News From All Corners

Can Wal-Mart Clerks Ship as Fast as Amazon Robots?
By Shelly Banjo, Suzanne Kapner and Paul Ziobro, The Wall Street Journal
When June Adamski plucked three sets of Magna-Tiles from a bin in the back of a Target store in Minneapolis for delivery to a customer in Wisconsin, the discounter’s ordering system suggested a Size 439 box. The first two sets of magnetic building toys fit just fine. But when she tried to pack the third, she realized the box was an inch or so too short. It was a minor error, but also a small example of the challenges brick-and-mortar retailers are running into as they try to adapt their sprawling chains to a digital world.
Global life expectancy increases by about six years
The Wall Street Journal
Global life expectancy for men and women has increased by about six years over the past two decades, according to one of the most comprehensive studies of global health done so far. The rise in global life expectancy is mainly the result of dramatic advances in health care. In richer countries longer lifespans are spurred by a big drop in deaths related to heart disease, while poorer countries have seen big declines in the death of children from ailments such as pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria.
Report: Google Wants to Take Next Android into Cars
By Alexei Oreskovic and Ben Klayman, FOX Business
Google Inc is laying the groundwork for a version of Android that would be built directly into cars, sources said, allowing drivers to enjoy all the benefits of the Internet without even plugging in their smartphones. The move is a major step up from Google's current Android Auto software, which comes with the latest version of its smartphone operating system and requires a phone to be plugged into a compatible car with a built-in screen to access streaming music, maps and other apps.

Blogosphere

How to Find Happiness Through Money
By Wallace Henley
It’s not what money can buy, but how people use their wealth that brings happiness say two academics cited in a Wall Street Journal report.[1] Professors Ryan Howell (San Francisco State University) and Thomas Gilovich (Cornell) arrived at the same conclusion independently. There is a “huge misforecast,” says Prof. Howells. “People think that experiences are only going to provide temporary happiness,” so they continue purchasing tangible items believing them to be more useful over a longer period of time.
The Power of Words
By Gary Selman
Words are the building blocks that pave the road to our destiny. Words shape and determine our thinking; our thinking shapes and determines our emotions; our emotions shape and determine our decisions; our decisions shape and determine our actions; our actions shape and determine our habits; our habits shape and determine our character and our character shapes and determines our destiny. “From the fruit of a man’s mouth his stomach is satisfied; he is satisfied by the yield of his lips. Death and life are in the power of the tongue, and those who love it will eat its fruits” (Pro 18:20-21).
Crucial Conversations
By Michael Chung
Communication is the basic foundation for all human connection. There are moments in a relationship, institution, or organization that are vital in taking the next step of progress and carry a disproportionate amount of influence. Human and corporate destiny can rest on the ability of individuals to communicate what they are thinking and feeling to others who can appropriate change.

The Legal Corner

Subpoenas, Politics, and the Christian Worldview
T. Kyle Bryant
Recently in Houston, news broke that Mayor Parker's pro bono outside counsel subpoenaed five area pastors' sermon notes (among other things) on topics related to HERO (the “Houston equal Rights Ordinance”), gender identity, homosexuality, and Mayor Parker. A swift outcry soon erupted from the Christian sphere, decrying the subpoenas as an abuse of governmental authority and serious threat to religious liberty. I covered that topic here. The reaction from prominent Christians, such as Senator Ted Cruz, was swift and stern.
Uber-Capitalists and Food Trucks
By T. Kyle Bryant
The Houston political scene has seen its share of hot-button issues lately. In June, I wrote about the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance (HERO), which the City Council passed in May. In the intervening months, the City has undergone a public debate concerning two separate industries and whether to allow certain forms of competition in the marketplace. First, there’s the restaurant industry’s battle with Mobile Food Units (food trucks). As anyone who has lived in Houston for a while knows, food trucks have become increasingly popular in the last five years or so. These culinary caravans hop from spot to spot serving up interesting and unique food choices—mostly dishes that you can serve in a plastic bowl or in a paper bag. Food trucks must be permitted, inspected, and follow similar health regulations as brick and mortar restaurants. They are also subject to other requirements but generally permitted to serve food wherever they want—except for downtown, which boasts a bustling daytime population and, therefore, an opportunity for increased revenue for the food trucks.

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