News From All Corners

More Cities Raise Tobacco Age to 21
By Tripp Mickle, The Wall Street Journal
A grass roots movement to raise the legal age for buying cigarettes and other tobacco products to 21 years from 18 is gaining traction, shaping up as the next serious challenge to the $100 billion U.S. tobacco industry. On Monday, the city council in Evanston, Ill., home to Northwestern University, banned tobacco sales to anyone under the age of 21. Next month, the board of health in Columbia, Mo., home to the University of Missouri, is expected to recommend the same to its city council.
Australia bans travel from Ebola-hit countries; U.S. isolates troops
By Michelle Nichols and Umaru Fofana, Reuters
MONROVIA/FREETOWN (Reuters) - Australia became the first developed country on Tuesday to shut its borders to citizens of the countries worst-hit by the West African Ebola outbreak, a move those states said stigmatized healthy people and would make it harder to fight the disease.
Shopping? The robot will help you now
By Jillian Eugenios, CNN Money
Forget sales associates, or even personal shoppers. The shopping assistant of the future is a human-sized, multilingual robot, and it will be rolling down the aisles of a California store just in time for the holidays. Two robots, called OSHbots, will make their debut at an Orchard Supply Hardware store in San Jose, Calif., in the next few weeks. They can respond to people, wheel around the store and identify and track down items.

Blogosphere

Leadership Horizons: Leaders overcome entropy - I
By Wallace Henley
Superman, we are told, leaped tall buildings with a single bound. The leotard-clad cape-swirling hero defied and overcame the law of gravity. Leaders, who always knew people expected the super human from them, do the same: they overcome entropy. If they don’t, something may be lacking in their leadership skills, as was the case of a former American political leader. An aide described his boss this way: "Lacking something [major] to do, he falls victim to entropy, which was always his biggest problem … unless he had a goal, he could never organize himself — and then entropy took over and he became sullen and disorganized and confused."
God and Business
By Gary Selman
What do you believe about the relationship between God, His Word, faith and work? Have you ever given it any thought? If you’re like most people, even Christians, the answer is probably no. Yet your deepest beliefs, understanding, core values and practices about faith and work have a profound influence on your daily work life. Your foundational beliefs and views on faith and work will determine if you pursue the divine calling God has placed in your heart (spirit). It will also determine the level of trust and reliance you have in God’s Word and your willingness to submit to and obey the Holy Spirit as He leads and guides you throughout the day, helping you to face challenges, make decisions, respond to problems, and interact with others.
Virus on the Page
By Douglas Gehrman
It was 1987, I was forty-seven years old, and I had just left my job at a struggling offshore drilling company. The slogan around the office was, “Fix it in 86 or Chapter 11 in 87.” 1986 had come and gone, and the future for the drilling industry still looked bleak. I began a new job as vice president of human resources with a mortgage company—the largest, privately-held mortgage company in Texas—which had recently been bought by a New York financial institution. The vision for the firm was national expansion, using the deep pockets in New York through its new ownership. I felt good about the opportunity and was optimistic about my future.

The Legal Corner

Subpoenas, Politics, and the Christian Worldview
T. Kyle Bryant
Recently in Houston, news broke that Mayor Parker's pro bono outside counsel subpoenaed five area pastors' sermon notes (among other things) on topics related to HERO (the “Houston equal Rights Ordinance”), gender identity, homosexuality, and Mayor Parker. A swift outcry soon erupted from the Christian sphere, decrying the subpoenas as an abuse of governmental authority and serious threat to religious liberty. I covered that topic here. The reaction from prominent Christians, such as Senator Ted Cruz, was swift and stern.
Uber-Capitalists and Food Trucks
By T. Kyle Bryant
The Houston political scene has seen its share of hot-button issues lately. In June, I wrote about the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance (HERO), which the City Council passed in May. In the intervening months, the City has undergone a public debate concerning two separate industries and whether to allow certain forms of competition in the marketplace. First, there’s the restaurant industry’s battle with Mobile Food Units (food trucks). As anyone who has lived in Houston for a while knows, food trucks have become increasingly popular in the last five years or so. These culinary caravans hop from spot to spot serving up interesting and unique food choices—mostly dishes that you can serve in a plastic bowl or in a paper bag. Food trucks must be permitted, inspected, and follow similar health regulations as brick and mortar restaurants. They are also subject to other requirements but generally permitted to serve food wherever they want—except for downtown, which boasts a bustling daytime population and, therefore, an opportunity for increased revenue for the food trucks.

Scripture of the Day

Markets

Upcoming Events

Christian Business Review

Christian Business Review: A Journal by the Center for Christianity in Business at Houston Baptist University   Read More »

Past Presentations


Contact Us

 Security code


Find us on Facebook  Follow us on Twiter  Find us on LinkedIn