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A Biblical View of Wealth and Riches
By Patrick Layhee
We business professionals understand revenues and profit. It’s in our fiscal DNA. We know how to strike the right balance between risk and reward while growing the top-line and delivering the bottom-line. This is what we do with our business enterprises and our personal finances. Our careers and businesses pay off more frequently than they let us down, and at the end of the day we have generally created wealth where there was none before. Even if our wealth seems unexceptional by U.S. standards, we are all wealthy and richly blessed by the world’s standards.
Biblically Based HR Principles
By Wallace Henley
The era of the 1960s has been lambasted for the destructive philosophies and behaviors it foisted on society. But there were some good things that happened in that turbulent decade as well—the civil rights movement and end of racial segregation, and a new way of regarding employees.
Identity Theft Began in the Garden of Eden
By Gary L. Selman
We are bombarded with the headlines almost daily. News reports tell us about the latest assault or breach of security for yet another retail chain, major banking or healthcare institution, or governmental agency, and the loss of sensitive, personal data for millions of people. Firewalls are hacked, passwords are stolen and confidential data and information is downloaded and passed into the hands of criminals. Hackers now have your digital picture or identity (name, address, social security number, employer, bank accounts, and passwords). Suddenly your personal financial details, medical history, employee benefits and services, checking, savings, credit card accounts, and credit rating are at risk.
To Buy or Not to Buy - The Stewardship of Consumption
By Ernest P. Liang
“The world’s largest economy grew faster in the third quarter than first estimated, capping its strongest six months in a decade, as consumers went shopping…” flashed the headline from The Bloomberg News (Nov. 26, 2014). For the U.S. economy, it is hard to under-emphasize the importance of consumer spending which accounts for fully 70 percent of the national output. For the uninitiated and the pundit alike, consumption expenditure is good recipe for arresting economic stagnation, if not a sure prescription for sustainable economic growth (and by implication, the standard of living).
The Goodness of Business
By Patrick Layhee
Most business professionals of all spiritual orientations understand the many blessings that come from a thriving business community. And a large business community it is—the Census Bureau recently published their Statistics of U.S. Businesses which reports a total count of 7.4 million U.S. business firms employing about 116 million people. [i] These businesses are contributing to an improved quality of life for their tens of millions of employees and their employees’ families. When ethical businesses thrive, everyone wins. Jobs are created, paychecks flow, and communities prosper. Wages are spent, taxes are paid, and society advances. It’s a beautiful thing.
DEVOTIONAL: From Good To Great to Unique
By Lane Kramer
Many of us have read the classic book by Jim Collins called Good to Great which analyzes how a group of companies made the transition from being good companies to becoming great companies over a period of time. One of the classic lines in the book is that “good can be the enemy of great”. That is, if you focus on doing things that are good in your business they might be done at the expense of doing great things in your business. Well, I would like to up the ante and challenge you to focus on doing the things that you are uniquely called to do in your business as a senior Christian business leader that nobody else can do but you. Have you ever stopped to consider what those things may be? Those are things that are mission critical that you are gifted to do in your business.
Facing Reality
By Doug Gehrman
Growing up, I enjoyed science and mathematics to the extent that in high school, I took every science and math course offered. I loved these courses because they seemed so elegant and quantifiable. Especially math. Math problems had right answers and I felt it was up to me to find them. I appreciated certainty, rather than the fuzzy thinking practiced by right brained thinkers. If it wasn’t on the computer printout, the conclusions were in question, as far as I was concerned. This preference drove me to pursue a chemical engineering degree in college and it didn’t disappoint. I loved the thrill of solving the engineering problems I encountered in the textbooks. My left brain was fully engaged. Even though my political nature was far right, I have always been so left-brained that I must have walked with a tilt.
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