News From All Corners

How Student Debt Harms the Economy
By Mitchell E. Daniels, The Wall Street Journal
To the growing catalog of damage caused by the decades-long run-up in the cost of higher education, we may have to add another casualty. On top of the harm high tuition and other charges are inflicting on young people, and the way their struggles are holding back today’s economy, we must add the worry that tomorrow’s economy will suffer, too. Ever-escalating tuitions, especially in the past dozen years, have produced an explosion of associated debt, as students and their families resorted to borrowing to cover college prices that are the only major expense item in the economy that is growing faster than health care. According to the Federal Reserve, educational debt has shot past every other category—credit cards, auto loans, refinancings—except home mortgages, reaching some $1.3 trillion this year. Analyses in The Wall Street Journal and by Experian in 2014 show that 40 million people, roughly 70% of recent graduates, are now borrowers. In the class of 2014, the average borrower left with an average load of $33,000.
Company will craft you a unique baby name ... for $32K
By Neal Colgrass, FOXNews
What's in a name? About $32,000 apparently, if you want one that's unique. A new Swiss company called Erfolgswelle offers to create a list of globally unique baby names and pare them down with clients until they pick one, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. "We follow a creation process that takes around 100 hours," company CEO Marc Hauser tells BuzzFeed. For $32,000, copywriters cook up names, historians ensure their uniqueness, translators check they won't offend in any language, and lawyers make sure they aren't trademarked.
Google is becoming a wireless carrier
By David Goldman, CNN Money
Imagine one day buying an Android smartphone not through Verizon, AT&T, Sprint or T-Mobile -- but with Google Wireless. That day could be coming soon. Google (GOOGL, Tech30) will start selling cell phone service along with its Android phones, according to multiple news reports. This has been a long time coming.
Inroads Made by Apple Pay Propel ‘Mobile Wallet’ Idea
By Daisuke Wakabayashi, The Wall Street Journal
Apple Inc. ’s payments service, now three months old, is making progress toward a goal that has eluded other mobile wallets: persuading people to use it. Previous efforts by Google Inc., eBay Inc. and a host of startups to prod shoppers to pay for purchases with a mobile phone have languished, because consumers didn’t see an advantage over swiping a credit or debit card. Early signs suggest that Apple Pay is different.
Serving God, Law at a Philippine Bank
By Gregory J. Millman, The Wall Street Journal
Teresa Ganzon and her husband bought a controlling interest in Bangko Kabayan Inc. in 1989, when it had only one branch, and it now ranks as one of the biggest rural banks in the Philippines. Ms. Ganzon has faced the usual array of developing country business risks, but in an unusual way, because she is also a leader in the Economy of Communion, an international network of more than 800 businesses committed to putting into practice the Catholic social doctrine behind Pope Francis’s controversial comments about business and the economy. In a press conference during his recent trip to the Philippines, the Pope condemned corruption, and even spoke of kicking corrupt officials “where the sun doesn’t shine.” Ms. Ganzon discussed with Risk & Compliance Journal how Bangko Kabayan has grown while doing business in a manner consistent with that doctrine, in one of the world’s more corrupt countries.
Are smart drugs driving Silicon Valley?
By Laurie Segall and Erica Fink, CNN Money
Every morning he downs a cocktail of about 15 pills, along with his trademark Bulletproof Coffee, which is designed to increase focus. He also squirts a dark-colored goop down his throat called Unfair Advantage, a product he says helps his body metabolize food more efficiently. He spews names you probably have never heard before: Piracetam, Aniracetam, CILTEP, Methyl, Cobalamin.
Needle-free tattoos can check diabetics' sugar levels
By Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience
A temporary electronic "tattoo" may one day offer diabetics a bloodless way to check blood sugar levels, researchers say. Diabetes affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is among the leading causes of death and disability. People with diabetes must test their glucose levels several times a day, using devices with a tiny needle to draw blood from a fingertip. But the pain of this constant finger-pricking may drive patients to avoid checking their blood sugar levels, so researchers have been searching for less invasive ways to monitor glucose.
Displaying results 1-7 (of 493)
 |<  < 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10  >  >| 

Scripture of the Day

Markets

Upcoming Events

Christian Business Review

Christian Business Review: A Journal by the Center for Christianity in Business at Houston Baptist University   Read More »

Past Presentations


Contact Us

 Security code