• You Should Take Latin: Pragmatic Reasons for Studying a Dead Language

    By Steven L. Jones, Ph.D “The best grounding for education is the Latin Grammar.” “You should take Latin.” I bombard almost every student I meet on campus with this phrase. So much so that normally students see me coming and instead of running away turn to meet me and see how long it takes for …

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  • Plucked Out of the Burning: Beowulf and Salvaging the Classics

    “And ye were as a firebrand plucked out of the burning.”           Amos 4:11 The October 1731 edition of the London Gentleman’s Magazine reports the following: A Fire broke out in the House of Mr. Bently, adjoining to the King’s School near Westminster Abbey, which burnt down that part of the …

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  • Tanquam Explorator: A Classical Model for Christian Readers

    By Dr. Emily E. Stelzer I once participated in a panel on John Milton’s theology where a majority of those in the audience were non-specialists and Southern Baptists. In the question-and-answer portion of the event, someone from the audience raised a simple, important question that for some reason I did not anticipate, a question one …

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  • A Classic Is a Story that Might Save Us: Meditations on the Christian Gospel and Plato’s Story of Er

    By Dr. Gary Hartenburg 1. At the end of Plato’s Republic, Socrates recounts for his friend, Glaucon, a story he once heard about a man named Er who fell in battle and was laid on a pyre, but after twelve days, returned from among the dead. This is how Socrates ends his retelling of Er’s story:  …

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  • Rethinking the Reformation Reliance upon the Middle Ages

    By Dr. David J. Davis On August 29, 1518, a 21-year-old Philip Melanchthon gave his inaugural address at the University of Wittenberg. Only four days into his job as professor of Greek, Melanchthon energized the audience with a narrative of Western thought that lamented the loss of classical learning in the Middle Ages, as well …

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  • Paul and the Classical World of His Time

    By Dr. Craig A. Evans That Paul, the “apostle to the Gentiles,” frequently engaged the classical world of his time should come as no surprise at all. The Christian Church of the early centuries simply could not avoid the culture of the Greeks and Romans; it was everywhere around them. In fact, it was Christianity’s …

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  • Why Athens And Jerusalem Must Meet

    By Dr. Louis Markos I am proud to teach at a university that is committed to building on the classics and to bringing together the Greco-Roman legacy of Athens and the Judeo-Christian faith of Jerusalem. What that means in practice is that we believe true wisdom can, and must, be learned from such pre-Christian writers …

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  • Teaching the Classics: Introduction from Editor Dr. Jeffery Green

    By Dr. Jeffery Green It is my pleasure to introduce to you the theme for our Spring and Summer 2018 edition of The City.  We will be exploring Christianity and the Classics for the next several months.  The word “classics” has a deep resonance here at Houston Baptist University.  We have a department of Classics …

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  • Artistic Foundations for New Mediums: How Poetry Inspires Transcendent Cinema

    By Joshua Sikora One of the joys of teaching film at a university is the opportunity to explore the cinematic medium through the lens of other art forms. Working alongside painters, sculptors, composers, and poets, I am often challenged and inspired to see my artistic discipline in a new context. As such a young medium, …

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  • The Importance Of ‘Social Capital’ And The Fate Of The American Family

    By Timothy S. Goeglein “How small, of all that human hearts endure, That part which laws or kings can cause or cure!” -Dr. Samuel Johnson Earlier this year, I was invited to one of Washington’s premiere think tanks for a public policy discussion on a new piece of federal legislation that will likely be introduced …

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