James Charlesworth, George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature, Princeton Theological Seminary

Prof. Charlesworth will deliver two lectures:

“New Ways of Looking at Sacred Texts Regarded as ‘Apocryphal’ or ‘Pseudepigraphical’”– Many people assume that the books of the so-called Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha are or no value or that they are “false” and “heretical.” Such a jaundiced view fails to see their value, even if excluded from most Christian Bibles. These books, some of which were sacred for some communities of faith, shed important light on the theology and interpretation being explored and debated among Jews and Christians at the end of the Second Temple period. Accordingly, these books are of great importance if we are to make significant progress in our study this world-changing period.

“The Theological Value of the ‘Rejected Texts’ and Dead Sea Scrolls for Understanding Jesus”

Lee McDonald, Emeritus President and Professor of New Testament Studies at Acadia Divinity College, Nova Scotia

Prof. McDonald will deliver two lectures:

“Why and When Was Scripture Written? Looking at the Old Testament Writings”– This presentation will focus especially on why the Jewish Scriptures, now identified as the Hebrew Bible or the Christian Old Testament Scriptures, were written and when they were recognized as sacred scripture. I will also examine when those ancient texts were recognized as a fixed collection of sacred texts as well as how and when they were organized in their current shape or order.

“Why and When Was Scripture Written? Looking at the New Testament Writings”– This presentation will focus especially on why the Christian Scriptures, now identified as the New Testament (NT) Scriptures, were written and when they were recognized as sacred authoritative texts. This necessarily includes a summary of recent examinations of the Muratorian Fragment (MF), the fluidity of the NT canon for centuries, as well as a summation of the criteria employed in establishing the NT canon. I will also examine the question of whether the NT writers were consciously aware of writing sacred texts and conclude with a brief focus on the broad agreement in the surviving early collections Christian Scriptures and a brief listing of several major related canon questions.

This year’s conference is sponsored in part by Faithlife, Makers of Logos Bible Software. They will have a display booth at the conference where you can preview and purchase Logos or upgrade your present version.

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