
    This course examines developmental reading programs for grades pre-school through college. Skill in recognizing various stages in the development of reading processes and an analysis of the total reading program, emphasizing procedures for improvement, is developed.

  • EDRE 5304 DIAG/CORRECTION: READ DIFF

    EDRE 5304 Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Causes of reading difficulties along with the use of diagnostic evaluation to select appropriate instructional materials and strategies for correction are explored.

  • EDRE 5310 READING & WRITING: PRE-ADOLES

    EDRE 5310 Reading & Writing for Pre-Adolescents
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Included in this course are methods and materials for teaching developmental reading to children in elementary school settings. The course emphasizes competence in assessing specific strengths and weaknesses in the reading skills of children, lesson planning in order to prepare learning activities appropriate to children’s needs, and interacting with children in such a way that learning is maximized. Both on-campus activities and field experiences are included. This course is a prerequisite for student teaching.

  • EDRE 5320 TCH:READ:CHILD LIT

    EDRE 5320 Teaching Reading through Children’s Literature
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will enable professional educators to construct and evaluate reading programs at all levels. Graduate students taking this course will gain an in-depth knowledge of the major genres of children’s literature and how to critically evaluate books using specific criteria. The course will provide educators with the skills and experience necessary to enrich their reading instruction, as well as the creation of lifetime reading habits. Students will explore the lives and works of major authors and illustrators of works for children and their impact on this area of reading education, as well as exploring the use of multicultural literature.

  • EDRE 5330 CONTENT AREA READING

    EDRE 5330 Content Area Reading
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will introduce professional educators (and those seeking initial certification) to specific methods for teaching reading in content areas. Students will study assessment procedures, comprehension skills in content areas, readability and materials suitability, study skills, vocabulary development, developing reading rate flexibility, reading efficiency, grouping procedures, and lesson design. Using these experiences, students will learn to write formal lesson plans or prepare units of study for content areas that incorporate reading instruction. Students will learn to evaluate the effectiveness of reading strategies and how to make improvements.

  • EDRE 5352 LITERACY:SECONDARY SCH

    EDRE 5352 Literacy in the Secondary Schools
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides students with opportunities to use literacy as a tool to meet a broad range of personal, social, and curricular functions as well as real-world applications. It stresses comprehension strategies, metacognition, reflection and positive attitudes toward literacy.

  • EDRE 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDRE 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDRE 6181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDRE 6181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDRE 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDRE 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDRE 6305 READ:LINGUISTIC PERSPECTIVE

    EDRE 6305 Reading: A Linguistic Perspective
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines reading within the framework of literacy development. Linguistic and psychological perspectives toward reading as well as their relationship to the comprehensive process are emphasized.

  • EDRE 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDRE 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDSP 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDSP 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDSP 4281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDSP 4281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDSP 4302 SURVEY: EXCEPTIONAL CHILD

    EDSP 4302 Survey of Exceptional Children
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program
    This course provides a survey of populations with exceptionalities. Cognitive, emotional, social, physical, and motivational characteristics as well as educational needs of children with exceptionalities are explored. Knowledge of professional, ethical and legal issues that apply to working with students with exceptionalities is also included. Students apply current and new knowledge regarding instructional planning, assessment and collaboration.

  • EDSP 4311 DIAG/PRESCRIPTIVE TCH:EXC CHLD

    EDSP 4311 Diagnostic and Prescriptive Teaching for Exceptional Children
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and EDSP 4302
    This course focuses on the diagnostic-prescriptive approach to individualizing instruction which provides educators with a comprehensive method of assessing learning styles, identifying where breakdowns occur in the learning process, and developing appropriate programming related to the specific needs of learners. Key topics include response to intervention (RTI) approaches, the screening process for dyslexia, standardized and informal assessments, and data analysis as well as laws related to eligibility, ethics and parents’ rights. Students learn to write Individualized Educational Programs (IEPs) based on the diagnostic-prescriptive approach to individualizing instruction for students with exceptionalities. Further, interviews of experienced educators will be conducted regarding current issues and practices in assessment and intervention.

  • EDSP 4319 TCH STRATEGIES:SP EDUC

    EDSP 4319 Teaching Strategies in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and EDSP 4302
    All learners possess unique characteristics, interests, and abilities. Special educators are responsible for connecting instructional planning to learner strengths and needs with typical and atypical exceptionalities. In this course, the educator examines research based instructional strategies to ensure student success across the curriculum, according to human growth and development. An investigation of characteristics associated with cross categorical learners, as defined by the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act (IDEA, 2004), and how they affect teaching and learning will also be covered. Further, educational implications for students with exceptionalities will also be addressed. The course also explores research-based practices and subject area instructional strategies that result in accommodations and modifications for students with exceptionalities; including the five components mandated by the State Board for Educator Certification in the screening process for Dyslexia. Also included is the importance of effective and positive collaborative relationships with all stakeholders to support development and educational progress. The educator also applies knowledge of characteristics of students with learning disabilities and how knowledge of professional, ethical, and legal issues applies to working with students. In addition, opportunities are presented in which the teaching professional applies current and new knowledge regarding instructional planning, assessment, and collaboration.

  • EDSP 4325 EDUCATING GIFTED LEARNERS

    EDSP 4325 Educating Gifted Learners
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 4301 or EDUC 4311
    This course presents an overview of the intellectual and developmental characteristics of the gifted and talented as well as an introduction to identification techniques, instructional approaches, educational programs, and special problems. The course focuses on classroom educational practices designed to meet the unique needs of the gifted and talented students. Historical, legal, and conceptual foundations of gifted education are examined as well as current research relevant to the education of gifted learners.

  • EDSP 4352 BEHAVIOR AND CLASSROOM MGMT

    EDSP 4352 Behavior and Classroom Management
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and EDSP 4302
    Promoting positive behavior and effectively responding to misbehavior are critical skills necessary for all educators. This course helps educators create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character, in order to optimize learning for all students. Age-appropriate skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible grouping structures and for teaching conflict resolution will be presented. Through this course, the educator will also learn the ABC’s of behavior, function, and effective strategies for implementing a behavior intervention plan (BIP) for students that exhibit behavior deficits. The course also provides strategies for building positive relationships, fostering motivation, and engaging in effective communication and problem solving with parents and families.

  • EDSP 4353 FIELD EXP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

    EDSP 4353 Field Experiences in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Education Program and EDSP 4302 and EDSP 4311 and EDSP 4319 and EDSP 4352
    Students will become knowledgeable about various methods of special service delivery to students with exceptionalities as they come in contact with a continuum of service delivery systems ranging from least restrictive (inclusive) to most restrictive (self-contained) environments. Observations, classroom assistance, instructional planning, classroom and individual instruction, and conference activities will be required. Students will create a Teacher Work Sample (TWS), which consists of a project demonstrating mastery of the components of effective instruction and student learning. Successful completion of the TWS is required for program completion.

  • EDSP 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDSP 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDSP 5302 SURVEY: EXCEPTIONAL CHILD

    EDSP 5302 Survey of Exceptional Children
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program
    Students will determine the goals of instruction according to the needs of the various exceptionalities; they will develop an appropriate curriculum using the essential elements as a base. Students will learn the techniques of managing behavior, how to individualize instruction, how to apply methods of intervention, and how to evaluate adequacy of teaching. The future educator will learn how to arrange classrooms specific to management theories. Students must be computer literate. Fieldwork is required.

  • EDSP 5311 DIAG/PRESCRIPTIVE TCH:EXC

    EDSP 5311 Diagnostic and Prescriptive Teaching for Exceptional Children
    Prerequisite(s): EDSP 5302
    The learning experiences in this course will contribute to the knowledge and skills of professional educators in developing and assessing programs for students who exhibit learning and behavior difficulties. Students will learn the diagnostic-prescriptive approach to individualized instruction. Students in the course will learn about comprehensive methods of assessing learning styles and to identify where the breakdowns can occur in the learning process. This course will assist educators in developing, administering and evaluating appropriate programming related to specific needs of learners. The screening process for dyslexia mandated by the State Board for Educator Certification is taught in this course.

  • EDSP 5319 TCH STRATEGIES:SP EDUC

    EDSP 5319 Teaching Strategies in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): EDSP 5302 and EDSP 5311
    This course is designed to enable students to develop the expertise of the professional educator with the needs of the various student exceptionalities. Teachers seeking certification as Educational Diagnosticians will learn to apply specialized techniques of managing behavior, how to individualize instruction, how to apply methods of intervention, and how to evaluate adequacy of teaching. The practicing educator taking this course will be able to develop a comprehensive knowledge about classroom management theories as they relate to special education.

  • EDSP 5325 EDUCATING GIFTED LEARNERS

    EDSP 5325 Educating Gifted Learners
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course presents an overview of the intellectual and developmental characteristics of the gifted and talented as well as an introduction to identification techniques, instructional approaches, educational programs, and special problems. The course focuses on classroom educational practices designed to meet the unique needs of the gifted and talented students. Historical, legal, and conceptual foundations of gifted education are examined as well as current research relevant to the education of gifted learners.

  • EDSP 5335 IDEN/EVAL IN EARLY CHILD

    EDSP 5335 Identification, and Evaluation in Early Childhood
    Prerequisite(s): EDSP 5302 and EDSP 5311
    This course involves an in-depth study of growth and development of the young child during infancy and early childhood. Additionally, this course emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and identification of exceptionalities. It will include observations, screen, and assessment of young children, report writing, and identifying appropriate evidence-based interventions.

  • EDSP 5345 STUDENT EVAL TECHNIQUES

    EDSP 5345 Student Evaluation Techniques
    Prerequisite(s): Teaching experience and/or a course in instructional design, i.e. EDUC 6302 or EDUC 6312)
    This course is designed to enable the student to improve the design, construction, and validation of teacher-made tests, and to evaluate, select, administer, and interpret standardized tests for all levels of instruction. Also included is brief attention to the organization and management of schools and legal and ethical aspects of teaching. (Offered also as EDAD 5345 and EDUC 5345.)

  • EDSP 5351 EMERGENT LITERACY

    EDSP 5351 Emergent Literacy
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 5313 or 6302 (or teacher certification)
    In this course students examine emergent literacy and explore ways to encourage the development of initial literacy. A wide variety of topics pertaining to the emergent reader and writer are included. (Offered also as EDEC 5351 and EDRE 5351.)

  • EDSP 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDSP 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDSP 6181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDSP 6181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDSP 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDSP 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDSP 6305 INDIV PSYCHOLOGICAL EVAL

    EDSP 6305 Individual Psychological Evaluation
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 6304
    Review of theory underlying individual ability tests, supervised practice in test administration, scoring, and interpretation. Skills in report preparation are addressed. The Wechsler scales are emphasized. (Offered also as EPSY 6305 and PSYC 6305.)

  • EDSP 6315 PRACTICUM IN DIAGNOSIS

    EDSP 6315 Practicum in Diagnosis
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 6305
    Each student works under the supervision of a certified Educational Diagnostician five days a week during regular school hours for the length of the term that the course is offered at the university.

  • EDSP 6344 EDC APPRAISE:INDIV EXCEPTIONAL

    EDSP 6344 Educational Appraisal of Individuals with Exceptionalities
    Prerequisite(s): EDSP 5302 and EDSP 5311 and EDSP 5319 and EDSP 5335
    This course is an introduction to appraisal techniques and instruments used to identify the presence or absence of a specific disability. Administration, scoring, interpretation, preparation of written reports and the development of IEPs will be taught in this course. Students must be computer literate. (Offered also as EPSY 6344.)

  • EDSP 6345 ADV ASSESS:SPEC EDUC

    EDSP 6345 Advanced Assessment in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): EDSP 5302 and EDSP 5311 and EDSP 5319 and EDSP 5335 and EDSP 6305 and EDSP 6344
    This course addresses the explosion of information related to assessment in special education and to the diverse populations served by special education. It examines advanced assessment techniques currently used by educational diagnosticians. The course will focus on developing proficiency in the administration and interpretation of instruments such as the following: The Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, the KABC, the Wechsler Achievement Test, the Bender Gestalt, the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence, the Woodcock Johnson Cognitive Battery, the UNIT, the KABC, Adaptive Behavior Scales, and the Vineland Social Maturity Scales. Students must be computer literate.

  • EDSP 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDSP 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDSP 7321 LEGAL ISSUES POLICIES SPCL ED

    EDSP 7321 Legal Issues and Policies in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course examines the tension between competing philosophical theories and the construction and function of educational policy and key legal issues that govern daily and long-range decisions of special education leaders. Contemporary debates in special education policy, law, and ethical issues will be explored, and the development of educational policy and the initiation and impact that influences educational institutions are examined.

  • EDSP 7321 LEGAL ISSUES POLICIES SPCL ED

    EDSP 7321 Legal Issues and Policies in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course examines the tension between competing philosophical theories and the construction and function of educational policy and key legal issues that govern daily and long-range decisions of special education leaders. Contemporary debates in special education policy, law, and ethical issues will be explored, and the development of educational policy and the initiation and impact that influences educational institutions are examined.

  • EDSP 7322 DISTRICT COMMUNITY RELATIONS

    EDSP 7322 District and Community Relations for Special Education Leaders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The seminar course focuses on systems for developing school-community relations and an understanding of the school district’s purposes, functions, achievements as related to the needs of stakeholders involved with special education initiatives. Best practices and relevant research involving the communication of student data and achievement results is addressed.

  • EDSP 7322 DISTRICT COMMUNITY RELATIONS

    EDSP 7322 District and Community Relations for Special Education Leaders
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The seminar course focuses on systems for developing school-community relations and an understanding of the school district’s purposes, functions, achievements as related to the needs of stakeholders involved with special education initiatives. Best practices and relevant research involving the communication of student data and achievement results is addressed.

  • EDSP 7323 PERSONNEL PREP COLLABORATION

    EDSP 7323 Personnel Preparation and Collaboration in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course focuses on the special education leader’s role in recruiting and retaining adequate, well prepared staff trained to meet the education needs of students with individual differences. Such topics as recruitment, salary policy, tenure, leaves, contractual obligations, education, training, and academic freedom are considered.

  • EDSP 7323 PERSONNEL PREP COLLABORATION

    EDSP 7323 Personnel Preparation and Collaboration in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course focuses on the special education leader’s role in recruiting and retaining adequate, well prepared staff trained to meet the education needs of students with individual differences. Such topics as recruitment, salary policy, tenure, leaves, contractual obligations, education, training, and academic freedom are considered.

  • EDSP 7324 INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES

    EDSP 7324 Instructional Practices in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course guides special education professionals through the process of identifying, selecting, implementing, and evaluating evidence-based practices, including procedures for scenarios when the research is insufficient. Functional and curriculum based assessment is addressed.

  • EDSP 7324 INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES

    EDSP 7324 Instructional Practices in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course guides special education professionals through the process of identifying, selecting, implementing, and evaluating evidence-based practices, including procedures for scenarios when the research is insufficient. Functional and curriculum based assessment is addressed.

  • EDSP 7325 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SPEC ED

    EDSP 7325 Field Experience in Special Education Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 hours from EDLD 7200 or EDLD 7301 or EDLD 7302 or EDLD 7303 or EDLD 7304 or EDLD 7307 or EDLD 7308 or EDPS 7324
    Candidates participate and are evaluated in an intensive study and field experience relating to positions in special education leadership. Candidates will write a manuscript for publication or for a presentation at a professional conference.

  • EDSP 7325 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SPEC ED

    EDSP 7325 Field Experience in Special Education Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 hours from EDLD 7200 or EDLD 7301 or EDLD 7302 or EDLD 7303 or EDLD 7304 or EDLD 7307 or EDLD 7308 or EDPS 7324
    Candidates participate and are evaluated in an intensive study and field experience relating to positions in special education leadership. Candidates will write a manuscript for publication or for a presentation at a professional conference.

  • EDSU 7303 PUBLIC POLICY IN EDUCATION

    EDSU 7303 Public Policy in Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the context for policy making and the process of policy development and implementation. It includes the study of organizational structures for educational decision-making at the federal, state, county, and local levels, with emphasis on how and where influence can be exerted.

  • EDSU 7303 PUBLIC POLICY IN EDUCATION

    EDSU 7303 Public Policy in Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the context for policy making and the process of policy development and implementation. It includes the study of organizational structures for educational decision-making at the federal, state, county, and local levels, with emphasis on how and where influence can be exerted.

  • EDSU 7306 FIELD EXPERIENCE EXEC ED LEAD

    EDSU 7306 Field Experience in Executive Educational Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 hours of leadership core
    Candidates participate and are evaluated in an intensive study and field experience relating to positions in educational leadership. Candidates will write a manuscript for publication or for a presentation at a professional conference.

  • EDSU 7306 FIELD EXPERIENCE EXEC ED LEAD

    EDSU 7306 Field Experience in Executive Educational Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 hours of leadership core
    Candidates participate and are evaluated in an intensive study and field experience relating to positions in educational leadership. Candidates will write a manuscript for publication or for a presentation at a professional conference.

  • EDSU 7308 FINA PRINCIPLES & PRACTICE

    EDSU 7308 Finance Principles and Practice for Christian School Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course covers finance and funds development principles and models as well as major trends and issues in the study of resource acquisition and use in Christian schools and auxiliary enterprises.

  • EDSU 7308 FINA PRINCIPLES & PRACTICE

    EDSU 7308 Finance Principles and Practice for Christian School Leadership
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course covers finance and funds development principles and models as well as major trends and issues in the study of resource acquisition and use in Christian schools and auxiliary enterprises.

  • EDSU 7309 EDUCATIONAL LAW & POLICY

    EDSU 7309 Educational Law & Policy
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course examines the tension between competing philosophical theories and the construction and function of educational policy and key legal issues that govern daily and long-range decisions of educational leaders. Contemporary debates in educational policy, law, and ethical issues will be explored and the development of educational policy and the initiation and impact that influences educational institutions will be examined.

  • EDSU 7309 EDUCATIONAL LAW & POLICY

    EDSU 7309 Educational Law & Policy
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course examines the tension between competing philosophical theories and the construction and function of educational policy and key legal issues that govern daily and long-range decisions of educational leaders. Contemporary debates in educational policy, law, and ethical issues will be explored and the development of educational policy and the initiation and impact that influences educational institutions will be examined.

  • EDSU 7310 PROGRAM EVALUATION

    EDSU 7310 Program Evaluation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Essentials of policy and program evaluations focuses on establishing whether a particular program, regulation, or policy is achieving its intended outcome by investigating whether it has had a verifiable causal effect on intended (and unintended) outcomes. The coursework covers the use of effective evaluation procedures and applications that will allow educational leaders to become knowledgeable consumers. The course presents a variety of methods and applications that are included in the repertoire of educational personnel who successfully evaluate school programs and policies.

  • EDSU 7310 PROGRAM EVALUATION

    EDSU 7310 Program Evaluation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Essentials of policy and program evaluations focuses on establishing whether a particular program, regulation, or policy is achieving its intended outcome by investigating whether it has had a verifiable causal effect on intended (and unintended) outcomes. The coursework covers the use of effective evaluation procedures and applications that will allow educational leaders to become knowledgeable consumers. The course presents a variety of methods and applications that are included in the repertoire of educational personnel who successfully evaluate school programs and policies.

  • EDSU 7320 DISTRICT & COMMUNITY RELATIONS

    EDSU 7320 District and Community Relations
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course focuses on systems for developing school-community relations and an understanding of the school district’s purposes, functions, achievements as related to the needs of all stakeholders. Best practices and relevant research involving the communication of student achievement data, systems management by effectively using media such as websites, newsletters, and local news agencies will be explored.

  • EDSU 7320 DISTRICT & COMMUNITY RELATIONS

    EDSU 7320 District and Community Relations
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course focuses on systems for developing school-community relations and an understanding of the school district’s purposes, functions, achievements as related to the needs of all stakeholders. Best practices and relevant research involving the communication of student achievement data, systems management by effectively using media such as websites, newsletters, and local news agencies will be explored.

  • EDSU 7321 DISTRCT FINA PLANT PLAN & MGMT

    EDSU 7321 District Finance, Plant Planning and Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course is designed for school superintendents, business managers, and other school personnel whose responsibilities include school plant planning and management. Topics considered include how to use and maintain present school plants, keeping the school board and community informed as to building needs, selecting architects, and financing construction, and the developing educational specifications. It will also cover the roles, responsibilities, systems and procedures in school district business matters including budgeting, accounting, data processing, purchasing, personnel, and how bond packages are created for rapid district growth needs.

  • EDSU 7321 DISTRCT FINA PLANT PLAN & MGMT

    EDSU 7321 District Finance, Plant Planning and Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course is designed for school superintendents, business managers, and other school personnel whose responsibilities include school plant planning and management. Topics considered include how to use and maintain present school plants, keeping the school board and community informed as to building needs, selecting architects, and financing construction, and the developing educational specifications. It will also cover the roles, responsibilities, systems and procedures in school district business matters including budgeting, accounting, data processing, purchasing, personnel, and how bond packages are created for rapid district growth needs.

  • EDSU 7322 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    EDSU 7322 Human Resource Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course focuses on the administrator’s role in recruiting and retaining adequate staff. Such topics as recruitment, salary policy, tenure, leaves, contractual obligations, and academic freedom are considered.

  • EDSU 7322 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    EDSU 7322 Human Resource Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course focuses on the administrator’s role in recruiting and retaining adequate staff. Such topics as recruitment, salary policy, tenure, leaves, contractual obligations, and academic freedom are considered.

  • EDUC 2320 LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

    EDUC 2320 Learning and Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This is a comprehensive study of child and adolescent development (cognitive, social, physical, and emotional development) combined with examination and analysis of learning theory and other factors and principles that affect learning. Observation and experience in schools is included. (Students who wish to enter the Educator Preparation Program must earn a C or better in this course.)

  • EDUC 2330 FOUNDATIONS:AMER EDUC THOUGHT

    EDUC 2330 Foundations of American Educational Thought
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course of study introduces the historical, philosophical, and sociological influences that have shaped the dynamic nature of private and public educational systems in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the Christian influence on education, great educational leaders, as well as examining the future of education. A great variety of selected classical readings are included with authors such as William Penn, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Noah Webster, Ralph Waldo-Emerson, G. Stanley Hall, John Dewey, Booker T. Washington, Jane Addams, W.E.B. DuBois, E.L. Thorndike, and others. An overview of the many facets and issues of teaching are introduced. (Students who wish to enter the Educator Preparation Program must earn a C or better in this course.)

  • EDUC 2381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 4000 CLINICAL TEACHING SEMINAR

    EDUC 4000 Clinical Teaching Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): Enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    This course is founded on foundational research-based content and best practices in education concerning the topics of classroom management, assessment and professional development. The seminar for clinical teachers is interactive includes exploration of issues of particular interest and value to students as they complete their Educator Preparation Programs. These issues include the process of acquiring a teaching position (applications, resumes, interview skills, etc.), classroom management/discipline, ethical and legal issues related to teaching, communication with parents, portfolio construction and other issues encountered during clinical teaching. Support and encouragement in the form of sharing and problem solving will occur during each of the weekly sessions.

  • EDUC 4100 TExES STATE CERTIFICATION PREP

    EDUC 4100 TExES State Certification Preparation Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and a degree plan on file in the Office of the Registrar and completion of at least 90 credit hours of degree plan specified course work
    This course assists students in understanding the state and federal standards for their chosen certification areas. Students complete intensive reviews for their Pedagogy and Professionalism (PPR) and content area certification exams. They must successfully complete PPR and content area practice exams. This course must be completed prior to entering clinical teaching.

  • EDUC 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 4281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 4281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 4301 C & I ELEM SCHOOL

    EDUC 4301 Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program.
    This course is designed to provide an integrated and in-depth understanding of principles of curriculum and instruction, as well as practical experiences in instructional design for elementary school contexts and learners. Multiple approaches to learning, the roles of teachers in the teaching-learning process, as well as current Texas state curriculum requirements and guidelines are explored. The effective use of media/technology is included. Field work is required.

  • EDUC 4311 C & I SEC SCHOOL

    EDUC 4311 Curriculum and Instruction in the Secondary School
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program
    This course is designed to provide an integrated and in-depth understanding of principles of curriculum and instruction, as well as practical experiences in instructional design for secondary school contexts and learners. Multiple approaches to learning, the roles of teachers in the teaching-learning process, as well as current Texas state curriculum requirements and guidelines are explored. The effective use of media/technology is included. Field work is required.

  • EDUC 4320 TEACH METHODOLOGY:SECONDARY

    EDUC 4320 Teaching Methodology for Secondary Teachers
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Educator Preparation Program and (EDUC 4301 or EDUC 4311)
    This course combines campus-based instruction with field-based experiences. Students observe as well as plan and present lessons in their designated content area. An emphasis is placed upon content specific instructional methods, using data to make instructional decisions and application of classroom management skills. This course must be completed before clinical teaching.

  • EDUC 4340 ACTION RESEARCH

    EDUC 4340 Action Research
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The Action Research model is explored and students complete an Action Research project. Preparation for certification exams is also a component of the course. Students take this course either immediately preceding clinical teaching or concurrent with clinical teaching if clinical teaching occurs in the fall semester.

  • EDUC 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 4400 CLINICAL TEACHING SEMINAR

    EDUC 4400 Clinical Teaching Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): Clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    This course is founded on foundational research-based content and best practices in education concerning the topics of classroom management, assessment and professional development. The seminar for clinical teachers is interactive includes exploration of issues of particular interest and value to students as they complete their Educator Preparation Programs. These issues include the process of acquiring a teaching position (applications, resumes, interview skills, etc.), classroom management/discipline, ethical and legal issues related to teaching, communication with parents, portfolio construction and other issues encountered during clinical teaching. Support and encouragement in the form of sharing and problem solving will occur during each of the weekly sessions.

  • EDUC 4461 CLINICAL TCH: ELEM SPANISH

    EDUC 4461 Clinical Teaching in Elementary School Spanish
    Prerequisite(s): Approval for clinical teaching by the Center for the Preparation of Professional Educators (CPPE)
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4462

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate Educator Preparation Program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Languages Other Than English Spanish Grades (EC-12). The corerequisite of EDUC 4462 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience.

  • EDUC 4462 CLINIC TCH: SECONDARY SPANISH

    EDUC 4462 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Spanish
    Prerequisite(s): Approval for clinical teaching by the Center for the Preparation of Professional Educators (CPPE)
    Corerequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4461

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite of EDUC 4461 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Languages Other Than English Spanish Grades (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4471 CLINICAL TCH: EC-6 CLASSROOM

    EDUC 4471 Clinical Teaching in the EC-6 Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4472

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The prerequisite of EDUC 4472 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in the EC-6 and Special Education (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4472 CLINICAL TCH:SPECIAL EDUCATION

    EDUC 4472 Clinical Teaching in Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4471

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corerequisite of EDUC 4471 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in EC-6 and in Special Education Grades (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4481 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 4481 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 4484 CL TCH: ELEMENTARY PE

    EDUC 4484 Clinical Teaching in Elementary PE
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4485

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite of EDUC 4485 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Physical Education (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4485 CL TCH: SECONDARY PHYS EDUC

    EDUC 4485 Clinical Teaching in Secondary PE
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4484

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite of EDUC 4484 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Physical Education (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4487 CLINICAL TCH:BILINGUAL CLASSRM

    EDUC 4487 Clinical Teaching in the Bilingual Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Bilingual Generalist-Spanish (EC-6).

  • EDUC 4493 CL TCH: ELEM SCHOOL ART

    EDUC 4493 Clinical Teaching in Elementary Art
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4496

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite of EDUC 4496 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Art (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4494 CL TCH: ELEM SCHOOL MUSIC

    EDUC 4494 Clinical Teaching in Elementary School Music
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and (EDUC 4497 or EDUC 4498)

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite of either EDUC 4497 or EDUC 4498 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Art (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4495 CL TCH: SECONDARY SCHOOL SUBJ

    EDUC 4495 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Subjects
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. This course is part of the preparation for both a BS degree and high school certification (grades 7-12) in the chosen teaching field.

  • EDUC 4496 CL TCH: SECONDARY ART

    EDUC 4496 Clinical Teaching in Secondary Art
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4493

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite of EDUC 4493 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Art (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4497 CLITCH: SEC SCH CHORAL MUSIC

    EDUC 4497 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Choral Music
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4494

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 4494 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Art (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4498 CL TCH: SEC SCH INSTR MUSIC

    EDUC 4498 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Instrumental Music
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400 and EDUC 4494

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 4494 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Art (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4872 CLINICAL TCH: ALL-LEVEL SP ED

    EDUC 4872 Clinical Teaching in All-Level Special Education
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in Special Education (EC-12).

  • EDUC 4873 CLINICAL TCH: EC-6 CLASSROOM

    EDUC 4873 Clinical Teaching in the EC-6 Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 4400

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the undergraduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in the EC-6.

  • EDUC 4876 CLINICAL TCH: EC-CLASSROOM

    EDUC 4876 Clinical Teaching in the EC-6Bilingual Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in HBU undergraduate educator preparation programs. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. Students enrolled in clinical teaching must also enroll and attend EDUC 4400 Clinical Teaching Seminar. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in EC-6 with Bilingual.

  • EDUC 4893 CL TCH: MIDDLE GRADES

    EDUC 4893 Clinical Teaching in the Middle School Grades
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in HBU undergraduate educator preparation programs. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. Students enrolled in clinical teaching must also enroll and attend EDUC 4400 Clinical Teaching Seminar. This course is part of the preparation for both the BS degree and certification in grades four through eighth (4-8) in a chosen teaching field.

  • EDUC 4894 CL TCH: HIGH SCHOOL GRADES

    EDUC 4894 Clinical Teaching in the High School Grades
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.
    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in HBU undergraduate teacher preparation programs. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. Students enrolled in clinical teaching must also enroll and attend the EDUC 4400 Clinical Teaching Seminar. This option leads to grades seven through twelve (7-12) teacher certification in a chosen teaching field. In the undergraduate program, it also requires completion of a major in the teaching field. This major provides the specialization and depth of study necessary for Texas teacher certification.

  • EDUC 5000 CLINICAL TEACHING SEMINAR

    EDUC 5000 Clinical Teaching Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): Enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    This course is founded on foundational research-based content and best practices in education concerning the topics of classroom management, assessment and professional development. The seminar for clinical teachers is interactive includes exploration of issues of particular interest and value to students as they complete their Educator Preparation Programs. These issues include the process of acquiring a teaching position (applications, resumes, interview skills, etc.), classroom management/discipline, ethical and legal issues related to teaching, communication with parents, portfolio construction and other issues encountered during clinical teaching. Support and encouragement in the form of sharing and problem solving will occur during each of the weekly sessions.

  • EDUC 5101 INTERNSHIP I

    EDUC 5101 Internship I
    Prerequisite(s): (Must have an Alternate Certification Program (ACP) plan on file in the School of Education or a Master’s with Initial Certification degree plan on file in the Registrar’s Office) and be employed in an EC-12 school as a teacher
    This is a field-based course required for students in the HBU Alternate Certification Program (ACP) or in a Master’s with Initial certification degree plan. To be enrolled in the course, the student must be employed as a teacher in an EC-12 state-accredited school. HBU faculty will provide regular supervision and support for the student during the semester to assist the student in becoming a successful and effective teacher. (Offered Fall and Spring only.)

  • EDUC 5181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 5181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 5201 INTERNSHIP II

    EDUC 5201 Internship II
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 5101 and be employed as a teacher in an EC-12 state-accredited school in the semester immediately prior (excluding summer)
    This is a field-based course required for students in the HBU Post-Baccalaureate with Certification Program or in a Master’s with Initial Certification degree plan. HBU faculty will provide regular supervision and support for the student during the semester to assist the student in becoming a successful and effective teacher. Preparation for the EC-12 Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities certification exam is provided during this course. (Offered Fall and Spring only.)

  • EDUC 5281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 5281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 5320 TEACH METHOD:SECONDARY TEACHER

    EDUC 5320 Teaching Methodology for Secondary Teachers
    Prerequisite(s): Teacher Certification
    This course combines campus-based instruction with a minimum of 25 clock hours of field-based experience in observation and the planning and presenting of lessons for prospective student teachers or interns. An emphasis is placed upon lesson presentation skills; lesson preparation and planning, using a variety of teaching methods including technology; application of classroom management skills; and research into the teaching of the specific content area for which the student is being certified.

  • EDUC 5335 CLINICAL TCH:4-8 CLASSROOM

    EDUC 5335 Clinical Teaching in the 4-8 Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. This course is part of the preparation for both a MED degree and certification (grades 4-8) in the chosen teaching field.

  • EDUC 5350 SCIENCE:PRE-ADOLESCENTS

    EDUC 5350 Science for Pre-Adolescents
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is an exploration of teaching science for educators in preschool through grade 6. Graduate students will examine a variety of science curricula as well as teaching/learning materials and strategies for developing new content and skills at preschool through grade 6 levels. Applications of knowledge and skills are emphasized. Technology applications are required.

  • EDUC 5360 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF MATH

    EDUC 5360 Essential Elements of Math
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 5313 or EDUC 5314 or EDUC 6302 or EDUC 6312 or teacher certification
    This course prepares prospective and practicing preschool, elementary school and middle school teachers to teach mathematics effectively. Students acquire an in-depth knowledge of the content, methods, and materials involved in the development of mathematical processes and in development of the number and operations strand of preschool, elementary, and middle school mathematics. Classroom applications and use of models and manipulatives are emphasized. Fieldwork in which students teach mathematics in an elementary or middle school is required.

  • EDUC 5361 CLINICAL TCH: ELEM SPANISH

    EDUC 5361 Clinical Teaching in Elementary School Spanish
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5362 and EDUC 5000 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 5362 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in Spanish (EC-12).

  • EDUC 5362 CLINIC TCH: SECONDARY SPANISH

    EDUC 5362 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Spanish
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5361 and EDUC 5000 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 5361 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in Spanish (EC-12).

  • EDUC 5371 CLINICAL TEACH:EC-6 CLASSROOM

    EDUC 5371 Clinical Teaching in the EC-6 Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. This course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in EC-6 or EC-6 Bilingual.

  • EDUC 5373 CLINICAL TCH:7-12 CLASSROOM

    EDUC 5373 Clinical Teaching in the 7-12 Classroom
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. This course is part of the preparation for both a MED degree and high school certification (grades 7-12) in the chosen teaching field.

  • EDUC 5374 CLIN TCH:EC-6/SPED EC-12 CLASS

    EDUC 5374 Clinical Teaching in EC-6/Special Education EC-12 Classrooms
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned from Monday through Friday for the entire school day in an EC- 6 classroom for half of the semester and are assigned in a Special Education EC-12 classroom for the remainder of the semester. This course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in EC-6 and in Special Education Grades (EC-12).

  • EDUC 5375 ESSEN ELEMENTS:FA & PE/HEALTH

    EDUC 5375 Essential Elements of Fine Arts and PE/Health
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores EC-6 fine arts, PE and Health content and methodology. It includes development of knowledge skills, and dispositions identified in the art, music, theatre, PE and Health TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills), as well as ways to integrate into learning in other content areas.

  • EDUC 5380 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS:SOCIAL STUD

    EDUC 5380 Essential Elements of Social Studies
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 6302 or EDUC 6312
    This course provides an in-depth study of social studies content and skills, as well as teaching/learning materials and strategies for developing content and skills at preschool through grade 12 levels. Teachers will apply content knowledge as they learn to implement and enhance classroom essential knowledge and skills; construct assessments that assess in a differentiated manner using multiple approaches to assessment; and create diagnostic assessment tools. Emphasis is placed on developing a professional perspective and knowledge base designed for service as a teacher leader at campus/district/national levels. Technology integration to enhance instruction is an integral element of the course.

  • EDUC 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 5384 CLINICAL TCH: ELEMENTARY PE

    EDUC 5384 Clinical Teaching in Elementary Physical Education
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and EDUC 5385 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 5385 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in Physical Education (EC-12).

  • EDUC 5385 CLINICAL TCH: SECONDARY PE

    EDUC 5385 Clinical Teaching in Secondary Physical Education
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and EDUC 5384 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 5384 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in Physical Education (EC-12).

  • EDUC 5393 CLINICAL TCHING ELEMENTARY ART

    EUDC 5393 Clinical Teaching in Elementary School Art
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and EDUC 5396 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 5396 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in Art (EC-12).

  • EDUC 5394 CLINICAL TCH:ELEM SCHOOL MUSIC

    EDUC 5394 Clinical Teaching in Elementary School Music
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and (EDUC 5397 or EDUC 5398) and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 5397 or EDUC 5398 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in Music (EC-12).

  • EDUC 5396 CLINICAL TCHING SECONDARY ART

    EDUC 5396 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Art
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and EDUC 5393 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 5393 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in Art (EC-12).

  • EDUC 5397 CLINICAL TCH:SECONDARY CHORAL

    EDUC 5397 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Choral Music
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and EDUC 5394 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 5394 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in Music (EC-12).

  • EDUC 5398 CLINICAL TCH SECONDARY INSTRU

    EDUC 5398 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Instrumental Music
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 5000 and EDUC 5394 and enrollment in clinical teaching in student’s area of certification

    Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in the graduate educator preparation program. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In this course students are assigned to a classroom or classrooms for half of the semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day. The corequisite EDUC 5394 provides a full semester of clinical teaching experience. The course is part of the preparation for both the MED degree and certification in Music (EC-12).

  • EDUC 6181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 6181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EDUC 6301 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    EDUC 6301 Classroom Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of a broad spectrum of approaches to classroom management, including authoritarian, behavior-modification, group-process, instructional, and psycho-emotional-climate orientations. Examination of research regarding effective classroom management. Exploration of multiple strategies for handling common classroom management problems.(Offered also as EDAD 6307.)

  • EDUC 6302 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL C&I

    EDUC 6302 Elementary School Curriculum and Instruction
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide an integrated and in-depth understanding of principles of curriculum and instruction, as well as practical experiences in instructional design for elementary school contexts and learners. Multiple approaches to learning, the roles of teachers in the teaching-learning process, as well as current Texas state curriculum requirements and guidelines are explored. The effective use of media/technology is included. Fieldwork is required.

  • EDUC 6304 CHILD, ADOL & LEARN

    EDUC 6304 Children, Adolescents, and Learning
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course combines a study of learning (including both cognitive and behavioral perspectives), human development (childhood through adolescence), and assessment (traditional and performance; teacher-made and standardized). Related constructs such as motivation and self-esteem are explored.

  • EDUC 6312 SECONDARY SCHOOL C&I

    EDUC 6312 Secondary School Curriculum and Instruction
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide an integrated and in-depth understanding of principles of curriculum and instruction, as well as practical experiences in instructional design for secondary school contexts and learners. Multiple approaches to learning, the roles of teachers in the teaching-learning process, as well as current Texas state curriculum requirements and guidelines are explored. The effective use of media/technology is included. Fieldwork is required.

  • EDUC 6315 AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL REFORM

    EDUC 6315 American Educational Reform
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this course of study the historical, philosophical, sociological and political influences of the past, present, and future issues and trends of American education are examined. Emphasis is placed on interconnectivity and impact on teaching and learning in both private and public venues. Study framed within this context provides opportunity for the professional educator to develop a deeper understanding of the current challenges faced in educational settings. A broad selection of readings range from traditional classical works to current perspectives on challenging issues such as: demographics, diversity, vouchers, charter schools, home schooling, accountability, high-stakes testing, special needs, giftedness, bilingual instruction, technology, and more.

  • EDUC 6320 RESEARCH TECH/ PROCEDURES

    EDUC 6320 Research Techniques and Procedures
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of a spectrum of research methods related to psychological and educational research. The course is designed to develop research knowledge and skills. Included are theory, techniques, designs, evaluation of research, and integration of findings into professional decision-making. (Offered also as EDAD 6310 and PSYC 6320.)

  • EDUC 6322 C&I: GRADES K-12

    EDUC 6322 Curriculum and Instruction: Grades K-12
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides a study of influencing factors and guiding principles for curriculum and instruction in grades K-12. It includes practical experience in instructional design as well as first-hand teaching experiences. It is designed to provide integrated and in-depth understandings of principles and processes for curriculum and instruction, as well as practical experiences in planning and facilitating learning (instructional design, media/technology usage, and classroom teaching). The role of the student and teacher in the teacher-learning process as well as current Texas curriculum requirements, including Essential Knowledge and Skills, are explored.

  • EDUC 6330 TCH METHODOLOGY: PROFESSIONAL

    EDUC 6330 Teaching Methodology for the Professional
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Structured to meet the needs of those professionals who must design, organize, and present materials to various target populations, this graduate level course focuses on teaching methods, media, and evaluation of the learning process.

  • EDUC 6370 CRITICAL ISSUES/ TEACHING

    EDUC 6370 Critical Issues in Teaching Reading in the Elementary School
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An analysis of issues important to effective development of reading abilities during the elementary school years. Emphasis is placed upon teaching comprehension processes and understanding factors which affect comprehension processes.

  • EDUC 6371 CRITICAL ISSUES/ TEACHING

    EDUC 6371 Critical Issues in Teaching Reading in the Secondary School
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An analysis of issues important to effective development of reading abilities during the secondary school years. Emphasis is placed upon teaching comprehension processes and understanding factors which affect comprehension processes.

  • EDUC 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EDUC 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ELEN 2325 ELECTRICAL AND MAGNETIC FIELDS

    ELEN 2325 Electrical and Magnetic Fields
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2423 and ENSC 2361 and MATH 2451
    Vector analysis, Coulomb’s and Gauss’ Law. Electric field streamlines. Energy and potential. Conductors, dielectrics, capacitance. Maxwell’s, Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations. Steady magnetic fields. Joule’s Law. Ampere’s Circuit Law, magnetic flux and potential, magnetic forces, materials and inductance, time-varying electromagnetic fields, Maxwell’s equations, plane waves, transmission lines, impedance-matching devices.

  • ELEN 2341 INTRO MICROPROCESSORS DIG DESI

    ELEN 2341 Introduction to Microprocessors & Digital Design
    Prerequisite(s): Credit for or concurrent enrollment in MATH 2451
    Introduction to microprocessor organization and operation, data manipulation, assembly and/or embedded-C language programming, serial communication, analog-to-digital conversion, timers, interrupts, DC motor control. Digital design techniques, Boolean algebra, combinational logic, minimization techniques, simple arithmetic circuits, programmable logic, sequential circuit design, registers and counters, state machines, Verilog and VHDL.

  • ELEN 2362 ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS II

    ELEN 2362 Electrical Circuits II
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 2361
    Steady-state and transient analysis of RL, RC and RLC circuits. Design problems using circuit analysis programs. Analysis of ideal and non-ideal operational amplifiers. Magnetically coupled circuits. Complex frequency. Two-port networks. Laplace transforms. Frequency response.

  • ELEN 3342 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING

    ELEN 3342 Digital Signal Processing
    Prerequisite(s): ELEN 3361
    Discrete signals, LTI systems, discrete Fourier analysis, discrete filters, sampling, Z-transforms.

  • ELEN 3361 LINEAR SYSTEMS

    ELEN 3361 Linear Systems
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 2361 and MATH 2451
    Fourier Series, Fourer Transform, LaPlace Transform. Convolution and the system function. Filters. State variable representation and solution.

  • ELEN 3362 SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS

    ELEN 3362 Solid State Electronics
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 2451 and PHYS 2423 and ENSC 2361
    Fundamentals of solid state electronic materials and devices, emphasizing semiconductors and principles of operation of ULSI devices.

  • ELEN 3363 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS

    ELEN 3363 Electronic Circuits
    Prerequisite(s): ELEN 2351 and ELEN 3362
    Circuit-level behavior of diodes, bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors, and operational amplifiers. Analysis and design of linear amplifiers. Frequency domain characterization of transistor circuits.

  • ELEN 4341 EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

    ELEN 4341 Embedded Systems
    Prerequisite(s): ELEN 2341
    Assembly and C programming on a customizable microprocessor implemented on an FPGA board. Verilog components, RTOS, debuggin techniques, state machines, software revision control, DSP programming.

  • ELEN 4371 INSTRUMENTATION & MEASUREMENT

    ELEN 4371 Instrumentation and Measurement
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 2361
    Transducers, including 4-20 mA loops. Signal Conditioning. Industrial Control Electronics, including Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). Statistical analysis on experimental data.

  • ELEN 4372 COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

    ELEN 4372 Communication Systems
    Prerequisite(s): ELEN 3342
    Analog and digital communication systems. Random signals, noise and filtering. Physical constraints. Multiplexing. Properties of AM, FM, PSK, and QAM systems.

  • ELEN 4373 SCADA SYSTEMS

    ELEN 4373 SCADA Systems
    Prerequisite(s): ELEN 3361 and MATH 2451
    Analysis and design of linear systems. Mathematical modeling. Transfer functions and signal-flow graphs. State variable analysis. Time domain analysis and design of linear control systems. Frequency domain analysis and design of linear control systems. Security of cyber physical systems.

  • ENGL 1303 BASIC GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION

    ENGL 1303 Basic Grammar and Composition
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A prerequisite course for enrollment in ENGL 1313 for students scoring below 22 on the Reading section of the ACT or below 570 on the SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (EBRW). Students with no available test scores will also be enrolled in ENGL 1303. ENGL 1303 is an introduction to the principles of composition accomplished through the study of grammar, standard English usage, and rhetorical techniques and strategies. This course emphasizes basic grammar and composition and focuses on sentence structure and on organizing and developing the short essay. ENGL 1303 does not meet the Liberal Arts Core requirements for either the BA or the BS degree but does carry elective credit.

  • ENGL 1313 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE I

    ENGL 1313 Composition and Literature
    Prerequisite: SAT Evidence Based Reading and Writing (EBRW) section score of 570 or ACT Reading 22 or ENGL 1303 with a minimum grade of C
    An introduction to the principles of composition and rhetoric accomplished through the writing of expository essays and through the study both of the principles of composition and of essays which employ specific rhetorical strategies. Students complete a research paper.

  • ENGL 1313 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE I

    ENGL 1313 Composition and Literature
    Prerequisite: SAT Evidence Based Reading and Writing (EBRW) section score of 570 or ACT Reading 22 or ENGL 1303 with a minimum grade of C
    An introduction to the principles of composition and rhetoric accomplished through the writing of expository essays and through the study both of the principles of composition and of essays which employ specific rhetorical strategies. Students complete a research paper.

  • ENGL 1320 WRITING FOR WISDOM I

    ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I
    Prerequisite(s): SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (EBRW) 570 or ACT English 22 or ENGL 1303 with a minimum grade of C
    This course teaches the fundamentals of college reading, thinking, and writing from a classical, Christian perspective. Writing for Wisdom grounds students in a deep understanding of and appreciation for proper standards of written English including mechanical skills and forms while using writing as a vehicle for intellectual, emotional, ethical, and spiritual wrestling. It moves past the kinds of fashionable current event topics normally assigned in freshmen Composition classes. Rather, students engage in wider issues and questions: Who am I? Why am I here? What is my purpose? How do I know I am of value? Finally, through a close study of a series of classical works from our Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian heritage, students will explore their status as citizens of a deliberative democracy and seek to define, and manifest in their lives, the nature of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful.

  • ENGL 1323 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE II

    ENGL 1323 Composition and Literature
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1313 (or its equivalent.)
    An introduction to the principles of composition and rhetoric accomplished through the writing of expository essays and through the study both of the principles of composition and of essays which employ specific rhetorical strategies. ENGL 1323 is a continuation of the study of composition and rhetoric introduced in ENGL 1313. ENGL 1323 concentrates on the writing of expository, argumentative and researched essays through the study of the principles of composition, of research, and of literary analysis. Students complete a research paper.

  • ENGL 1323 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE II

    ENGL 1323 Composition and Literature
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1313 (or its equivalent.)
    An introduction to the principles of composition and rhetoric accomplished through the writing of expository essays and through the study both of the principles of composition and of essays which employ specific rhetorical strategies. ENGL 1323 is a continuation of the study of composition and rhetoric introduced in ENGL 1313. ENGL 1323 concentrates on the writing of expository, argumentative and researched essays through the study of the principles of composition, of research, and of literary analysis. Students complete a research paper.

  • ENGL 1330 WRITING FOR WISDOM II

    ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320
    This course continues the study of composition and rhetoric introduced in English 1320: Writing for Wisdom I. Students will gain an understanding of why reading literature is deeply important for Christians, learn the conventions of such literary genres as poems, stories, novels, and plays, study methods of literary analysis, interpret literature from a Biblical perspective through the exploration of Biblical archetypes, typology, language constructions, and metaphor in classic works of English literature, and learn to write well-constructed and well-written arguments about literature and life in standard English including the use of research in MLA format and the writing of a fully developed research paper.

  • ENGL 2315 GREAT WORKS OF LITERATURE I

    ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A reading course in the literary heritage of western civilization. This course includes readings from the Greeks, the Romans, and the Middle Ages.

  • ENGL 2321 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ENGL 2321 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • ENGL 2321 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ENGL 2321 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

  • ENGL 2325 GREAT WORKS OF LITERATURE II

    ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A reading course in the literary heritage of western civilization. This course includes readings from the 18th century to the present.

  • ENGL 3313 ENGLISH LITERATURE I

    ENGL 3313 English Literature I
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A survey of the historical development of English literature from its beginning through the eighteenth century: historical background and major authors of each period. The course will provide requisite information for advanced study in major periods of English literature. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3321 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ENGL 3321 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ENGL 3323 ENGLISH LITERATURE II

    ENGL 3323 English Literature II
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A survey of the historical development of English literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: historical background and major authors of each period. The course will provide requisite information for advanced study in major periods of English literature. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3331 AMERICAN LITERATURE I

    ENGL 3331 American Literature I
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course examines the beginnings of America’s literary self-definition in the Colonial Period and covers the rise of American Romanticism and its culmination in writers such as Emerson, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Dickinson. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3332 AMERICAN LITERATURE II

    ENGL 3332 American Literature II
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course examines American literary trends after the Civil War, including Realism, Naturalism, and Modernism. Writers under consideration include Twain, S. Crane, Frost, Stevens, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3334 LITERATURE/CULTURE:SOUTHWEST

    ENGL 3334 Literature and Culture of the Southwest
    Prerequisite(s): (ENGL 1320 or ENGL 1313) and (ENGL 1330 and ENGL 1323)
    The course addresses the way the American West has shaped American culture and popular culture. It examines the Frontier Myth, Manifest Destiny, Regeneration through Violence, America’s cowboy archetype, the savage archetype, and the American dream. Students read literature written by authors from a variety of cultures, including Anglo, Mexican-American, and Native American. Students view television shows and films to examine how popular culture has created and enforced stereotypes. The course is designed for non-majors seeking upper level elective credit or to fulfill Liberal Arts Core requirements.

  • ENGL 3342 WOMEN’S LITERATURE

    ENGL 3342 Women’s Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course will acquaint students with literature by and about women from the medieval period to the present. Through a study of various literary genres, students will learn that the issues that concern women transcend time, place, race, religion, and ethnicity. This course is designed for non-English majors seeking upper level elective credit or to fulfill Liberal Arts Core requirements and for persons seeking certification in Language Arts Grades 6-8 and Grades 8-12.

  • ENGL 3346 AUSTEN AND THE BRONTES

    ENGL 3346 Austen and the Brontes
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course covers selected novels of Jane Austen and Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Bronte, influential 19th century writers who wrote of affairs of the heart with insight and passion. Students will study the authors’ social and intellectual milieu and discuss their works and compare them to some of the film adaptations of these popular works.

  • ENGL 3363 FILM STUDIES

    ENGL 3363 Film Studies
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    An introduction to the art of film. Students are provided with a methodology and a vocabulary for understanding film and are encouraged to consider how different directors guide and shape our perceptions of reality, how different genres generate their own unique vision of the world and of humanity, how the multi-media aspects of film affect us as viewers, how film provides us with a record of cultural values and cultural change, and how screen writers, actors, directors, and cinematographers translate literary genres into visual terms. This course may be used for elective credit.

  • ENGL 3370 HISPANIC LITERATURE

    ENGL 3370 Hispanic Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    The study of major periods and masterworks of Hispanic literature, read and discussed in English. Introduces literary/cultural figures of medieval and early modern Spain (El Cid, Don Quixote, Don Juan); and includes major 20th-century writers, as well as literary movements that were propagated from Latin America to the rest of the literary world (e.g., magical realism). This course may not be used to fulfill requirements for the Spanish major. (Offered also as SPAN 3370.)

  • ENGL 3371 CHRONICLES OF NARNIA

    ENGL 3371 Chronicles of Narnia
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Students complete a close reading of the seven novels that make up the Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. Students assess how and to what extent the Chronicles successfully foster spiritual maturity, strength of character, and moral virtue. Special focus will be placed on the Christian allegories that underlie each of the novels.

  • ENGL 3372 MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE

    ENGL 3372 Multicultural Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Students study ethnic literatures, including works by authors from the following cultural voices: North American Indian, African American, Mexican American, Asian American, and Americans of Middle Eastern descent.

  • ENGL 3373 SHAKESPEARE

    ENGL 3373 Shakespeare
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    A study of selected tragedies, history plays, and comedies, with emphasis on the major tragedies. Some consideration will be given to the cultural and philosophical characteristics of the Elizabethan Age as they are reflected in the drama of Shakespeare. For English majors or permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3377 LORD OF THE RINGS

    ENGL 3377 Lord of the Rings
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Students complete readings from Beowulf and selected Arthurian romances and a close reading of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. The course also includes an overview of The Silmarillion and a discussion of how Tolkien was influenced by Norse mythology, Beowulf, Arthurian Romances, his Catholic faith, and his friendship with C. S. Lewis.

  • ENGL 3378 THE LEGACY OF GREECE

    ENGL 3378 The Legacy of Greece
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course takes students on an exciting journey through the great literary works of Ancient Greece: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey; Aeschylus’ Oresteia (Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, Eumenides), Sophocles’ Oedipus, Antigone, Women of Trachis, and Philoctetes; Euripides’ Medea, Hippolytus and Bacchae. The course examines the nature of the epic and tragic hero and those universal questions we all must answer for ourselves: Who am I?, What is my purpose?, How do I know I am of value? The course will also offer an overview of ancient Greek history and consider Greece’s legacy for Western civilization.

  • ENGL 3379 THE LEGACY OF ROME

    ENGL 3379 The Legacy of Rome
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course takes students on an exciting journey through the great literary works of Ancient Rome and Medieval Italy: Virgil’s Aeneid; Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Dante’s Divine Comedy: Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso. The course examines the nature of the classical and medieval epic hero and those universal questions we all must answer for ourselves: Who am I?, What is my purpose?, How do I know I am of value? The course will also offer an overview of ancient Roman history, consider Rome’s legacy for Western civilization, and discuss how Dante, while imitating pagan writers, was able to fashion a Christian epic.

  • ENGL 3381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ENGL 3381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330.
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ENGL 3384 RELIGION:AMERICAN LIT/FILM

    ENGL 3384 Religion in American Literature and Film
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Students read novels, including Flannery O’Connor’s Wise Blood, Davis Grubb’s Night of the Hunter (screenplay by James Agee), Sinclair Lewis’s Elmer Gantry, and Marilyn Robinson’s Gilead. Students also view films based on these and other novels that portray religion in 20th century American society, and learn to analyze both genres for plot, characterization, metaphors, themes and other literary elements.

  • ENGL 3385 THE WRITINGS OF C.S. LEWIS

    ENGL 3385 The Writings of C.S. Lewis
    Prerequisite(s): None
    C.S. Lewis, the greatest Christian apologist of the 20th century, has challenged three generations of readers to think logically and imaginatively about their faith, their moral behavior, and their view of man, God, and the universe. This class will study closely Lewis’s seven major apologetical works (Mere Christianity, The Problem of Pain, Miracles, Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Abolition of Man, and A Grief Observed) and seek to determine why these works have had such a phenomenal and growing impact both on Christians of all denominations and on those of other (or no) religious backgrounds.

  • ENGL 3386 THE INKLINGS

    ENGL 3386 The Inklings
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Although the late 19th century was a golden age for children’s literature, after WWI a more cynical, realistic Europe relegated fairy tales to the nursery. A group known as the Inklings–which centered on C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams–played a major role in revising the reputation of fantastical literature. This class will study Lewis’s Space Trilogy (Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, That Hideous Strength) and Till We Have Faces, Tolkien’s shorter fairy tales and essay On Fairy Stories, and one of the spiritual warfare novels of Charles Williams (Descent into Hell). The class will also consider how the Inklings were influenced by the faerie stories of George MacDonald (Phantastes, Lillith), and the imaginative apologetics of G.K. Chesterton (Orthodoxy, The Everlasting Man).

  • ENGL 4311 LITERARY CRITICISM

    ENGL 4311 Literary Criticism
    Prerequisite(s): (ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330) or (HNRS 2310 and HNRS 2340)
    A survey of literary theory from Plato to Postmodernism. The course provides an understanding of the different theoretical structures, schools, and methodologies that have influenced our understanding and appreciation of literature. It explores the presuppositions upon which each theoretical system is founded and the special terminology associated with each system. Students planning to pursue a graduate degree are strongly encouraged to take this course.

  • ENGL 4330 MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

    ENGL 4330 Medieval Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Middle Ages in Britain (ca. 450-1485). Works and authors may include Beowulf, Gawain and the Green Knight, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Gower’s Confessio Amantis, Langland’s Piers Plowman, and Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur. As Rome waned, western Europe was transformed politically by the rise of feudal kingdoms and religiously by the flowering of an influential and dynamic Church. In this class, we will examine closely how different works and authors reflect and engage the many facets of medieval culture, including chivalry and heroism, courtly love, practical Christian piety, and the grim realities of war at home and abroad.

  • ENGL 4331 RENAISSANCE ENGLISH LIT

    ENGL 4331 Renaissance English Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Renaissance in England (1485-1600). Works and authors may include William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas More’s Utopia, Elizabeth I, Francis Bacon, Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella, and Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene. In a time of new classical learning, violent religious controversy, and political upheaval, Renaissance England was rich with remarkable creativity and artistic achievement in prose, poetry, and drama. In this class, we will examine closely how different Renaissance writers expressed and explored the human condition at all levels, in a period that speaks beautifully of the True and the Good perhaps more than any other.

  • ENGL 4332 17TH CENTURY ENGLISH LIT

    ENGL 4332 17th-Century English Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of seventeenth-century England (ca. 1601-1700). Works and authors may include John Donne’s lyric poetry, Ben Jonson’s comedies, John Webster’s macabre drama, George Herbert’s The Temple, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, Cavalier poetry, Richard Crashaw, Margaret Cavendish, Lucy Hutchinson, Thomas Browne, Andrew Marvell, Aphra Behn, and William Congreve. The literature of this period is extraordinary for elaborate form and conceit, intense meditative and devotional lyric, response to revolutionary scientific discoveries, and political satire, polemic, and debate through a period of civil war, regicide, and republican experiment.

  • ENGL 4333 18TH CENTURY BRITISH LIT

    ENGL 4333 18th-Century British Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Long Eighteenth Century (1688-1815). Works and authors may include John Dryden, Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Samuel Richardson’s Pamela, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones, Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, Alexander Pope, Laurence Sterne, Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, Frances Burney, and Jane Austen. Topics may include Enlightenment thought, Augustan poetry, sentimental fiction, comedy of manners, early gothic romance, satire, coffeehouses, the rise of the novel and of journalism, and developments in literary criticism, biography, the essay, and the dictionary.

  • ENGL 4334 THE ROMANTIC AGE

    ENGL 4334 The Romantic Age
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Romantic Age (1789-1832). Works and authors may include Blake’s Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Wordsworth’s Prelude, Coleridge’s Christabel, Byron’s Don Juan and Manfred, Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound, and Keats’s Eve of St. Agnes and Lamia. In this class, we will examine closely the unique zeitgeist of the Romantic Age, one that marks a transition between traditional, pre-French revolutionary Europe and the modern Europe of which we are heirs. Like the great figures of the Renaissance, the Romantics saw themselves as breaking from past traditions while yet carrying on perennial conversations about human nature, the natural world, the imagination, and the divine.

  • ENGL 4335 THE VICTORIAN AGE

    ENGL 4335 The Victorian Age
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of the key literature of the Victorian Age (1833-1901). Works and authors may include Tennyson’s In Memoriam and Idyls of the King, Browning’s Fra Lippo Lippi and Andrea del Sarto, Newman’s Apologia Pro Vita Sua, John Stuart Mill’s Autobiography, Ruskin’s Stones of Venice, Carlyle’s Sartor Resartus, T.H. Huxley’s On the Physical Basis of Life, and Arnold’s Function of Criticism. The Victorian Age was an age during which the orthodoxies of the past were put to the test by new theories of science, progress, philosophy, art, religion, authority, etc. In this class, we will examine closely how each Victorian writer reacted to and wrestled with these challenges.

  • ENGL 4336 20TH CENTURY BRITISH LIT

    ENGL 4336 20th-Century British Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course provides intensive study of major authors writing in English in Modern and contemporary letters. Authors may include T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and William Butler Yeats, among others. Special consideration will be given to the literature of the world wars, modernism, and post-modernism.

  • ENGL 4337 AMERICAN ROMANTICISM

    ENGL 4337 American Romanticism
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course is an intensive study of both American Renaissances — the one of American Transcendentalism with authors such as Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Whitman, Hawthorne, and Melville, as well as the renaissance of sentimental American writers such as Longfellow, Alcott, and Stowe.

  • ENGL 4338 AMERICAN REALISM & NATURALISM

    ENGL 4338 American Realism and Naturalism
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course is an intensive study of the great realists and naturalists, including Jack London, Edith Wharton, Henry James, Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, and Theodore Dreiser. Special attention will be paid to the historical context of American realism and its concomitant literary outgrowths, including magic realism and dystopian fiction.

  • ENGL 4339 AMER MODERNISM/CONTEMPORARY

    ENGL 4339 American Modernism and Contemporary Literature
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    This course is an intensive study of the rise of Modernism and the expatriate movement in American letters, with possible authors including Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, H.D., and Wallace Stevens. Contemporary experimental authors as well as the current use of modernist literary techniques will also be explored. Attention may also be paid to music and visual art of the modernist movement.

  • ENGL 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ENGL 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ENGL 6397 SHAKESPEARE: HISTORY AND FILM

    ENGL 6397 Shakespeare: History and Film
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to William Shakespeare’s plays about the Wars of the Roses; to examine those plays in the contexts of Shakespeare’s era and our own; to analyze his use and misuse of his sources for dramatic and political purposes; and to study the major modern cinematic and televised adaptations of the plays.

  • ENGR 1301 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING

    ENGR 1301 Introduction to Engineering
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1313 and MATH 1323
    An introduction to the engineering profession, including registration, ethics, and an introduction to the different fields of engineering. Topics include: a review of basic mathematical skills required for engineering, including operations with vectors, matrices, and complex numbers; the use of graphing calculators and computer algebra systems; an introduction to engineering analysis and design techniques; and the use of word processors, spreadsheets, and computer-aided-design software in engineering. Includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • ENGR 1302 INTRODUCTION:ENGINEERING II

    ENGR 1302 Introduction to Engineering II
    Prerequisite(s): ENGR 1301
    A continuation of ENGR 1301. Topics include: explorations of basic mechanics, acoustics, optics, thermodynamics, analog and digital electronics, and computer systems. This course also covers additional mathematical skills required for engineering: numerical techniques, statistics, nonlinear systems, iterative systems, and chaotic behavior. Includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

  • ENSC 1411 ENGINEERING CYBER PROJECTS I

    ENSC 1411 Engineering and Cyber Projects I
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1323
    An introduction to engineering profession, engineering design and problem-solving, computing, algorithms, programming and software structures, and computer systems.

  • ENSC 1412 ENGINEERING CYBER PROJECTS II

    ENSC 1412 Engineering and Cyber Projects II
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 1411
    Additional engineering and computing projects using electronic components, algorithms and programming, and applications.

  • ENSC 2321 STATICS/MECHANICS OF MATERIALS

    ENSC 2321 Statics and Mechanics of Materials
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 1412 and PHYS 2413 and MATH 1452
    Resultants and equilibrium of force systems, stress and strain, truss and frame analysis, torsion, bending.

  • ENSC 2322 THERMODYNAMICS

    ENSC 2322 Thermodynamics
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 1422 and MATH 1452
    Fundamental concepts, properties of pure substance, work, heat, first and second laws of thermodynamics, entropy, cycle analysis.

  • ENSC 2361 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CIRCUIT

    ENSC 2361 Electrical Engineering and Circuits
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 1422 and MATH 1451 and PHYS 2423
    Fundamental concepts, units and laws. Network theorems, network simplification, phasors and AC solution of circuits, power and electronic applications.

  • ENSC 4311 SENIOR PROJECT I

    ENSC 4311 Senior Project I
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    Open-ended, team-based design project that draws on student’s entire academic experience with emphasis on idea generation and conceptual design. Social and ethical aspects of engineering and computing. Communication skills.

  • ENSC 4312 SENIOR PROJECT II

    ENSC 4312 Senior Project II
    Prerequisite(s): ENSC 4311
    Continuations of ENSC 4311 with emphasis on implementation and testing.

  • ENSC 4315 INTERNSHIP/PROFESSIONAL EXP

    ENSC 4315 Internship/Professional Experience
    Prerequisite(s): Consent of Dean
    On-site, supervised, structured work experience. This course may be taken to facilitate a three month off-campus professional experience or part-time professional experience.

  • ENTR 6301 ENTREPRENEURSHIP & NEW VENTURE

    ENTR 6301 Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course focuses on the core principles of economics, with an emphasis on the specific terminology, models, and concepts describing the micro-economic entity of the firm. It will also integrate the core tenets that drive the American market system of free enterprise. Topics will include: a) producer supply, buyer demand, and the four market structures of monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition, and commodity-based perfect competition; b) marginal analysis of revenue, costs, profits, and productivity; and c) integrating pricing, revenue, and margins into decision making for the emerging entrepreneurial venture.

  • ENTR 6301 ENTREPRENEURSHIP & NEW VENTURE

    ENTR 6301 Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course focuses on the core principles of economics, with an emphasis on the specific terminology, models, and concepts describing the micro-economic entity of the firm. It will also integrate the core tenets that drive the American market system of free enterprise. Topics will include: a) producer supply, buyer demand, and the four market structures of monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition, and commodity-based perfect competition; b) marginal analysis of revenue, costs, profits, and productivity; and c) integrating pricing, revenue, and margins into decision making for the emerging entrepreneurial venture.

  • ENTR 6302 ENTRPR CREATIVITY & OPPTUNITY

    ENTR 6302 Entrepreneurial Creativity and Opportunity Recognition
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT 6390
    This course focuses on the core principles of economics, with an emphasis on the specific terminology, models, and concepts describing the micro-economic entity of the firm. It will also integrate the core tenets that drive the American market system of free enterprise. Topics will include: a) producer supply, buyer demand, and the four market structures of monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition, and commodity-based perfect competition; b) marginal analysis of revenue, costs, profits, and productivity; and c) integrating pricing, revenue, and margins into decision making for the emerging entrepreneurial venture.

  • ENTR 6302 ENTRPR CREATIVITY & OPPTUNITY

    ENTR 6302 Entrepreneurial Creativity and Opportunity Recognition
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT 6390
    This course focuses on the core principles of economics, with an emphasis on the specific terminology, models, and concepts describing the micro-economic entity of the firm. It will also integrate the core tenets that drive the American market system of free enterprise. Topics will include: a) producer supply, buyer demand, and the four market structures of monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition, and commodity-based perfect competition; b) marginal analysis of revenue, costs, profits, and productivity; and c) integrating pricing, revenue, and margins into decision making for the emerging entrepreneurial venture.

  • ENTR 6303 DEVELOPING BUSINESS PLAN

    ENTR 6303 Developing the Business Plan for the New Venutre
    Prerequisite(s): ENTR 6301
    This course focuses on the entrepreneur’s development of a comprehensive business plan, executive summary (XSumm), and slide presentation for a start-up or emerging growth venture. Topics include: a) the common 8 Facets of New Ventures, b) the competitive matrix, c) the Uses of Funds schedule, d) pro forma cash flows and venture potential, e) investor capitalization sheets and venture legal formation, f) the Business Model for the product-service, g) the format and targeted uses for an Executive Summary (XSumm), h) the business plan slide presentation (the pitch), and i) the format and attendees at public and private venutre forums.

  • ENTR 6303 DEVELOPING BUSINESS PLAN

    ENTR 6303 Developing the Business Plan for the New Venutre
    Prerequisite(s): ENTR 6301
    This course focuses on the entrepreneur’s development of a comprehensive business plan, executive summary (XSumm), and slide presentation for a start-up or emerging growth venture. Topics include: a) the common 8 Facets of New Ventures, b) the competitive matrix, c) the Uses of Funds schedule, d) pro forma cash flows and venture potential, e) investor capitalization sheets and venture legal formation, f) the Business Model for the product-service, g) the format and targeted uses for an Executive Summary (XSumm), h) the business plan slide presentation (the pitch), and i) the format and attendees at public and private venutre forums.

  • ENTR 6390 ENTREPRENEURIAL PRAXIS

    ENTR 6390 Entrepreneurial Praxis: Integrating the Emerging Venture Experience
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 6365 and ECON 6365 and ENTR 6301 and ENTR 6302 and ENTR 6303 and FINA 6365 and MGMT 6390 and MKTG 6365
    This course focuses on bringing together and integrating all facets of the program into a comprehensive entrepreneurial experience where students consult to a Houston-area entrepreneur/founding team on the complete new venture development process. This experience provides a working lab within which the full complement of the MSME courses come together in a formal, systematic manner. Topics include: a) comparisons-contrasts of the consulting venture and the student’s own proposed new venture, b) engaging in high-level dialogue with an entrepreneur/business owner across a wide range of pros and cons related to all facets of the venture development process, and c) recognizing various opportunities for strong ethics/morals throughout the many levels of entrepreneurial leadership in the firm.

  • ENTR 6390 ENTREPRENEURIAL PRAXIS

    ENTR 6390 Entrepreneurial Praxis: Integrating the Emerging Venture Experience
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 6365 and ECON 6365 and ENTR 6301 and ENTR 6302 and ENTR 6303 and FINA 6365 and MGMT 6390 and MKTG 6365
    This course focuses on bringing together and integrating all facets of the program into a comprehensive entrepreneurial experience where students consult to a Houston-area entrepreneur/founding team on the complete new venture development process. This experience provides a working lab within which the full complement of the MSME courses come together in a formal, systematic manner. Topics include: a) comparisons-contrasts of the consulting venture and the student’s own proposed new venture, b) engaging in high-level dialogue with an entrepreneur/business owner across a wide range of pros and cons related to all facets of the venture development process, and c) recognizing various opportunities for strong ethics/morals throughout the many levels of entrepreneurial leadership in the firm.

  • EPSY 5310 ETHICAL/PROF ISSUES:PSYC/COUN

    EPSY 5310 Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychology and Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A seminar format will provide the student with opportunities to study ethical standards and applications in mental health fields. (Offered also as PSYC 5310.)

  • EPSY 5313 METHODS/TECH:COUNSELING

    EPSY 5313 Methods and Techniques in Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will introduce the student to those active listening skills which communicate the qualities of empathy, genuineness and unconditional positive regard. The course will include role-playing and videotaped exercises. Other selected interventions will be included.

  • EPSY 5323 THEORIES: COUN & PSYCHOTHERAPY

    EPSY 5323 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Comprehensive and intensive study of major theoretical orientations in counseling and psychotherapy, stressing implications for research and practice. Includes experiences in micro-counseling and other simulations to develop counseling skills. (Offered also as PSYC 5323.)

  • EPSY 5330 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING

    EPSY 5330 Psychology of Learning
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A course stressing the contributions of major learning theories to understanding behavior. Particular attention is paid to human learning and the applicability of learning theory to the educational process as well as to goal attainments. (Offered also as PSYC 5330.)

  • EPSY 5363 PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE

    EPSY 5363 Principles of Guidance
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Introduction to philosophical and historical foundations of guidance and counseling, stressing practical problems of organizing and implementing guidance programs in the secondary and elementary schools. Consideration is given to professional issues, present and future, as they impact the role and function of the counselor. Includes the design of a guidance and counseling program for an elementary, secondary, or postsecondary institution. (Offered also as PSYC 5363.)

  • EPSY 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EPSY 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EPSY 6181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EPSY 6181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EPSY 6191 PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING

    EPSY 6191 Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities and must exhibit skills in evaluation as well. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off-campus practicum assignment. (Offered also as PSYC 6191.)

  • EPSY 6192 PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING

    EPSY 6192 Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities and must exhibit skills in evaluation as well. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off-campus practicum assignment. (Offered also as PSYC 6192.)

  • EPSY 6281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EPSY 6281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EPSY 6301 PRIN:HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    EPSY 6301 Principles of Human Development
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Intensive study and examination of literature and theory in developmental psychology as it relates to persons through the lifespan from infancy through adulthood. Social and personality development, intellectual development, language acquisition, and developmental expectations are emphasized. The unique concerns of the exceptional child are studied as well as in-depth, case-study skill development. (Offered also as PSYC 6301.)

  • EPSY 6302 MEASURE/APPRAISAL

    EPSY 6302 Measurement and Appraisal
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Principles and techniques of psychological measurement are emphasized. Major instruments are surveyed, exclusive of projective measures and individual intellectual measures. The knowledge and skills covered can apply in a variety of settings: agencies, clinics, schools, and businesses. Uses and critical evaluation of achievement, aptitude, interest, and non-projective personality tests are included, as are experiences in administering and scoring of tests, and ethical standards for uses of tests. (Offered also as PSYC 6302.)

  • EPSY 6305 INDIVIDUAL PSYC EVAL

    EPSY 6305 Individual Psychological Evaluation
    Prerequisite(s): EPSY 6302
    Review of theory underlying individual ability tests; supervised practice in test administration, scoring, and interpretation. Skills in report preparation are addressed. The Wechsler scales are emphasized. (Offered also as EDSP 6305 and PSYC 6305.)

  • EPSY 6306 CAREER INFO & COUNSELING

    EPSY 6306 Career Information and Career Counseling
    Prerequisite(s): EPSY 6302 or PSYC 6302
    Methods and processes of collecting, organizing, evaluating, and interpreting educational, occupational, and personal-social information. Theories of career development are included as well as the counselor’s role in career education. Career interest inventories and other measures are reviewed with reference to their utility in career counseling.

  • EPSY 6308 METHODS OF GROUP GUIDANCE

    EPSY 6308 Methods of Group Guidance
    Prerequisite(s): EPSY 5323
    Group aspects of student personnel and clinical work for counselors, administrators, and other professionals dealing in services where group counseling is provided. Theory and research relevant to providing group counseling to various populations are emphasized. Didactic and experiential activities are offered. (Offered also as PSYC 6308.)

  • EPSY 6310 CLINICAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

    EPSY 6310 Clinical Psychopathology
    Prerequisite(s): 24 graduate semester hours in psychology
    A course that examines the etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic methods applicable to the major psychological disorders. Emphasis is placed on being able to differentiate one disorder from the other. (Offered also as PSYC 6310.)

  • EPSY 6381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    EPSY 6381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • EPSY 6391 COUNSELING PRACTICUM

    EPSY 6391 Counseling Practicum
    Prerequisite(s): A cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 and the successful completion of 24 credit hours. The 24 credit hours are comprised of EDUC 6304, EPSY 5310, EPSY 5313, EPSY 5323, EPSY 5363, EPSY 6308, and six credit hours from any courses listed on the MEd, Counselor Education Degree Plan. All courses included in the prerequisite requirement of 24 credit hours must be passed with a grade no lower than a ‘C’.
    Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities and must exhibit skills in evaluation as well. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off-campus practicum assignment.

  • ETEC 4306 EDUC APPLICATIONS OF TECH

    ETEC 4306 Educational Applications of Technology
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation Program
    A broad spectrum of technology application is explored including the use of word processing, software evaluation, Internet use, multimedia, and telecommunications. Technology is used for communication, management, teaching, and learning. Software is reviewed and evaluated.

  • ETEC 5302 MUTLIMEDIA INSTRUCT STRAT

    ETEC 5302 Multimedia Instructional Strategies
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is part of the introductory sequence of courses designed to introduce and train educators in the appropriate applications of instructional technology. Information acquisition will focus on methodologies and appropriate use of multimedia as an instructional tool. Application of skills will focus on demonstrated proficiency in manipulation of text, graphics, and sound. Problem-solving activities will focus on the integration of multimedia programs as appropriate. Participants will complete the design and development of an individual multimedia project and a group multimedia project, using advanced technical features and multiple sources of media. Participants will learn to use multimedia tools to enhance their own communication, expand their repertoire of instructional strategies, and lead students in creating their own multimedia projects.

  • ETEC 5305 TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED DESIGN

    ETEC 5305 Technology Enhanced Instructional Design
    Prerequisite(s): ETEC 5306
    This course is designed to provide integrated and in-depth understanding of the principles and processes of technology-enhanced instructional design and curriculum development. Learning will be focused on the application of learner, instructional, and resource analyses with an emphasis on technology-enhanced resources, assessment, and computer-based curriculum management.

  • ETEC 5306 EDUC APPLICATIONS OF TECH

    ETEC 5306 Educational Applications of Technology
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A broad spectrum of technology application is explored including the use of word processing, software evaluation, Internet use, multimedia, and telecommunications. Technology is used for communication, management, teaching, and learning. Software is reviewed and evaluated.

  • ETEC 5319 INTERNET RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    ETEC 5319 Internet Resource Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Internet Resource Management is designed to allow participants to experience appropriate uses of technology as a learner, and thus better use technology in teaching and learning. The digital world can produce a management nightmare without the proper tools for resource management. The goal of this course is to provide a combination of hands-on and student-centered experiences that will assist in the management of Internet resources. These experiences will enable participants to search for information, share information, generate materials, and evaluate web-based instructional materials. Instructional strategies will focus on the acquisition, analysis, and synthesis of Internet resources that address appropriate educational needs. Graduate students will create a group of 4 inquiry based Webquest and make it available online for students.

  • ETEC 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ETEC 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ETEC 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    ETEC 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • ETEC 6307 DESIGN OF PRINT-BASED MEDIA

    ETEC 6307 Design of Print-Based Media
    Prerequisite(s): ETEC 5306
    Information acquisition activities include analysis of graphic and text layout design for various print-based media. Application competencies include creation and evaluation of documents using advanced standards and styles of publishing. Problem-solving activities will focus on matching the appropriate production software.

  • ETEC 6308 DISTANCE LEARNING

    ETEC 6308 Distance Learning
    Prerequisite(s): ETEC 5306
    Information acquisition focuses on case studies and research efforts documenting effective and ineffective applications of distance learning technologies. Application of research findings will lead to the development of a distance learning prospectus. By participating in distance learning demonstrations and simulations, students will apply and test instructional strategies appropriate for learners in a remote learning scenario. Problem-solving activities will include delivery system design and program design.

  • FINA 3315 SECURITY MARKETS AND FINANCIAL

    FINA 3315 Security Markets and Financial Institutions
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 3320
    An introduction to the US financial system. Topics include interest rate theory, financial markets such as money markets and capital markets including stock and bond markets, and financial institutions such as banks and other depository institutions, finance companies, insurance companies, investment companies, pension funds, securities firms. (Offered also as ECON 3315.)

  • FINA 3320 CORPORATE FINANCE

    FINA 3320 Corporate Finance
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2301 and BUSA 2311
    Introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and analytical techniques of financial management. Topics include financial planning and analysis, risk and return, time value of money, valuation and capital budgeting. The following key aspects of finance will be emphasized – net present value, cash flows, and the tradeoff between risk and return.

  • FINA 3322 INTRO TO RISK MANAGEMENT

    FINA 3322 Introduction to Risk Management
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 3320
    This course provides an introduction to corporate risk management by combining concepts, tools, and techniques from finance and related disciplines such as economics and statistics. It discusses the identification, measurement, and management of risk from both personal and corporate perspectives. Topics covered include how to characterize and measure risks, compare and price risk, evaluate the effects that risk has upon stakeholder incentives and firm value, etc.

  • FINA 3330 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

    FINA 3330 International Finance
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 3320 and ECON 2311
    A study of the theories and practices of international trade and finance, direction and composition of world trade, institutions for facilitating trade, international payments, capital movement, exchange rates. (Offered also as ECON 3330.)

  • FINA 4307 INVESTMENT PRINCIPLES

    FINA 4307 Investment Principles
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 3320 and ECON 2311
    An introductory investment course designed to teach students how to make investment decisions. It helps prepare students become investment professionals and financial planners. It analyzes different types of investment products and discusses the characteristics of different kinds of investors for purposes of developing an effective investment policy. Topics include debt securities, equity securities, derivative securities, security analysis, and portfolio management. The course provides the first good step for those students who are interested in obtaining the CFP (Certified Financial Planner) certification or the CFA (Charted Financial Analyst) charter.

  • FINA 4318 CORPORATE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    FINA 4318 Corporate Financial Management
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 3320 and ECON 2311
    This course will examine the theories and practice of corporate finance and provide practical solutions to the problems faced by financial managers and analysts. This course will demonstrate the problems of utilizing financial decision making tools under uncertainty, establish a framework for the analysis of financial problems, and illustrate the breadth of financial decision making.

  • FINA 4322 OPTIONS AND FUTURES

    FINA 4322 Options and Futures
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 4307
    The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of the wide range of derivative financial securities, including options and futures, and better prepare them for the types of careers available in today’s complex financial world. Students will learn how these securities are priced and used in risk management and speculative strategies by individuals and companies.

  • FINA 4330 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS/MODELING

    FINA 4330 Financial Analysis and Modeling
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 3320 and ECON 2311
    This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of financial modeling using the theories, concepts, and tools covered in FINA 3310, Corporate Finance, and FINA 4318, Corporate Financial Management. Extensive application of spreadsheet models incorporating real life financial data is used to familiarize students with the methodology in financial analysis and financial decision-making. Specific emphasis is on the interpretation of financial statements and their forecasts in support of planning, budgeting, and asset, as well as corporate, valuation objectives.

  • FINA 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    FINA 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Dean of the Dunham College of Business
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • FINA 5260 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE

    FINA 5260 Principles of Finance
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to the basic theory and tools of financial management. Topics include financial statement analysis, risk and return, time value of money, and security valuation.

  • FINA 6330 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT & POLICY

    FINA 6330 Financial Management
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 6352 and MGMT 5260 and FINA 5260
    Application of current financial analysis techniques within the firm. Topics covered include capital budgeting techniques, investment analysis, capital structure decisions, financial planning, and working capital management. The course includes review of multinational or global corporations and multinational versus domestic financial management. This course also looks at business ethics and social responsibility by firms, including agency problem, management compensation, and executive stock options. Legal aspects are considered throughout the course and involve Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), bankruptcy, reorganizations, liquidation proceedings, initial offerings (IPO’s) and mergers, leveraged buyouts (LBO’s), divestitures, and holding companies. Graduate Business programs only.

  • FINA 6332 INVESTMENTS

    FINA 6332 Investments
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 6330
    A detailed analysis of the types of investment media integrated with the basic concepts of portfolio selection, diversification, and risk management. Sophisticated investment techniques and strategy will be utilized. Graduate Business programs only.

  • FINA 6333 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

    FINA 6333 International Finance
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 6352 and MGMT 5260 and FINA 5260
    Studies of the factors that influence international financial decision making and the institutions and instruments that facilitate international trade and investment. Includes the international payments system, foreign exchange rates, and international capital movements. Graduate Business programs only.

  • FINA 6335 RISK MANAGMENT

    FINA 6335 Risk Management
    Prerequisite(s): FINA 6330
    Decision-making under uncertainty and the management of risk by corporations, recognizing the relationship between risk management and the overall goals of the firm. Emphasis is placed upon the identification, measurement and management of corporate risks. Risk exposures due to complex financial structures are also covered in this course. Graduate Business programs only.

  • FINA 6365 FINANCIAL MODELING & VALUATION

    FINA 6365 Financial Modeling and Valuation for New Ventures
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 6365
    This course focuses on the core concepts and best practices used to build sophisticated financial models for entrepreneurial ventures, including high-level scenarios analysis and valuation techniques for privately-held companies. Topics include: a) developing macros and interactive cross-tabs functions in MS-Excel spreadsheets, b) configuring multiple variables with what if scenario impacts and rationales for financial models, c) accounting risk and managing quantitative and qualitative components into the models that directly impact the decision making entrepreneurial managers, d) establishing solid metrics and sound underlying rationales for pre-money and post-money valuations of pre-public business ventures, and e) relating cash flow and operations models to changes in firm valuations.

  • FINA 6365 FINANCIAL MODELING & VALUATION

    FINA 6365 Financial Modeling and Valuation for New Ventures
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 6365
    This course focuses on the core concepts and best practices used to build sophisticated financial models for entrepreneurial ventures, including high-level scenarios analysis and valuation techniques for privately-held companies. Topics include: a) developing macros and interactive cross-tabs functions in MS-Excel spreadsheets, b) configuring multiple variables with what if scenario impacts and rationales for financial models, c) accounting risk and managing quantitative and qualitative components into the models that directly impact the decision making entrepreneurial managers, d) establishing solid metrics and sound underlying rationales for pre-money and post-money valuations of pre-public business ventures, and e) relating cash flow and operations models to changes in firm valuations.

  • FYS 1300 FRESHMAN YEAR SEMINAR

    FYS 1300 Freshman Year Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The ultimate purpose of college is student learning. The purpose of the first-year seminar is to help the new student begin exploring how to make his or her education, both in and out of the classroom, relevant and meaningful. Emphasis is on assisting the student in becoming aware of the spectrum of learning opportunities at this university, directing the student to the academic, social, cultural, recreational, and spiritual resources and opportunities to the university and teaching the new student how to effectively utilize and take part in these as a new member of the university community.

  • GOVT 2313 AMERICAN/TEXAS GOVERNMENT

    GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of the structure and operation of the national and Texas governments. This course is required for certification to teach in the public schools of Texas.

  • GOVT 2334 CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS

    GOVT 2334 Campaigns and Elections
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An analysis of the American electoral system and political campaigns. This course focuses on political parties, campaign strategy, the electoral process, public opinion, and voter turnout.

  • GOVT 2343 PUBLIC POLICY

    GOVT 2343 Public Policy
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course will examine policy issues at the national level including crime, welfare, healthcare, the environment, taxation, immigration, defense, and education. The course will not only emphasize policy content, but also will focus upon the policy process, the influence of various political personalities on shaping public policy, and policy evaluation.

  • GOVT 2350 INTRO TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE

    GOVT 2350 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide an introduction into criminal justice. It will improve one’s basic understanding of crime and the criminal justice systems and familiarize one with the key concepts and terminology utilized in the field by discussing the role of the core elements: police, courts, and corrections. It will force students to examine individual rights protected by the constitution and balance them against a community’s need for public safety and public order. It highlights the complexities of the criminal justice discipline and encourages students to think critically and employ ethical reasoning by presenting real-life examples faced by criminal justice practitioners and asking the student to balance values, criminal procedures, and the law when coming up with solutions.

  • GOVT 2360 UNDERSTANDING POLITICS

    GOVT 2360 Understanding Politics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores the purpose and function of government from both theoretical and applied perspectives. Students will read various foundational theories of government, understand different ways in which governments can be designed and implemented, and examine the working governments of countries other than the United States.

  • GOVT 3340 LEGAL ASPECTS:CRIMINAL JUSTICE

    GOVT 3340 Legal Aspects of Criminal Justice
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide an in-depth look into the aspects of law which are relevant to and essential for a better understanding of the criminal justice system and its related processes. Laws that govern policing are primarily based upon the United States Constitution, United States Supreme Court decisions, and statutes passed by the United States Congress and state legislatures. This course focuses on these sources but will present the material in a format and in language designed to meet the needs and interests of non-lawyers while preserving the meaning and content of the law as interpreted by the courts. This class will force students to examine individual rights protected by the constitution and balance them against a community’s need for public safety and public order. It highlights the complexities of the criminal justice discipline and encourages students to think critically and employ ethical reasoning by presenting real-life examples faced by criminal justice practitioners and asking the student to balance values, criminal procedures, and the law when coming up with solutions.

  • GOVT 3341 ETHICS/CRIME/CRIMINAL JUSTICE

    GOVT 3341 Ethics, Crime, and Criminal Justice
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is designed to provide a comprehensive study of ethics, crime, and criminal justice by exploring different themes and issues, including concepts such as good vs. evil, right vs. wrong, duty, obligation, virtue, freedom, rationality, and free will. The themes that ethics explores underlie many circumstances we routinely confront as individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and cultures. Ultimately, if the criminal justice aim of ethics is realized, the student will be equipped to adopt more informed beliefs, to make better decisions, to undertake healthier actions, to be a better citizen, and consequently, to live a more rewarding and fulfilling life in the United States or any country on earth. The study into criminal justice ethics concludes by discussing why faith matters and how it could matter more.

  • GOVT 3342 FOUNDATIONS OF CRIMINAL LAW

    GOVT 3342 Foundations of Criminal Law
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course will focus on introducing students to the substantive criminal law and the criminal justice system. The course will include a treatment of the origin of laws, the penal code, the definition of law and crime, general principles of criminal responsibility, elements of major crimes, punishments, conditions or circumstances which may excuse one from criminal responsibility or mitigate punishment, and introduce students to the court system. Although the course will familiarize students with federal criminal law, the main emphasis will be on the penal laws of Texas (Texas Penal Code).

  • GOVT 3344 THE AMERICAN COURT SYSTEM

    GOVT 3344 The American Court System
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Survey of state and federal court systems, the U.S. Supreme Court, introduction to civil and criminal law, the role of lawyers, judges, and juries in the American court system. This course is basic to pre-law.

  • GOVT 3345 ANCIENT/MEDIEVAL THOUGHT

    GOVT 3345 Ancient and Medieval Political Thought
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An examination of classic dilemmas and recurrent problems in political theory and how they are dealt with by ancient Greek, Roman, and feudal thinkers. This course will focus on the original writings of philosophers who have made a substantial contribution to political theory, from Plato to Machiavelli.

  • GOVT 3348 AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT

    GOVT 3348 American Political Thought
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course covers American political thought from the colonial experience, the Revolution, the drafting of the Constitution, the Civil War, the Civil Rights movement, to the present – an analysis of ideas that shaped the American political system.

  • GOVT 3353 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THOUGHT

    GOVT 3353 Contemporary Political Thought
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the major political doctrines of the present day, with primary emphasis upon Marxism, Fascism, and the doctrines of the modern democratic state.

  • GOVT 3374 UNITED STATES CONGRESS

    GOVT 3374 The United States Congress
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An analysis of the institutional behavior, procedures, and organization of Congress. Special attention paid to the roles of representatives, senators, lobbyists, and the legislative process.

  • GOVT 3384 THE PRESIDENCY

    GOVT 3384 The Presidency
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Analysis of the nation’s chief executive, including the origins of the office, electoral process, powers and duties of the office, organization and staffing of the White House, and influence on national and world politics.

  • GOVT 3390 LAW & JUSTICE:GREAT TRIALS

    GOVT 3390 Law and Justice: Great Trials of the Western Legal Tradition
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An analysis of the great trials that shaped the Western legal tradition, from ancient Athens to contemporary America. This course focuses on the formation and justification of three principles of justice (reason, autonomy, and consent) which define the natural law jurisprudence underlying the legal and governmental institutions of England and the United States. This course also examines the horrific consequences of abandoning these principles of justice in three 20th century legal systems: the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany, and the United States.

  • GOVT 3394 LAW AND RELIGION IN THE US

    GOVT 3394 Law and Religion in the United States
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides the historical background for the development of the separation of church and state and the subsequent development of secularism. Law and religion is designed to teach students to think in sophisticated ways about religious liberty and the interaction of religion and politics.

  • GOVT 4310 JURISPRUDENCE/LAW/LEGAL THEORY

    GOVT 4310 Jurisprudence, Law, and Legal Theory
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course presents an introduction to jurisprudence. It surveys (1) the rudiments of the common law system, (2) the existence conditions (essential elements) of law, and (3) what determines the legal validity (enforceability) of law. These issues necessarily involve a number of fundamental philosophical issues, including: 1) the appropriate relationship between law and morality, 2) the appropriate relationship of the individual to the state, and the appropriate limits and boundaries of governmental coercion, 3) the nature of justice, and the principles of reason, autonomy, and consent, 4) the relationship between individual liberty and the protection of property, freedom of expression, and freedom of religious belief and practice., 5) the appropriate limits and boundaries of judicial discretion, and 6) constitutional interpretation. The course also addresses important substantive issues of tort law, property law, contract law, and constitutional law. The course concludes by examining the recent emergence of the economic approach to law, a judicial philosophy that evaluates the morality of law by its ability to generate profits. (This course will be included in the Political Theory Option of the degree plan.)

  • GOVT 4313 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

    GOVT 4313 Constitutional Law
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Constitutional Law I focuses on the Bill of Rights (Amendments I through X) and the Civil War Amendments (Amendments XIII through XV). The course focuses on the historical events that led to the adoption of each Amendment and the major United States Supreme Court cases interpreting and applying each Amendment. This course focuses on the Constitution’s guarantees of political liberty, the Constitution’s requirements in criminal procedure, and the United States Supreme Court’s expansion of federal power over private and state action through substantive due process and incorporation under Amendment XIV.

  • GOVT 4314 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II

    GOVT 4314 Constitutional Law II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is a continuation of the study of judicial review, the political role of the courts, American federalism, the jurisdiction of and the limitations of the judicial branch, the power of taxation, the commerce power, the substantive and procedural rights of the individual, and the powers of the President that began in GOVT 4313, Constitutional Law I. Students will explore each of these dimensions of constitutional law in more depth and learn to analyze and evaluate current legislation and legal decisions of the legislative and judicial branches of government.

  • GOVT 4333 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY

    GOVT 4333 United States Foreign Policy
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of the foundation of foreign policy and the major diplomatic developments from the founding period to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the means and methods by which United States foreign policy is formulated and executed.

  • GOVT 4343 INTELLIGENCE/NATIONAL SECURITY

    GOVT 4343 Intelligence and National Security
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An analysis of the role played by the American intelligence community (CIA, NSA, DIA, etc.) in the assessment and realization of U.S. national security interests, with special attention to methods, duties, and prerogatives of the various agencies that make up the intelligence community.

  • GOVT 4353 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

    GOVT 4353 International Relations
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of contemporary international political conditions. Along with the analysis of the forces and pressures behind contemporary events, the principles, origin, and development of international law and international organizations will be given consideration.

  • GOVT 4363 LATIN AMER:REVOLUTIONS/REFORM

    GOVT 4363 Political Economy of Latin America: Revolutions, Reform, and Resistance
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores the political dynamics involved in economic decision-making and action in contemporary Latin America. In examining the relationship between politics and economics in the region, the course will focus on issues of dependency and development, neo-liberalism, authoritarian rule and transition to democracy, and religious and social mobilization in revolution.

  • GOVT 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    GOVT 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor and dean of the college/school.
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • GOVT 4383 INTERNSHIP IN GOVERNMENT

    GOVT 4383 Internship in Political Science
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor
    Directed work experience in a variety of public and private organizations. The primary objective of this course is to provide students with opportunities to apply what they have learned in class in a career-oriented setting. Also provides students with the opportunity to attain applied research experience and develop analytic skills.

  • GOVT 4392 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROJECT

    GOVT 4392 Independent Research Project
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • GREK 2312 GREEK GRAMMAR I

    GREK 2312 Greek Grammar I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to the forms, vocabulary, and grammatical usage of the Koine Greek, designed to give the student the tools necessary for translation and analysis of the Greek New Testament.

  • GREK 2322 GREEK GRAMMAR II

    GREK 2322 Greek Grammar
    Prerequisite(s): GREK 2312
    A continuation of GREK 2312. An introduction to additional forms, vocabulary, and grammatical usage of Koine Greek designed to give the student the skills necessary for translation and analysis of the Greek New Testament.

  • GREK 2381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    GREK 2381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • GREK 3311 GREEK READING AND SYNTAX I

    GREK 3311 Greek Syntax and Reading I
    Prerequisite(s): GREK 2312 and GREK 2322
    An intermediate study of Greek syntax with application to the translation and analysis of the Greek New Testament.

  • GREK 4351 GREEK READING/SYNTAX II

    GREK 4351 Greek Reading and Syntax II
    Prerequisite(s): GREK 2312 and GREK 2322 and GREK 3311
    Advanced study of Greek syntax with application to the translation and analysis of the Greek New Testament.

  • GREK 4352 DIRECTED STUDIES IN GREEK

    GREK 4352 Directed Studies in Greek
    Prerequisite(s): GREK 2312 and GREK 2322 and GREK 3311 and GREK 4351
    Advanced study of Greek literature of the Koine period. This course may not be repeated more than twice.

  • GREK 5301 GREEK I

    GREK 5301 Greek I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Greek I is a study of Koine Greek grammar and syntax for reading the Greek New Testament and selected extrabiblical literature.

  • GREK 5302 GREEK II

    GREK 5302 Greek II
    Prerequisite(s): GREK 5301
    Greek II is an advanced study of Koine Greek grammar and syntax for reading and exegesis of the Greek New Testament and other selected literature.

  • GREK 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    GREK 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • GREK 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    GREK 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • GREK 6301 GREEK STUDIES I

    GREK 6301 Greek Studies I
    Prerequisite(s): GREK 5301 and GREK 5302
    Introductory studies in Greek grammar and syntax of select literature of the Koine period.

  • GREK 6303 GREEK STUDIES II

    GREK 6303 Greek Studies II
    Prerequisite(s): GREK 6301
    Intermediate studies in Greek grammar, syntax and linguistic approaches to select literature of the Koine period.

  • GREK 6351 GREEK STUDIES III

    GREK 6351 Greek Studies III
    Prerequisite(s): GREK 6303
    Advanced studies in Greek grammar, syntax, and linguistic approaches to literature of the Koine Period.

  • GREK 6352 ADV DIRECTED STUDIES IN GREEK

    GREK 6352 Advanced Directed Studies in Greek
    Prerequisite(s): GREK 6351
    Advanced studies in Greek grammar, syntax, linguistic approaches, and/or text critical theories with application to literature of the Koine Period. Course may be repeated as course content differs.

  • HADM 6010 ORIENTATION

    HADM 6010 Orientation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is a one-to-two hour introduction and overview of the Master of Healthcare Administration program, an introduction of professors, and an overview of the portfolio required for graduation. Students are also required to complete the Peregrine Health Administration Competence Examination (additional fee required).

  • HADM 6010 ORIENTATION

    HADM 6010 Orientation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course is a one-to-two hour introduction and overview of the Master of Healthcare Administration program, an introduction of professors, and an overview of the portfolio required for graduation. Students are also required to complete the Peregrine Health Administration Competence Examination (additional fee required).

  • HADM 6090 POROTFLIO DEFENS/COMPTNCY EXAM

    HADM 6090 Portfolio Defense and Competency Exam
    Prerequisite(s): HADM 6010 and HADM 6301 and HADM 6302 and HADM 6303 and HADM 6304 and HADM 6305 and HADM 6306 and HADM 6307 and HADM 6308 and HADM 6309 and HADM 6311 and HADM 6312 and HADM 6313 and HADM 6314 and MGMT 6390 and MKTG 6310 and MGMT 6338
    This course is established for students to present an oral defense of their portfolios to demonstrate their competency in measured areas of the degree program. Students will present their portfolio defense to an oral board comprised of faculty from the Healthcare Administration Program and/or the Dunham College of Business. Students are also required to complete the Peregrine Health Administration Competency Examination (additional fee required).

  • HADM 6090 POROTFLIO DEFENS/COMPTNCY EXAM

    HADM 6090 Portfolio Defense and Competency Exam
    Prerequisite(s): HADM 6010 and HADM 6301 and HADM 6302 and HADM 6303 and HADM 6304 and HADM 6305 and HADM 6306 and HADM 6307 and HADM 6308 and HADM 6309 and HADM 6311 and HADM 6312 and HADM 6313 and HADM 6314 and MGMT 6390 and MKTG 6310 and MGMT 6338
    This course is established for students to present an oral defense of their portfolios to demonstrate their competency in measured areas of the degree program. Students will present their portfolio defense to an oral board comprised of faculty from the Healthcare Administration Program and/or the Dunham College of Business. Students are also required to complete the Peregrine Health Administration Competency Examination (additional fee required).

  • HADM 6301 HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENT

    HADM 6301 Health Services Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course analyzes current issues facing healthcare leaders. The course examines the competencies (knowledge, skills, attributes, and behaviors) health services leaders need to thrive in a complex health system. Students will build their business skills, knowledge, and communication skills by analyzing commentaries, case studies, trends, and policies to improve decision-making and transformation.

  • HADM 6301 HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENT

    HADM 6301 Health Services Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    The course analyzes current issues facing healthcare leaders. The course examines the competencies (knowledge, skills, attributes, and behaviors) health services leaders need to thrive in a complex health system. Students will build their business skills, knowledge, and communication skills by analyzing commentaries, case studies, trends, and policies to improve decision-making and transformation.

  • HADM 6302 THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE

    HADM 6302 The Patient Experience
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course discusses and analyzes strategies and improvement opportunities on how to provide better care, improve wellness, and achieve better quality of life of patients and families. The patient’s perspective, community resources, and the environment will be discussed. The course will explore how to improve the patient experience (quality, safety, service) and strategies to integrate community health systems such as public health, long term care, home health, hospice care, primary and pastoral care, and mental health.

  • HADM 6302 THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE

    HADM 6302 The Patient Experience
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course discusses and analyzes strategies and improvement opportunities on how to provide better care, improve wellness, and achieve better quality of life of patients and families. The patient’s perspective, community resources, and the environment will be discussed. The course will explore how to improve the patient experience (quality, safety, service) and strategies to integrate community health systems such as public health, long term care, home health, hospice care, primary and pastoral care, and mental health.

  • HADM 6303 APPLIED QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    HADM 6303 Applied Quantitative Analysis for Health Services Managers
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT 5260 or undergraduate equivalent
    This course applies the concepts and techniques on how to improve critical thinking and decision-making business skills. The course will provide models, problems or scenarios to help students make evidence based decisions. Examples include epidemiology studies, chronic disease service development, health insurance rate setting, risk management, bio statistical analysis of trends, continuous quality improvement tools, and market analysis. Group dynamics and communication skills in the context of decision-making will be highlighted.

  • HADM 6303 APPLIED QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    HADM 6303 Applied Quantitative Analysis for Health Services Managers
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT 5260 or undergraduate equivalent
    This course applies the concepts and techniques on how to improve critical thinking and decision-making business skills. The course will provide models, problems or scenarios to help students make evidence based decisions. Examples include epidemiology studies, chronic disease service development, health insurance rate setting, risk management, bio statistical analysis of trends, continuous quality improvement tools, and market analysis. Group dynamics and communication skills in the context of decision-making will be highlighted.

  • HADM 6304 MANAGERIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    HADM 6304 Managerial Epidemiology
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT 5260 or undergraduate equivalent
    The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the public health system and skills of epidemiology. It explains how to use epidemiological concepts and tools to analyze social determinants of health, identify the impact of chronic disease conditions, and develop population health services. The course covers topics such as Incidence, prevalence, risk, morbidity, mortality, peidemic, endemic, and pandemic outbreaks. Case studies are applied regarding methods of descriptive epidemiology, measurement, and cost-effective analysis.

  • HADM 6304 MANAGERIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    HADM 6304 Managerial Epidemiology
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT 5260 or undergraduate equivalent
    The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the public health system and skills of epidemiology. It explains how to use epidemiological concepts and tools to analyze social determinants of health, identify the impact of chronic disease conditions, and develop population health services. The course covers topics such as Incidence, prevalence, risk, morbidity, mortality, peidemic, endemic, and pandemic outbreaks. Case studies are applied regarding methods of descriptive epidemiology, measurement, and cost-effective analysis.

  • HADM 6305 LEGAL & ETHICAL ESSENTIALS

    HADM 6305 Legal and Ethical Essentials of Healthcare Administration
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course applies common legal and ethical issues the practitioner will face during his or her career. The course will cover the U.S. legal system, terminology, processes, summaries of case law, and legal system issues relative to healthcare administration. This course introduces the concepts of contracts and intentional torts, negligence, corporate structure and governance, liability of healthcare organizations, medical staff privileges, competition and anti-trust law, fraud, and corporate compliance. Key features include: employee rights and responsibilities, end of life issues, religious ethics, organizational ethics, medical staff ethics, disruptive physicians, human genetics, and the current status of the Affordable Care Act.

  • HADM 6305 LEGAL & ETHICAL ESSENTIALS

    HADM 6305 Legal and Ethical Essentials of Healthcare Administration
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course applies common legal and ethical issues the practitioner will face during his or her career. The course will cover the U.S. legal system, terminology, processes, summaries of case law, and legal system issues relative to healthcare administration. This course introduces the concepts of contracts and intentional torts, negligence, corporate structure and governance, liability of healthcare organizations, medical staff privileges, competition and anti-trust law, fraud, and corporate compliance. Key features include: employee rights and responsibilities, end of life issues, religious ethics, organizational ethics, medical staff ethics, disruptive physicians, human genetics, and the current status of the Affordable Care Act.

  • HADM 6306 LEADERSHIP & TEAMBUILDING

    HADM 6306 Strategic Healthcare Leadership and Teambuilding
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course covers how leaders will lead their organizations in a volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous health care environment. It will advance a health enterprise leadership, teambuilding, and change management model as means to find opportunities in the maze of legislative, economic, demographic, clinical, information management, and political changes. Students will develop a personalized leadership philosophy and development plan to improve their leadership, communication, facilitation, and negotiation skills.

  • HADM 6306 LEADERSHIP & TEAMBUILDING

    HADM 6306 Strategic Healthcare Leadership and Teambuilding
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course covers how leaders will lead their organizations in a volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous health care environment. It will advance a health enterprise leadership, teambuilding, and change management model as means to find opportunities in the maze of legislative, economic, demographic, clinical, information management, and political changes. Students will develop a personalized leadership philosophy and development plan to improve their leadership, communication, facilitation, and negotiation skills.

  • HADM 6307 MEDICAL GRP PRACTICE MGMT

    HADM 6307 Medical Group Practice Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course addresses the spectrum of management issues facing medical practices. The course covers topics such as practice operations and functions, monitoring and controlling physician organizations, and essential knowledge for contemporary management. Students will engage issues pertaining to general practice operations, the organization of medical groups, physician leadership, nursing leadership, governance, accounting, benchmarking techniques, and physician contracts.

  • HADM 6307 MEDICAL GRP PRACTICE MGMT

    HADM 6307 Medical Group Practice Management
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course addresses the spectrum of management issues facing medical practices. The course covers topics such as practice operations and functions, monitoring and controlling physician organizations, and essential knowledge for contemporary management. Students will engage issues pertaining to general practice operations, the organization of medical groups, physician leadership, nursing leadership, governance, accounting, benchmarking techniques, and physician contracts.

  • HADM 6308 HEALTH INFORMATICS

    HADM 6308 Health Informatics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Students will have the opportunity to develop competencies to prepare for participation and leadership in information technology strategy development, decision-making, effective implementation and adoption of information technology such as electronic health records, secure messaging, and telemedicine. The course covers issues such as bioinformatics, privacy and security of patient data, medical terminologies, communication, the types of healthcare information systems used in healthcare, and how these systems affect clinical decision-making. Students will learn skills associated with the evaluation, implementation, and support of information systems such as electronic health record (EHR) and clinical decision support systems. Students will assess concepts associated with data mining and leverage data analytics towards quality and operational improvement.

  • HADM 6308 HEALTH INFORMATICS

    HADM 6308 Health Informatics
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Students will have the opportunity to develop competencies to prepare for participation and leadership in information technology strategy development, decision-making, effective implementation and adoption of information technology such as electronic health records, secure messaging, and telemedicine. The course covers issues such as bioinformatics, privacy and security of patient data, medical terminologies, communication, the types of healthcare information systems used in healthcare, and how these systems affect clinical decision-making. Students will learn skills associated with the evaluation, implementation, and support of information systems such as electronic health record (EHR) and clinical decision support systems. Students will assess concepts associated with data mining and leverage data analytics towards quality and operational improvement.

  • HADM 6309 HEALTHCARE FINANCE

    HADM 6309 Healthcare Finance
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 5362 or FINA 5260
    This course emphasizes financial management and financial operations theory, principles, and concepts as they relate to health care organizational decision-making and accountability. Students will apply current leadership principles to analyze health care delivery and financing challenges, assess customer base and facility mission to effectively manage and allocate human, financial and information resources in health organizations, and analyze health data to make data driven decisions in organizational policy and procedure.

  • HADM 6309 HEALTHCARE FINANCE

    HADM 6309 Healthcare Finance
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 5362 or FINA 5260
    This course emphasizes financial management and financial operations theory, principles, and concepts as they relate to health care organizational decision-making and accountability. Students will apply current leadership principles to analyze health care delivery and financing challenges, assess customer base and facility mission to effectively manage and allocate human, financial and information resources in health organizations, and analyze health data to make data driven decisions in organizational policy and procedure.

  • HADM 6311 HEALTHCA ECONOMICS & INSURANCE

    HADM 6311 Healthcare Economics and Insurance
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 5363
    The course integrates population-based health economics, insurance, and traditional health economics to help students make evidence based decisions. The principles of needs, supply, demand, pricing, regulation, consumerism, profitability, and risk will be discussed using healthcare case study scenarios. Students will analyze the relationships between elements of the supply and demand of health services, effects of changes of inputs or behaviors, utilization and cost management, and the effects of moral hazard or adverse selection.

  • HADM 6311 HEALTHCA ECONOMICS & INSURANCE

    HADM 6311 Healthcare Economics and Insurance
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 5363
    The course integrates population-based health economics, insurance, and traditional health economics to help students make evidence based decisions. The principles of needs, supply, demand, pricing, regulation, consumerism, profitability, and risk will be discussed using healthcare case study scenarios. Students will analyze the relationships between elements of the supply and demand of health services, effects of changes of inputs or behaviors, utilization and cost management, and the effects of moral hazard or adverse selection.

  • HADM 6312 REVENUE CYCLE & REIMBURSEMNT

    HADM 6312 Revenue Cycle and Value-Based Reimbursement
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 5362 or FINA 5260
    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to healthcare revenue cycle components such as management of patient financial services, health information management for revenue cycle managers, managed care contracting and reimbursement issues, and accounting for patient financial service professionals. Students will also learn how to create systems and processes that help to leverage data and propel an organization’s transition to value-based care without being overwhelmed by the data. Students will learn valuable details on issues such as: using patient-reported measures to capture data that matter to patients, implementing shared decision-making and improving the patient experience, employing fast and frugal cost-allocation techniques, harnessing variation to spark process improvement, evaluating the effectiveness of transformation efforts in the real world, creating a governance and oversight structure to promote rapid organizational learning, identifying the patients with the greatest ability to improve.

  • HADM 6312 REVENUE CYCLE & REIMBURSEMNT

    HADM 6312 Revenue Cycle and Value-Based Reimbursement
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 5362 or FINA 5260
    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to healthcare revenue cycle components such as management of patient financial services, health information management for revenue cycle managers, managed care contracting and reimbursement issues, and accounting for patient financial service professionals. Students will also learn how to create systems and processes that help to leverage data and propel an organization’s transition to value-based care without being overwhelmed by the data. Students will learn valuable details on issues such as: using patient-reported measures to capture data that matter to patients, implementing shared decision-making and improving the patient experience, employing fast and frugal cost-allocation techniques, harnessing variation to spark process improvement, evaluating the effectiveness of transformation efforts in the real world, creating a governance and oversight structure to promote rapid organizational learning, identifying the patients with the greatest ability to improve.

  • HADM 6313 QUALITY SAFETY RISK MGMT

    HADM 6313 Quality, Safety, Risk Management, and High Reliability Healthcare
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course applies a systems approach to create high reliability health organizations (HRO) dedicated to increasing patient safety, preventing harm, and delivering value based care. Students will be introduced to a diverse set of CQI tools, methods, and metrics such as Lean/Six Sigma, TEAMStePPS, and leadership strategies for creating a culture high reliability. Students will analyze cases on how to achieve the Institute of Medicine’s goals to make healthcare safer, timely, effective, accountable, efficient, and patient-centered.

  • HADM 6313 QUALITY SAFETY RISK MGMT

    HADM 6313 Quality, Safety, Risk Management, and High Reliability Healthcare
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course applies a systems approach to create high reliability health organizations (HRO) dedicated to increasing patient safety, preventing harm, and delivering value based care. Students will be introduced to a diverse set of CQI tools, methods, and metrics such as Lean/Six Sigma, TEAMStePPS, and leadership strategies for creating a culture high reliability. Students will analyze cases on how to achieve the Institute of Medicine’s goals to make healthcare safer, timely, effective, accountable, efficient, and patient-centered.

  • HADM 6314 FOUNDATIONS IN GLOBAL HEALTH

    HADM 6314 Foundations in Global Health
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to key topics, concepts and methods in global health, examining determinants of complex issues, and exploring multidimensional approaches and interventions. This course addresses and analyzes differences in health status and methods of organizing and providing health services in countries with varying levels of development and types of socio-political systems. Students develop an understanding of the various avenues of international cooperation in health.

  • HADM 6314 FOUNDATIONS IN GLOBAL HEALTH

    HADM 6314 Foundations in Global Health
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to key topics, concepts and methods in global health, examining determinants of complex issues, and exploring multidimensional approaches and interventions. This course addresses and analyzes differences in health status and methods of organizing and providing health services in countries with varying levels of development and types of socio-political systems. Students develop an understanding of the various avenues of international cooperation in health.

  • HCAD 5301 EPIDEMIOLOGY/POPULATION HLTH

    HCAD 5301 Trends in Epidemiology and Population Health
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Study of epidemiology as the diagnostic of population health. Included are understanding of epidemiologic situations, risk, and evaluation of health problems and health policies.

  • HCAD 5302 LEGAL & ETHICAL ISSUES

    HCAD 5302 Legal and Ethical Issues in Healthcare Administration
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Study of legal and ethical issues in healthcare administration including torts, contract law, malpractice, regulations, and records management.

  • HCAD 5303 APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS

    HCAD 5303 Applied Research Methods in Healthcare Administration
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Study of evidenced based research and outcomes of healthcare situations identified from students’ professional experience.

  • HCAD 5305 MGMT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    HCAD 5305 Management Information Systems in Healthcare
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Study of healthcare applications including electronic medical records, performance management, compensation administration, governmental reporting, payroll and benefits administration. Topics also include defining technology needs based on business requirements, selecting technology vendors, outsourcing and preparing cost/benefit analyses.

  • HCAD 5307 QUALITY & CONTINUOUS IMPROV

    HCAD 5307 Quality and Continuous Improvement in Healthcare
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Study concepts of value-based learning, HCA-HPS, quality, service, mortality. Includes concepts and practices of quality assessment, control and improvement, and accreditation and outcome analysis in service delivery systems.

  • HCAD 5308 PRINCIPLES HEALTHCARE DELIVERY

    HCAD 5308 Principles of Healthcare Delivery
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Discussion of Healthcare delivery, theories of organization assessment, and patient satisfaction indicators.

  • HCAD 5309 HEALTHCARE OPERATIONS

    HCAD 5309 Healthcare Operations
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Discussion of tactical and operational decisions by healthcare operations managers. System based approach to the healthcare environment, analytical tools are examined to aid problem solving and decision making in healthcare organizations.

  • HCAD 5310 FINANCIAL MGMT IN HEALTHCARE

    HCAD 5310 Financial Management in Healthcare
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Introduction to the purpose and methods of finance methods including for-profit and government organizations, function of the finance department, and special industry characteristics affecting financial management. Students gain an understanding of the use of accounting information in organizations.

  • HCAD 5311 LEADERSHIP & ADMINISTRATION

    HCAD 5311 Leadership and Administration in Healthcare
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Students are introduced to the attitudes, practices, and skills necessary for effective health services leadership with an emphasis on entry-level and middle managers.

  • HCAD 5312 PRACTICUM IN HEALTHCARE ADMIN

    HCAD 5312 Practicum in Healthcare Administration
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Minimum 6 credit hours. Based on the knowledge, skills, and abilities gained and developed in the core health administration course work and experience. The practicum is designed to assess student attainment of program competencies. Program Director must approve location and student role.

  • HEBR 2312 HEBREW GRAMMAR I

    HEBR 2312 Hebrew Grammar I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to the forms, vocabulary, and grammatical usage of biblical Hebrew designed to give the student the skills necessary for the translation and analysis of the Hebrew Bible.

  • HEBR 2322 HEBREW GRAMMAR II

    HEBR 2322 Hebrew Grammar II
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 2312
    A continuation of HEBR 2312. An introduction to additional forms, vocabulary, and grammatical usage of biblical Hebrew designed to give the student the skills necessary for the translation and analysis of the Hebrew Bible.

  • HEBR 2381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HEBR 2381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisites: None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HEBR 2381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HEBR 2381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisites: None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HEBR 3311 HEBREW READING AND SYNTAX I

    HEBR 3311 Hebrew Reading and Syntax I
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 2312 and HEBR 2322
    An intermediate study of Hebrew syntax with application to the translation and analysis of selected portions of the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature.

  • HEBR 4351 HEBREW READING/SYNTAX II

    HEBR 4351 Hebrew Reading and Syntax II
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 2312 and HEBR 2322
    Advanced study of Hebrew syntax with application to the translation of selected portions of the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature.

  • HEBR 4352 DIRECTED STUDIES IN HEBREW

    HEBR 4352 Directed Studies in Hebrew
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 3311 and HEBR 4351
    Advanced study of the Hebrew Bible and/or selected Second Temple literature. This course may not be repeated more than twice.

  • HEBR 4393 SENIOR SEMINAR

    HEBR 4393 Senior Seminar
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 2312 and HEBR 2322 and HEBR 3311 and HEBR 4351
    Directed studies in the Hebrew Bible and other Second Temple literature.

  • HEBR 5301 HEBREW I

    HEBR 5301 Hebrew I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Hebrew I is a study of Hebrew grammar and syntax for reading the Hebrew Bible and other Second Temple literature.

  • HEBR 5302 HEBREW II

    HEBR 5302 Hebrew II
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 5301
    Hebrew II is an advanced study of Hebrew grammar and syntax for reading the Hebrew Bible and other Second Temple literature.

  • HEBR 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HEBR 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HEBR 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HEBR 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HEBR 6301 HEBREW STUDIES I

    HEBR 6301 Hebrew Studies I
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 5301 and HEBR 5302
    Introductory studies in Hebrew grammar and syntax of select literature of the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple period.

  • HEBR 6303 HEBREW STUDIES II

    HEBR 6303 Hebrew Studies II
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 6301
    Intermediate studies in Hebrew grammar, syntax, and linguistic approaches with application to select readings from the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature.

  • HEBR 6351 HEBREW STUDIES III

    HEBR 6351 Hebrew Studies III
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 6303
    Advanced studies in Hebrew grammar, syntax, and linguistic approaches with application to select readings from the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature.

  • HEBR 6352 ADV DIRECTED STUDIES IN HEBREW

    HEBR 6352 Advanced Directed Studies in Hebrew
    Prerequisite(s): HEBR 6351
    Advanced studies in Hebrew grammar, syntax, linguistic approaches, and/or text critical theories with application to literature of the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature. Course may be repeated as course content differs.

  • HIED 5301 HIST & PHILOSOPHY OF HIGHER ED

    HIED 5301 History and Philosophy of Higher Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the development of American higher education against the background of influential social, political, economic, and intellectual issues.

  • HIED 5301 HIST & PHILOSOPHY OF HIGHER ED

    HIED 5301 History and Philosophy of Higher Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the development of American higher education against the background of influential social, political, economic, and intellectual issues.

  • HIED 5302 COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY ADMIN

    HIED 5302 College and University Administration
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction of the various types of institutions of higher education, their organization and roles on a national scope. The principal administrative functions, including faculty personnel, business management, public relations, and the liaisons of student personnel with other administrative functions will be discussed.

  • HIED 5302 COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY ADMIN

    HIED 5302 College and University Administration
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction of the various types of institutions of higher education, their organization and roles on a national scope. The principal administrative functions, including faculty personnel, business management, public relations, and the liaisons of student personnel with other administrative functions will be discussed.

  • HIED 5303 LEGAL ASPECTS & FINANCE IN ED

    HIED 5303 Legal Aspects and Finance in Higher Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course analyzes case law on issues of access, student rights, employment, church and state, private sector, liability, academic freedom, and civil rights. Additionally, this course examines revenue, fund-raising and development, types of expenditures, tuition and financial aid policies, budgeting and accounting practices.

  • HIED 5303 LEGAL ASPECTS & FINANCE IN ED

    HIED 5303 Legal Aspects and Finance in Higher Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course analyzes case law on issues of access, student rights, employment, church and state, private sector, liability, academic freedom, and civil rights. Additionally, this course examines revenue, fund-raising and development, types of expenditures, tuition and financial aid policies, budgeting and accounting practices.

  • HIED 5304 INTRO TO STUDENT AFFAIRS WORK

    HIED 5304 Introduction to Student Affairs Work
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to the basic functions and professional issues in student affairs work. Relevant concepts of administration, enrollment management, student development theory, and spiritual development are introduced. The functions of and relationships between various student services departments are also discussed.

  • HIED 5304 INTRO TO STUDENT AFFAIRS WORK

    HIED 5304 Introduction to Student Affairs Work
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An introduction to the basic functions and professional issues in student affairs work. Relevant concepts of administration, enrollment management, student development theory, and spiritual development are introduced. The functions of and relationships between various student services departments are also discussed.

  • HIED 5305 CHRISTIAN COLLEGES & UNIVERSTS

    HIED 5305 Christian Colleges and Universities
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the most salient aspects of Christian colleges and universities. Specifically, students will have the opportunity to ascertain the distinctiveness of member institutions of the Christian College Collation (CCCU) and the International Association of Baptist Colleges and Universities (IABCU).

  • HIED 5305 CHRISTIAN COLLEGES & UNIVERSTS

    HIED 5305 Christian Colleges and Universities
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the most salient aspects of Christian colleges and universities. Specifically, students will have the opportunity to ascertain the distinctiveness of member institutions of the Christian College Collation (CCCU) and the International Association of Baptist Colleges and Universities (IABCU).

  • HIED 5306 PRACTICUM IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    HIED 5306 Practicum in Higher Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Practical application of learning and skills developed during course work by serving in a particular higher education department/office. This is to be completed toward the end of the student’s program of study.

  • HIED 5306 PRACTICUM IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    HIED 5306 Practicum in Higher Education
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Practical application of learning and skills developed during course work by serving in a particular higher education department/office. This is to be completed toward the end of the student’s program of study.

  • HIED 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HIED 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HIED 5381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HIED 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HIST 2311 WESTERN CIVILIZATION I

    HIST 2311 Western Civilization I
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of Western Civilization from the Ancient World to the end of the Middle Ages in Europe.

  • HIST 2312 WESTERN CIVILIZATION II

    HIST 2312 Western Civilization II
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of Western Civilization from the Renaissance and Reformation to the present.

  • HIST 2313 U S HISTORY TO 1877

    HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of American history from its origins to the close of Reconstruction.

  • HIST 2323 U S HISTORY FROM 1877

    HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey of American history from the close of Reconstruction to the present.

  • HIST 3303 THE HISTORIAN’S CRAFT

    HIST 3303 The Historian’s Craft
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the study of history. It will focus on the basic tools of historical research and writing, the philosophical implications of historical study, and the role of the Christian historian.

  • HIST 3303 THE HISTORIAN’S CRAFT

    HIST 3303 The Historian’s Craft
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the study of history. It will focus on the basic tools of historical research and writing, the philosophical implications of historical study, and the role of the Christian historian.

  • HIST 3311 AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY

    HIST 3311 American Religious History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course covers the history of American religion from the pre-contact period to the present.

  • HIST 3313 COLONIAL AMERICA

    HIST 3313 Colonial America
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course covers the history of colonial North America, from the first European settlements in the sixteenth century to the end of Spanish rule in northern New Spain in 1821. The primary focus is on the regions that later become part of the United States.

  • HIST 3314 REVOLUTIONARY/EARLY NATL AMER

    HIST 3314 Revolutionary and Early National America
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the causes and consequences of the American Revolution and the development of the United States between 1763 and 1789.

  • HIST 3323 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION

    HIST 3323 Civil War and Reconstruction
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the rise of sectionalism, the abolition crusade, the secession crisis, United States versus Confederate States, aftermath of the war, reconstruction, economic and social consequences of the war, and emergence of a New South.

  • HIST 3333 HISTORY OF TEXAS

    HIST 3333 History of Texas
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A survey course from the period of exploration and early colonization to the present. It includes the struggle for independence, the Civil War in Texas, and the growth of the state into an industrialized, urbanized society.

  • HIST 3345 HISTORY OF MODERN MEXICO

    HIST 3345 History of Modern Mexico
    Prerequisites: None
    This survey course examines the modern history of Mexico from independence (1821) to the present.

  • HIST 3345 HISTORY OF MODERN MEXICO

    HIST 3345 History of Modern Mexico
    Prerequisites: None
    This survey course examines the modern history of Mexico from independence (1821) to the present.

  • HIST 3354 HISTORY OF BRITAIN I – TO 1688

    HIST 3354 History of Britain I – To 1688
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This class focuses on the origins and development of the political, social, and cultural institutions in the British Isles and extends from the Roman era to 1688.

  • HIST 3364 HIST OF BRITAIN II – FROM 1688

    HIST 3364 History of Britain II – From 1688
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This class focuses on the development of the political, social, and cultural institutions in the British Isles from the Glorious Revolution to the present.

  • HIST 3375 GREAT TEXTS IN HISTORY

    HIST 3375 Great Texts in History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to a variety of ideas, methods, and texts, and the kinds of genres and sources that compose historical studies. Emphasis is placed on the Great Books of the Western Tradition and other key historical texts that are important to the discipline. Students may repeat this course with each new concentration of focus, in consultation with their advisor and with the professor’s permission.

  • HIST 3377 ANCIENT GREECE

    HIST 3377 Ancient Greece
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the political, social, and cultural history of the ancient Greek world. Topics include the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods.

  • HIST 3378 ANCIENT ROME

    HIST 3378 Ancient Rome
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the political, social, religious, and cultural history of the ancient Roman world from the founding of Rome to approximately AD 250. Topics include Republican expansion, transition to Empire, and Pax Romana.

  • HIST 3379 LATE ANTIQUITY

    HIST 3379 Late Antiquity
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the political, social, religious and cultural history of the Mediterranean world from approximately AD 250 to 600. Topics include the rise of Christianity, the Germanic migrations, and the birth of Islam.

  • HIST 3380 BLOOD & FIRE: REL, SCI & MED

    HIST 3380 Blood & Fire: Religion, Science, and Medicine, 1000-1700
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores the changes in natural philosophy and scientific thought in Christian Europe and the Muslim world during the medieval and early modern periods, as well as the role of religion in these changes. Particular emphasis is placed on advances in medicine and physics as well as the transition from a medieval to modern view of science.

  • HIST 3388 COMPARATIVE WORLD CIVILIZATION

    HIST 3388 Comparative World Civilizations
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course focuses on major world civilizations from ancient times to the present.

  • HIST 3393 HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN

    HIST 3393 History of Modern Japan
    Prerequisites: None
    The survey course examines the modern history of Japan from the Tokugawa period to the present.

  • HIST 3393 HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN

    HIST 3393 History of Modern Japan
    Prerequisites: None
    The survey course examines the modern history of Japan from the Tokugawa period to the present.

  • HIST 3396 EARLY MODERN EUROPE:1400-1815

    HIST 3396 Early Modern Europe: 1400-1815
    Prerequisites: None
    This course examines the political, social, and cultural events in Europe from the Renaissance and Reformation through the Age of Napoleon.

  • HIST 3396 EARLY MODERN EUROPE:1400-1815

    HIST 3396 Early Modern Europe: 1400-1815
    Prerequisites: None
    This course examines the political, social, and cultural events in Europe from the Renaissance and Reformation through the Age of Napoleon.

  • HIST 4181 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HIST 4181 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HIST 4281 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HIST 4281 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HIST 4310 THE MEDIEVAL WORLD

    HIST 4310 The Medieval World
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the political, social, religious, and cultural history of Europe from the Carolingian Empire to the birth of the Renaissance. Topics include the formation of medieval states, the Crusades, and the Roman Catholic Church.

  • HIST 4311 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION

    HIST 4311 Renaissance and Reformation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course examines the European cultural, religious, and social transformations that occurred between 1350 and 1650–transformations known as the Renaissance and Reformation.

  • HIST 4314 GILDED AGE/PROG ERA-1870-1917

    HIST 4314 The Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 1870-1917
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An advanced study of the Gilded Age (1870-1890) and Progressive Era (1890-1917) as the formative stage of modern America.

  • HIST 4330 UNITED STATES LEGAL HISTORY

    HIST 4330 United States Legal History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides an introduction to the history of American law from the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to the establishment of women’s suffrage in 1920.

  • HIST 4340 UNBORN LIFE:WEST TRAD/AMER HIS

    HIST 4340 Unborn Life in the Western Tradition and American History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores the history of American ideas and practices regarding unborn human life within the context of the philosophical and religious traditions of the West.

  • HIST 4357 AMERICAN EXPERIENCE:VIETNAM

    HIST 4357 American Experience in Vietnam
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A study of the American military experience in Vietnam, 1950-1975.

  • HIST 4360 AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS

    HIST 4360 American Civil Rights
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A history of civil rights activism among various minorities in the United States from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on the long civil rights movement of the twentieth century.

  • HIST 4360 AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS

    HIST 4360 American Civil Rights
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A history of civil rights activism among various minorities in the United States from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on the long civil rights movement of the twentieth century.

  • HIST 4373 STUDIES IN BRITISH HISTORY

    HIST 4373 Studies in British History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    An advanced study of special problems or periods in British history, examined through lectures, discussions, and presentations, in one of the following periods: (a) Tudor-Stuart England, (b) Victorian Britain, (c) the British Empire, (d) Modern Britain.

  • HIST 4381 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HIST 4381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HIST 4383 INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY

    HIST 4383 Internship in History
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Instructor
    Directed work experience in a variety of public and private organizations. The primary objective of this course is to provide students with opportunities to apply what they have learned in class in a career-oriented setting. Also provides students with the opportunity to attain applied research experience and develop analytic skills.

  • HIST 4392 INDEPENDENT RSCH&DIRECTED READ

    HIST 4392 Independent Research Projects and Directed Readings
    Prerequisite(s): None
    A research intensive capstone history course involving important historical terminology, source materials, documentation formats, historiography, and investigative methodologies, with a rigorous emphasis on the analytical proficiencies and advanced writing techniques used by historians.

  • HIST 5301 INTRO TO SCHOLARLY RESEARCH

    HIST 5301 Introduction to Scholarly Research
    Prerequisite(s):None
    This course introduces students to the practice of historical research and writing. It develops effective research and writing skills for graduate-level academic work. The course will help students develop an effective writing and revising process. it will sample scholarly writing, especially the work of Christian authors.

  • HIST 5301 INTRO TO SCHOLARLY RESEARCH

    HIST 5301 Introduction to Scholarly Research
    Prerequisite(s):None
    This course introduces students to the practice of historical research and writing. It develops effective research and writing skills for graduate-level academic work. The course will help students develop an effective writing and revising process. it will sample scholarly writing, especially the work of Christian authors.

  • HIST 5310 READINGS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY

    HIST 5310 Readings in European History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides directed readings in selected areas of European history to introduce students to the themes, concepts, and historiographical trends in European history. This course may be taken up to three (3) times for course credit.

  • HIST 5310 READINGS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY

    HIST 5310 Readings in European History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides directed readings in selected areas of European history to introduce students to the themes, concepts, and historiographical trends in European history. This course may be taken up to three (3) times for course credit.

  • HIST 5320 READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY

    HIST 5320 Readings in American History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides directed readings in selected areas of U.S. history to introduce students to the themes, concepts, and historiographical trends in U.S. history. This course may be taken up to three (3) times for course credit.

  • HIST 5320 READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY

    HIST 5320 Readings in American History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course provides directed readings in selected areas of U.S. history to introduce students to the themes, concepts, and historiographical trends in U.S. history. This course may be taken up to three (3) times for course credit.

  • HIST 5330 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY

    HIST 5330 History of Christianity
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this course, the student will study the history of Christianity in the ancient, medieval, and modern periods. Although the primary focus will be on the development of Western (Latin) Christianity, some consideration will be given to Byzantine (Eastern) Christendom as well as the spread of Christianity throughout the third world. In addition to the basic content of the history of Christianity, attention will be given to the application of a critical historiography in the interpretation of events and movements.

  • HIST 5330 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY

    HIST 5330 History of Christianity
    Prerequisite(s): None
    In this course, the student will study the history of Christianity in the ancient, medieval, and modern periods. Although the primary focus will be on the development of Western (Latin) Christianity, some consideration will be given to Byzantine (Eastern) Christendom as well as the spread of Christianity throughout the third world. In addition to the basic content of the history of Christianity, attention will be given to the application of a critical historiography in the interpretation of events and movements.

  • HIST 5381 SPECIAL TOPICS/INDEPEND STUDY

    HIST 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on the basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular classes are not conducted, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour of credit must be included.

  • HIST 5381 SPECIAL TOPICS/INDEPEND STUDY

    HIST 5381 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on the basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular classes are not conducted, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour of credit must be included.

  • HIST 5382 THE GREEK WORLD

    HIST 5382 The Greek World
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the world of Ancient Greece. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and archaeological contexts, and to consider their impact on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Europides, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, and Thucydides.

  • HIST 5383 THE ROMAN WORLD

    HIST 5383 The Roman World
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the world of Ancient Rome. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Republican and Imperial periods, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and archaeological contexts, to understand the interrelationship between the Greek and Roman worlds, to discuss the emergence of Christianity in its classical context, and to consider the impact of Ancient Rome on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Vergil, Cicero, Lucretius, Horace, Plautus, Terrence, Suetonius, Tacitus, and Pliny.

  • HIST 5384 THE MEDIEVAL WORLD

    HIST 5384 The Medieval World
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the Medieval World. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Medieval period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and architectural contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity and the emergence of Christian Europe, and to consider the impact of the Medieval period on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Boethius, Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, Bede and Chaucer.

  • HIST 5385 THE RENAISSANCE/REFORMATION

    HIST 5385 The Renaissance and Reformation
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the period of the Renaissance and Reformation. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Reformation period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity, the middle ages, and the emergence of early modern Europe, and to consider the impact of the Renaissance and Reformation on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Luther, Calvin, Machiavelli, Erasmus, Petrarch, Shakespeare, Milton, and Donne.

  • HIST 5386 THE ENLIGHTENMENT

    HIST 5386 The Enlightenment
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course introduces students to the period of the Enlightenment. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Enlightenment period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, scientific and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity, the scientific revolution, and the emergence of representative democracy, and to consider the impact of the Enlightenment on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Locke, Hobbes, Pope, Swift, Austen, Voltaire, Rousseau and Kant.

  • HIST 5399 THESIS

    HIST 5399 Thesis
    Prerequisite(s): Approval of research topic by supervisor
    This course is for the research, writing, and defense of a thesis project that is supervised by a faculty member. This course may be taken for up to six hours of credit toward a degree.

  • HIST 5399 THESIS

    HIST 5399 Thesis
    Prerequisite(s): Approval of research topic by supervisor
    This course is for the research, writing, and defense of a thesis project that is supervised by a faculty member. This course may be taken for up to six hours of credit toward a degree.

  • HIST 6360 PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

    HIST 6360 Philosophy of History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores topics in both substantive and critical philosophy of history. These topics may include the nature of historical explanation and narrative, the relation of history to other disciplines, and the way in which scholars have viewed historical progress. Of interest will be the way in which the Philosophy of History can inform our theological beliefs, and in particular, our understanding of the life of Christ.

  • HIST 6360 PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

    HIST 6360 Philosophy of History
    Prerequisite(s): None
    This course explores topics in both substantive and critical philosophy of history. These topics may include the nature of historical explanation and narrative, the relation of history to other disciplines, and the way in which scholars have viewed historical progress. Of interest will be the way in which the Philosophy of History can inform our theological beliefs, and in particular, our understanding of the life of Christ.

  • HNRS 1020 HONORS WRITING I

    HNRS 1020 Honors Writing I
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 1710 and HNRS 1030

    A course designed to teach the writing and rhetorical skills needed to complement HNRS 1710.

  • HNRS 1030 HONORS LECTURE I

    HNRS 1030 Honors Lecture I
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 1710 and HNRS 1020

    A lecture course designed to complement HNRS 1710 by providing information on the texts and authors that students examine in HNRS 1710.

  • HNRS 1050 HONORS WRITING II

    HNRS 1050 Honors Writing II
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 1710
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 1740 and HNRS 1060

    A course designed to teach the writing and rhetorical skills needed to complement HNRS 1740.

  • HNRS 1060 HONORS LECTURE II

    HNRS 1060 Honors Lecture II
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 1710
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 1740 and HNRS 1050

    A lecture course designed to complement HNRS 1740 by providing information on the texts and authors that students examine in HNRS 1740.

  • HNRS 1710 WALKING TO PIRAEUS

    HNRS 1710 Walking to Piraeus: The Ancient Greek World
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 1020 and HNRS 1030

    This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the Classical Age. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world. (Also offered as ENGL 2710)

  • HNRS 1740 ROADS TO ROME

    HNRS 1740 All Roads Lead to Rome: The Ancient Roman & Early Christian Worlds
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 1710
    Corequisites(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 1050 and HNRS 1060

    This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the classical Roman period and the period of the early Christian church. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization, and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

  • HNRS 2020 HONORS WRITING III

    HNRS 2020 Honors Writing III
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 1740
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 2710 and HNRS 2030

    A course designed to teach the writing and rhetorical skills needed to complement HNRS 2710.

  • HNRS 2030 HONORS LECTURE III

    HNRS 2030 Honors Lecture III
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 1740
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 2710 and HNRS 2020

    A lecture course designed to complement HNRS 2710 by providing information on the texts and authors that students examine in HNRS 2710.

  • HNRS 2050 HONORS WRITING IV

    HNRS 2050 Honors Writing IV
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 2710
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 2740 and HNRS 2020

    A course designed to teach the writing and rhetorical skills needed to complement HNRS 2740.

  • HNRS 2060 HONORS LECTURE IV

    HNRS 2060 Honors Lecture IV
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 2710
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 2740 and HNRS 2050

    A lecture course designed to complement HNRS 2740 by providing information on the texts and authors that students examine in HNRS 2740.

  • HNRS 2699 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HNRS 2699 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HNRS 2699 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HNRS 2699 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HNRS 2710 FAITH, REASON & ROMANCE

    HNRS 2710 Faith, Reason & Romance: The Medieval & Renaissance Worlds
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 1740
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 2020 and HNRS 2030

    This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the medieval and Renaissance periods. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world. (Also offered as ENGL 2720)

  • HNRS 2740 ENLIGHTENMENT & MODERNITY

    HNRS 2740 Enlightment & Modernity: 1600-1800
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 2710
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 2050 and HNRS 2060

    This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the Enlightment and Modern periods. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

  • HNRS 3020 HONORS WRITING V

    HNRS 3020 Honors Writing VI
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 3710 and HNRS 3030 and HNRS 3135

    A course designed to teach the writing and rhetorical skills needed to complement HNRS 3710.

  • HNRS 3030 HONORS LECTURE V

    HNRS 3030 Honors Lecture V
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 3710 and HNRS 3020 and HNRS 3135

    A lecture course designed to complement HNRS 3710 by providing information on the texts and authors that students examine in HNRS 3710.

  • HNRS 3050 HONORS WRITING VI

    HNRS 3050 Honors Writing I
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 3710
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 3740 and HNRS 3060

    A course designed to teach the writing and rhetorical skills needed to complement HNRS 3740.

  • HNRS 3060 HONORS LECTURE VI

    HNRS 3060 Honors Lecture VI
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 3710
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 3740 and HNRS 3050

    A lecture course designed to complement HNRS 3740 by providing information on the texts and authors that students examine in HNRS 3740.

  • HNRS 3099 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HNRS 3099 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; permission of the instructor
    Independent study on a research topic directed by a faculty member. May be repeated for credit only if the research topic differs.

  • HNRS 3099 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HNRS 3099 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; permission of the instructor
    Independent study on a research topic directed by a faculty member. May be repeated for credit only if the research topic differs.

  • HNRS 3135 HONORS LABORATORY

    HNRS 3135 Honors Laboratory
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 2740
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 3710 and HNRS 3020 and HNRS 3030

    This course is a laboratory course to supplement the texts studied throughout the Honors College curriculum that address themes in the history of science. Students recreate important experiments in the history of science in order to understand the development of the scientific method.

  • HNRS 3199 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HNRS 3199 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and permission of the instructor
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HNRS 3299 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HNRS 3299 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and permission of the instructor
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HNRS 3300 HONORS COLLEGE STUDY ABROAD

    HNRS 3300 Honors College Study Abroad
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College, HNRS 1710, or permission of the Honors College Director
    This course will explore the human intellectual and artistic traditions of specific regions of the world. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience in a specific region from various academic perspectives. Students will gain a critical understanding of the artistic, literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world. Travel to the region of study will be a significant part of the course. The course may be repeated as course content differs.

  • HNRS 3399 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HNRS 3399 Special Topics/Independent Study
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and permission of the instructor
    Topics are selected on basis of student need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

  • HNRS 3710 LAST 200 YEARS

    HNRS 3710 The Last Two Hundred Years: 1800 to the Present
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 2740
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 3020 and HNRS 3030 and HNRS 3135

    This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the last one hundred years. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization, community, and science. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

  • HNRS 3740 STORY OF SCRIPTURE

    HNRS 3740 The Story of Scripture: The Biblical Narrative from Genesis to Revelation
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors College and HNRS 3710
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 3050 and HNRS 3060

    This course will explore the biblical narrative from the beginning of the Old Testament to the end of the New Testament. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience recorded in the biblical text. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization, and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

  • HNRS 3781 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY