• The Necessity of Sovereign Laws

    by John Tyler, JD, PhD Two troubling trends have radically transformed American jurisprudence since the 1950s. The first is the separation of law from morality, which produces unjust laws. The second is judicial activism, which destroys liberty. This is the second of two essays on these trends. The first essay discussed the necessity of moral …

    Read More

  • The Necessity of Moral Laws

    by John Tyler, JD, PhD Two troubling trends have radically transformed American jurisprudence since the 1950s. The first is the intentional separation of law from morality. The second is the increased acceptance of judicial activism. This is the first of two essays explaining these trends, the harm they create, and how Christian universities can help …

    Read More

  • America Goes to War

    By Timothy S. Goeglein A little over one hundred years ago, on April 6, 1917, the United States entered World War I. The Great War’s centennial is especially poignant because of the massive sacrifice America made in both blood and treasure, mostly forgotten and faded now as so much mist over the ocean. The dynamism …

    Read More

  • Why Philosophy is Essential to Anything Deserving to be Called a University, Especially One Claiming to be Christian.

    Recently something of a national controversy broke out in academic and educational circles over the news that the President of the University of St Thomas, Houston, was thinking of cutting or even eliminating programs in philosophy at that school.  The reason given was that the needs of students have changed with more and more students …

    Read More

  • Teaching Literature at a Christian University

    For the past twenty-six years I have taught literature at a Christian University that confesses Jesus as Lord, that ascribes to a conservative, orthodox Christian worldview, and that believes that faith and reason must not be held in separate compartments but must be wisely and enthusiastically integrated. Fine sounding words, these, but what do they …

    Read More

  • The City Summer 2016

    Technology, Knowledge, and Mystery

    By Russell Hemati Technological marvels are everywhere around us. Their ubiquity lulls us into forgetting the mysterious essence of technology and its impact on the way we experience nature, society, and the supernatural. The Obvious Mystery Technology is a mystery hidden in a highly visible place, an ancient mystery often overlooked. It is a mystery …

    Read More

  • The City Summer 2016

    Three-Part Harmony: The Remarkable Relationship between Mind, Matter, and Mathematics

    by Melissa Cain Travis The conviction that the cosmos is orderly and that this order is discernible through human reason was a major philosophical engine of the scientific revolution. Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, and Isaac Newton harnessed the power of mathematics for scientific discovery and did so from a broadly Christian perspective on the universe …

    Read More

  • The City Summer 2016

    What Can the Social Sciences Contribute?

    D.R. Wilson “We are social creatures to the inmost centre of our being. The notion that one can begin anything at all from scratch, free from the past, or unindebted to others, could not conceivably be more wrong.” ― Karl Popper The Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone.”  – Genesis 2:18 I …

    Read More

  • The City Summer 2016

    What has the Great Society Wrought Fifty Years Later? Marriage, Family and Poverty

      By Timothy S. Goeglein Fifty years ago in 1966, there was a major revolution underway in American government that would have a massive impact on millions of families and marriages. It can all be traced back to one particular U.S. president and the unique circumstances that brought him to the Oval Office.  It is …

    Read More

  • The City Summer 2016

    Science Does Not Understand Our Consciousness of God, but Not for the Reasons We Might Think

    by Denyse O’Leary We really do not know much about people who lived before the age of writing, but sometimes they surprise us. Consider Gobekli Tepe in Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey, discovered in 1994. Dated at 11,500 years ago, it seems to have been a massive worship site. No one apparently lived at the site (no …

    Read More